Forbes: Why Don’t Social Media Companies Stop Violent Imagery?

Forbes: Why Don’t Social Media Companies Stop Violent Imagery?. “The intense media coverage this past week of the so-called ‘Facebook killer’ drew attention once again to the horrific ways in which social media platforms can provide a global audience to people who wish to do themselves or others grievous harm and indeed begs the question of whether in the absence of such instant fame would at least some of these acts have been prevented?”

CBS News: Did social media play role in string of mall fights across U.S.?

CBS News: Did social media play role in string of mall fights across U.S.? “Police are investigating a string of fights in malls across the country on one of the busiest shopping days of the year. There were reports of disturbances in more than a dozen cities Monday, from Elizabeth, New Jersey, to Fort Worth, Texas. Some police departments said they were responding to reports of shootings. Police believe that, in some situations, postings on social media drew attention to the fights, reports CBS News correspondent Jericka Duncan.” Don’t read the comments.

Research Paper: Tweeting negative emotion: An investigation of Twitter data in the aftermath of violence on college campuses

Research paper, in PDF: Tweeting negative emotion: An investigation of Twitter data in the aftermath of violence on college campuses . “Studying communities impacted by traumatic events is often costly, requires swift action to enter the field when disaster strikes, and may be invasive for some traumatized respondents. Typically, individuals are studied after the traumatic event with no baseline data against which to compare their post-disaster responses. Given these challenges, we used longitudinal Twitter data across three case studies to examine the impact of violence near or on college campuses in the communities of Isla Vista, CA, Flagstaff, AZ, and Roseburg, OR, compared to control communities, between 2014 and 2015. “

California Launches Statewide System to Track Police Use of Force

The state of California has launched a new statewide system to track police use of force. “Under a new online system launched Thursday – the first of its kind in the nation – every law enforcement agency in California eventually will be required to report not just when their officers have a lethal encounter but how often officers or civilians, like Petrov, are left with “serious bodily injuries” like concussions, broken bones or major lacerations. Departments also will have to report when their officers open fire, even if the shots miss.”

Research: Twitter shows promise in rapid assessment of collective traumas’ local impact

Research: Twitter shows promise in rapid assessment of collective traumas’ local impact. “An alternative to using Twitter geotags and hashtags to identify community members who have experienced collective trauma, such as a school shooting, shows promise in helping researchers rapidly assess local effects. The approach, developed by researchers at the University of California, Irvine, was deployed to study the impact of deadly gun violence at UC Santa Barbara, Northern Arizona University and Oregon’s Umpqua Community College.”