New York Times: Lawsuit Takes Aim at the Way A.I. Is Built

New York Times: Lawsuit Takes Aim at the Way A.I. Is Built. “Like many cutting-edge A.I. technologies, Copilot developed its skills by analyzing vast amounts of data. In this case, it relied on billions of lines of computer code posted to the internet. [Matthew] Butterick, 52, equates this process to piracy, because the system does not acknowledge its debt to existing work. His lawsuit claims that Microsoft and its collaborators violated the legal rights of millions of programmers who spent years writing the original code.”

Washington Post: They’re locked up in D.C. — and learning how to code from MIT

Washington Post: They’re locked up in D.C. — and learning how to code from MIT. “The last time Rochell Crowder held an office job, he said, it was 1983 and computers were not yet central to everyday life. But on Thursday, after almost four decades of odd jobs and crimes that landed him in and out of jail, the 57-year-old completed a computer science course taught by PhD candidates from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.”

CNET: Here’s what the internet would look like if all code by women vanished

CNET: Here’s what the internet would look like if all code by women vanished. “With a new campaign out in time for Computer Science Education Week, Girls Who Code is painting a picture of what the internet would like if every line of code written by women disappeared. The campaign, Missing Code, features a short video showing familiar internet destinations — Instagram, Pinterest, Netflix, Teen Vogue — glitch out in an artful yet chaotic way.”

Ars Technica: The unreasonable effectiveness of the Julia programming language

Ars Technica: The unreasonable effectiveness of the Julia programming language. “I’ve been running into a lot of happy and excited scientists lately. ‘Running into’ in the virtual sense, of course, as conferences and other opportunities to collide with scientists in meatspace have been all but eliminated. Most scientists believe in the germ theory of disease. Anyway, these scientists and mathematicians are excited about a new tool. It’s not a new particle accelerator nor a supercomputer. Instead, this exciting new tool for scientific research is… a computer language.”

Make Tech Easier: Web Code Playground Tools You Should Try

Make Tech Easier: Web Code Playground Tools You Should Try. “If you’re at all into web coding, you’ve probably used at least one code playground in your time. These aren’t your usual code editors, but places where you can test your code without worrying about the backend server setup. Codepen and JSFiddle are the two most popular, but, perhaps unsurprisingly (given that the target audience for web code playgrounds is people who have the skills to build code playgrounds themselves), there are many alternatives.”

Fossbytes: Learn To Code For Free With 8 Best Free Coding Websites In 2020

Fossbytes: Learn To Code For Free With 8 Best Free Coding Websites In 2020. “You can not only land a job as a fresher with the help of programming skills but also boost your existing career with the technical know-how of coding. But several beginners struggle to find the right place, to begin with. This is why I have compiled this list of best coding websites where you can learn coding for free. These free programming sites aren’t ranked in any particular order. Learners are advised to try these websites and choose according to their requirements.” Nice annotation. I like the bullet points at the end of each listing.

Computer Business Review: GitHub Adds 10 Million New Users, Reveals 10 Most Popular Languages

Computer Business Review: GitHub Adds 10 Million New Users, Reveals 10 Most Popular Languages. “Over the past year, developers collaborated in a staggering 370 primary languages on GitHub. Among the top 10 programming languages, C#, Python and Shell climbed the list this year, while Ruby and Java fell in popularity. That’s according to the code repository’s annual Octoverse report, which also reveals a colossal 532 percent increase in the use of Google’s Dart language, as interest surges in the company’s Flutter SDK – built using Dart.”

Slate: The Lines of Code That Changed Everything

Slate: The Lines of Code That Changed Everything. “Culturally, code exists in a nether zone. We can feel its gnostic effects on our everyday reality, but we rarely see it, and it’s quite inscrutable to non-initiates. (The folks in Silicon Valley like it that way; it helps them self-mythologize as wizards.) We construct top-10 lists for movies, games, TV—pieces of work that shape our souls. But we don’t sit around compiling lists of the world’s most consequential bits of code, even though they arguably inform the zeitgeist just as much.”

Hongkiat: Best Sites to Learn How to Code for Web Developers

Hongkiat: Best Sites to Learn How to Code for Web Developers. “Gone are the days when programming languages could only be mastered programmers like Bill Gates, who later got to dominate the world by storm. Now everyone holds the same potential, and the chance to learn and even master programming language easily. Today, we will show you 10 interactive websites that will help you do that.”

Fast Company: These tactile blocks teach blind kids to code

Fast Company: These tactile blocks teach blind kids to code. “A couple of years ago, as an 8-year-old trying to learn to code, a student named Theo was frustrated. Theo happens to be blind, and the standard tools designed to teach children to code rely heavily on visuals. But over the last year, he’s been a beta tester for something new: a set of physical blocks designed specifically to teach coding to kids with visual impairments. He’s moved on, and now codes in Python.”

Quartz: What’s the best way to learn the programming language R? (Preferably, for free)

Quartz: What’s the best way to learn the programming language R? (Preferably, for free). “As data becomes an ever larger part of work, for many people spreadsheets just are not enough. Programs like Microsoft Excel and Google Sheets are powerful tools, but they have limitations in terms of the amount of data you can work with, the kind of analyses you can do, and the types of charts you can make. When data users reach these limitations, the obvious next step is learning a programming language.”

Glitch: Free and Open Learning Resources for All

Glitch: Free and Open Learning Resources for All. “We’ve seen all kinds of people use Glitch to build the apps of their dreams. One of the most popular reasons that folks use Glitch is for learning…. Teaching someone to code can be quite an endeavor, but with Glitch’s tools for collaboration, customization, and our take on version control, you’ve got everything you need to succeed. Let’s take a closer look at some more resources available for educators on Glitch as you get ready to go back to school.”