Arizona State University: Closing the gap for real-time data-intensive intelligence

Arizona State University: Closing the gap for real-time data-intensive intelligence. “The online world fills databases with immense amounts of data. Your local grocery stores, your financial institutions, your streaming services and even your medical providers all maintain vast arrays of information across multiple databases. Managing all this data is a significant challenge. And the process of applying artificial intelligence to make inferences or apply logical rules or interpret information on such data can be urgent, especially when delays, known as latencies, are also a major issue.”

Google Blog: Expanding access to computer science education with Code.org

Google Blog: Expanding access to computer science education with Code.org. “Last month, 35 classrooms and over 1,000 students signed up to hear from Taylor Roper, a Program Manager on Google’s Responsible AI team…. These virtual chats and field trips are part of Code.org’s new CS Journeys program to help students use their computer science (CS) knowledge and skills beyond the classroom, and discover CS in unexpected places. Students hear directly from professionals who use computer science in unique and creative ways, like modeling the universe, building robots, or — in Taylor’s case — helping to build responsible artificial intelligence tools for products used by millions of people.”

Quanta Magazine: Computer Scientists Discover Limits of Major Research Algorithm

Quanta Magazine: Computer Scientists Discover Limits of Major Research Algorithm. “Many aspects of modern applied research rely on a crucial algorithm called gradient descent. This is a procedure generally used for finding the largest or smallest values of a particular mathematical function — a process known as optimizing the function. It can be used to calculate anything from the most profitable way to manufacture a product to the best way to assign shifts to workers. Yet despite this widespread usefulness, researchers have never fully understood which situations the algorithm struggles with most.”

PR Newswire: IEEE Introduces TechRxiv™, a New Preprint Server for Unpublished Research (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: IEEE Introduces TechRxiv™, a New Preprint Server for Unpublished Research (PRESS RELEASE). “IEEE, the world’s largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for humanity, announces the launch of TechRxiv.org, a preprint server for the global technology community. TechRxiv.org is a collaborative multidisciplinary hub that will facilitate the open dissemination of scientific findings in electrical engineering, computer science and related technologies.”

New York Times: ‘I Don’t Really Want to Work for Facebook.’ So Say Some Computer Science Students.

New York Times: ‘I Don’t Really Want to Work for Facebook.’ So Say Some Computer Science Students.. “A job at Facebook sounds pretty plum. The interns make around $8,000 a month, and an entry-level software engineer makes about $140,000 a year. The food is free. There’s a walking trail with indigenous plants and a juice bar. But the tone among highly sought-after computer scientists about the social network is changing. On a recent night at the University of California, Berkeley, as a group of young engineers gathered to show off their tech skills, many said they would avoid taking jobs at the social network.”

The K-12 Computer Science Access Report: charting a path to our vision (Code .org)

Code .org: The K-12 Computer Science Access Report: charting a path to our vision. “Today, we’re excited to announce a joint initiative between the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) and Code.org to create a nationwide database of schools showing which teach computer science. Called the K-12 Computer Science Access Report, the database will be a resource that everyone in the CS community can use.”

The Register: Google’s Hollywood ‘interventions’ made on-screen coders cooler

The Register: Google’s Hollywood ‘interventions’ made on-screen coders cooler. “Google operates a ‘Computer Science in Media Team’ that stages ‘interventions’ in Hollywood to steer film-makers towards realistic and accurate depictions of what it’s like to work in IT. The company announced the team in 2015 and gave it the job of ‘making CS more appealing to a wider audience, by dispelling stereotypes and showcasing positive portrayals of underrepresented minorities in tech.’ … The efforts of that team have now been detailed in a study [PDF], Cracking the Code: The Prevalence and Nature of Computer Science Depictions in Media.”

Wired: Hey, Computer Scientists! Stop Hating on the Humanities

Wired: Hey, Computer Scientists! Stop Hating on the Humanities “Computer science is wondrous. The problem is that many people in Silicon Valley believe that it is all that matters. You see this when recruiters at career fairs make it clear they’re only interested in the computer scientists; in the salary gap between engineering and non-engineering students; in the quizzical looks humanities students get when they dare to reveal their majors.”

Semantic Scholar Search Engine Adds Another Focus

Semantic Scholar is getting another focus. “The Allen Institute’s latest effort is Semantic Scholar, a scientific-paper search engine powered by machine learning and other artificial intelligence systems. Semantic Scholar went live in November 2015 with a focus on computer science papers. Today, the service expanded to include neuroscience, bringing the search engine’s database to more than 10 million papers.” More to come, according to the article.

Google: Racial and gender gaps in computer science learning: New Google-Gallup research

Research from Google: Racial and gender gaps in computer science learning: New Google-Gallup research. “We surveyed 16,000 nationally representative groups of students, parents, teachers, principals, and superintendents in the U.S. Our findings explore the CS learning gap between white students and their Black and Hispanic peers as well as between boys and girls and confirm just how much demographic differences matter. We’re excited to share this data to bring awareness to issues on the ground in order to help expand CS education in meaningful ways.”