MIT Sloan School of Management: The promise of edge computing comes down to data

MIT Sloan School of Management: The promise of edge computing comes down to data. “Cloud adoption has rocketed as companies seek computing and storage resources that can be scaled up and down in response to changing business needs. But even given the cost and agility upsides to cloud, there’s rising interest in yet another deployment model — edge computing, which is computing that’s done at or near the source of the data. It can empower new use cases, especially the innovative artificial intelligence and machine learning applications that are critical to modern business success.”

World’s Largest Computing Society Makes Thousands of Research Articles Freely Available; Opens First 50 Years Backfile (Association for Computing Machinery)

This launched in early April, and where was I? Off somewhere eating bon-bons, apparently. Anyway, from ACM: World’s Largest Computing Society Makes Thousands of Research Articles Freely Available; Opens First 50 Years Backfile. “ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, today announced that its first 50 years of publications, from 1951 through the end of 2000, are now open and freely available to view and download via the ACM Digital Library. ACM’s first 50 years backfile contains more than 117,500 articles on a wide range of computing topics. In addition to articles published between 1951 and 2000, ACM has also opened related and supplemental materials including data sets, software, slides, audio recordings, and videos.”

KnowTechie: Intel says the infrastructure the metaverse requires isn’t available to support it

KnowTechie: Intel says the infrastructure the metaverse requires isn’t available to support it. “According to Intel, who makes many of the computer chips that power these internet-accessing devices we take for granted on a daily basis, the metaverse is going to require a shit-ton of computational power — at least 1,000 times what we’re capable of today as it pertains to efficiency.”

Georgia State University: Georgia State Researchers Develop Rapid Computer Software To Track Pandemics As They Happen

Georgia State University: Georgia State Researchers Develop Rapid Computer Software To Track Pandemics As They Happen. “Researchers at Georgia State University have created lightning-fast computer software that can help nations track and analyze pandemics, like the one caused by COVID-19, before they spread like wildfire around the globe. The group of computer science and mathematics researchers says its new software is several orders of magnitude faster than existing computer programs and can process more than 200,000 novel virus genomes in less than two hours.”

MakeUseOf: ExplainShell: A Web-Based Alternative to the Traditional Linux Man Pages

MakeUseOf: ExplainShell: A Web-Based Alternative to the Traditional Linux Man Pages. “No matter how experienced you’re with the Linux command line, there will always be times when you’ll encounter unfamiliar commands. In such situations, while the natural instinct is to either refer to man pages or google the command to figure out what it does, what if we tell you there’s a better (read immersive) way to do it. Well, as it turns out, there’s a tool called ExplainShell that does exactly that: tells you what each part of a shell command does in an easy-to-comprehend manner.”

Wolfram Blog: Celebrating Computational Excellence with the 2021 Wolfram Innovator Awards

Wolfram Blog: Celebrating Computational Excellence with the 2021 Wolfram Innovator Awards. “Leaders in many top organizations and institutions have played a major role in using computational intelligence and pushing the boundaries of how the Wolfram technology stack is leveraged for innovation across fields and disciplines. We recognize these deserving recipients with the Wolfram Innovator Award, which is awarded at the annual Wolfram Technology Conference. We are pleased to introduce the 2021 Wolfram Innovator Award winners.”

MIT News: How quickly do algorithms improve?

MIT News: How quickly do algorithms improve?. “In total, the team looked at 113 ‘algorithm families,’ sets of algorithms solving the same problem that had been highlighted as most important by computer science textbooks. For each of the 113, the team reconstructed its history, tracking each time a new algorithm was proposed for the problem and making special note of those that were more efficient. Ranging in performance and separated by decades, starting from the 1940s to now, the team found an average of eight algorithms per family, of which a couple improved its efficiency. To share this assembled database of knowledge, the team also created Algorithm-Wiki.org.”

EurekAlert: UVA research group opens a path toward quantum computing in real-world conditions

EurekAlert: UVA research group opens a path toward quantum computing in real-world conditions. “A research team led by Xu Yi, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science, has carved a niche in the physics and applications of photonic devices, which detect and shape light for a wide range of uses including communications and computing. His research group has created a scalable quantum computing platform, which drastically reduces the number of devices needed to achieve quantum speed, on a photonic chip the size of a penny.”