University of North Carolina Libraries: How Carolina’s Archivists Preserve and Share the History of UNC’s Confederate Monument

University of North Carolina Libraries: How Carolina’s Archivists Preserve and Share the History of UNC’s Confederate Monument. “Protestors toppled the monument on August 20, 2018, and officials swiftly removed it. Five months later, Chancellor Carol Folt punctuated her resignation announcement with an order to dismantle and remove the statue’s remaining pedestal and plaques. The protracted conflict—with its protests, counter-protests, petitions, news cameras and rallies—has played out dramatically and very much in the public eye. Meanwhile, just a quad away, librarians and archivists at the Wilson Special Collections Library have taken on a different kind of monumental task: helping people make sense of the statue’s controversial past and the role that it continues to play on campus, even in its absence.”

Washington Post: Two women lead a free tour of Charlottesville’s Confederate monuments each month. A new website lets everyone listen.

Washington Post: Two women lead a free tour of Charlottesville’s Confederate monuments each month. A new website lets everyone listen.. “Once a month, the two African American women walk to the former slave auction block in Charlottesville. They stand before a crowd that often numbers in the dozens. University of Virginia professor Jalane Schmidt gestures toward the ground, pointing out a small concrete marker, flush with the brick sidewalk, that declares: ‘On this site, slaves were bought and sold.’ Beside her, Andrea Douglas, executive director of the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, clears her throat. ith that, the tour — which will stretch for roughly 90 minutes and take attendees through the history and legacy of Charlottesville’s embattled Confederate monuments — begins.”

The Unwritten Record: RG 109 Confederate Maps Series Now Digitized and Available Online!

The Unwritten Record: RG 109 Confederate Maps Series Now Digitized and Available Online!. “Civil War maps are always popular at the National Archives, and the Cartographic Branch is pleased to announce the digitization of over 100 Confederate maps from Record Group (RG) 109. All are now available to view or download through our online catalog.”