Poynter: Misinformation is inciting violence around the world. And tech platforms don’t seem to have a plan to stop it.

Poynter: Misinformation is inciting violence around the world. And tech platforms don’t seem to have a plan to stop it.. “On Monday, French police arrested 20 people accused of attacking Roma people in the suburbs of Paris. In one attack, about 50 people armed with sticks and knives attacked Roma living in a slum and set fire to their cars. The Guardian reported that the attacks occurred following the re-emergence of an old online hoax that warns people about white vans that are being used to kidnap women and children — a false claim that has roots in medieval stereotypes about the Roma. Interestingly, the misinformation spread on both Facebook and Snapchat; the latter has mostly escaped scrutiny for its role in spreading bogus claims.”

About Manchester: New website launched to explore Peterloo

About Manchester: New website launched to explore Peterloo. “A new website… has been launched that will interactively explore the events and legacy of thePeterloo Massacre 200 years after this watershed moment in Britain’s democracy. Using detailed 3D imagery the user is placed in St Peter’s Field so that they can see how events unfolded when 60,000 people gathered in Manchester on 16 August 1819 seeking rights and representation.”

BuzzFeed News: The Conspiratorial Hate We See Online Is Increasingly Appearing In Real Life

BuzzFeed News: The Conspiratorial Hate We See Online Is Increasingly Appearing In Real Life. “Connecting the online footprints to tragedies in the physical world also reveals an undeniable truth: that the dichotomy between an online world and ‘real life’ is (and has always been) a false one. The hatred, trolling, harassment, and conspiracy theorizing of the internet’s underbelly cannot be dismissed as empty, nihilistic performance. It may be a game, but it’s a game with consequences. And it’s spilling into the physical world with greater, more alarming frequency.”

Nevada Today: Professor uses Twitter data to compare real-time violence with tweets

Nevada Today: Professor uses Twitter data to compare real-time violence with tweets. “University of Nevada, Reno Political Science Assistant Professor Steven Wilson downloads six million tweets a day from across the globe to identify how people communicate with one another. He has been downloading geocoded tweets since 2012 from everywhere except North America and western Europe. He uses custom software to figure out the exact location of tweets, which are accurate within two meters. He uses this data to look at political and social trends, help identify violence and how political regimes may benefit from listening to citizens.”

Understanding Conflictuality in Lebanon: #DataforChange (Lebanon Support)

Lebanon Support: Understanding Conflictuality in Lebanon: #DataforChange. “The Conflict Analysis Project… within Lebanon Support’s Civil Society Knowledge Centre, aims at understanding contemporary conflict dynamics and actors in Lebanon, in order to better comprehend their root causes and inform interventions and policy-making. As part of this project, in partnership with the UNDP, Lebanon Support has developed new interactive mappings which provide data and information on the various dimensions of conflictuality in Lebanon, including security operations, mobilisations, and policy decisions: This data serves as a tool for civil society actors, policy makers, and researchers, to produce evidence-based analysis on conflictuality in Lebanon, leading to better tailored interventions on conflict transformation and peace-building.”

Institute of Development Studies: New online hub focuses on countering violent extremism in Kenya

Institute of Development Studies: New online hub focuses on countering violent extremism in Kenya. “Launched today in Nairobi, a new online hub focusing on Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) in Kenya hopes to connect researchers, practitioners and policymakers. The Countering Violent Extremism Research Hub, a collaboration between the Centre for Human Rights and Policy Studies (CHRIPS) and the Institute of Development Studies, will collect CVE resources in an online library to support high-quality research, exchange of ideas and a multi-sector network.”

Mashable: Facebook bans Myanmar military commander for inciting violence

Mashable: Facebook bans Myanmar military commander for inciting violence. “Facebook has just removed a number of Facebook pages belonging to individuals and groups in Myanmar for spreading hate speech and fake news against Rohingya Muslims in the country. In a post titled ‘Removing Myanmar Military Officials From Facebook’ on its Newsroom site, Facebook announced it had removed 52 Pages,18 accounts, and an Instagram profile related to spreading the type of misinformation used to incite violence and ethnic cleansing in Myanmar. “