Facebook’s Acquisition of GIPHY: Potential Competition Issues (Congressional Research Service)

From the Congressional Research Service, and in PDF form: Facebook’s Acquisition of GIPHY: Potential Competition Issues. “Facebook is now facing antitrust lawsuits, some of which focus on its past acquisitions. This Insight discusses how Facebook’s acquisitions can affect competition in digital advertising and the potential implications of the antitrust lawsuits on Facebook’s acquisition of GIPHY.”

Library of Congress: New CRS Content Now Online

Library of Congress: New CRS Content Now Online. “Less than half a year ago, I announced that the Library of Congress is providing Congressional Research Service (CRS) reports to the public for the first time. … Since launching, we’ve added hundreds of new reports and are working hard to include the back catalog of older CRS reports – a process that is expected to be complete later this month. Today, you can access more than 2,300 reports on topics ranging from the Small Business Administration to farm policy.”

Library of Congress: Congressional Research Service Reports Now Available Online

Library of Congress: Congressional Research Service Reports Now Available Online. “I’m pleased to announce that, for the first time, the Library of Congress is providing Congressional Research Service (CRS) reports to the public. The reports are available online at crsreports.congress.gov. Created by experts in CRS, the reports present a legislative perspective on topics such as agriculture policy, counterterrorism operations, banking regulation, veteran’s issues and much more.”

Medium: Plan for Publishing CRS Reports Falls Short

Medium: Plan for Publishing CRS Reports Falls Short. “In March, new legislation from Congress required the Library of Congress publish all non-confidential Congressional Research Service reports online by September 19th of this year. That deadline is rapidly approaching and while congressional and civil society concerns about the library’s implementation plan remain unaddressed, the Librarian of Congress, Dr. Hayden, declined a direct request from Rep. Lofgren for the Librarian to meet with civil society about improving the website.”

FedScoop: Library of Congress is spending $1.5M on a public Congressional Research Service reports website. Is it worth it?

FedScoop: Library of Congress is spending $1.5M on a public Congressional Research Service reports website. Is it worth it?. “When President Donald Trump signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018 into law, he put a legislative mandate behind a decades-old transparency initiative. Buried in the bill’s 2,232 pages is a section that directs the Library of Congress to build and maintain a new website — a public-facing home for the taxpayer-funded reports written by the Congressional Research Service. In response, the library has crafted a plan for development, a schedule for deployment and an estimated price tag for the build. Fans of the CRS’s work, however, are wondering whether it’s all worth it.”

Demand Progress: Congressional Research Service (CRS) Reports To Become Publicly Available

A big thanks to David D. on Twitter for hipping me to this. From Demand Progress: Congressional Research Service (CRS) Reports To Become Publicly Available. “The Library of Congress will begin publishing Congressional Research Service (CRS) reports online within 90 days of enactment of the Omnibus, which passed the House this afternoon. The non-confidential non-partisan reports, issued by Congress’s think tank, provide an even-handed discussion of topical policy matters being considered by legislators. This will apply to approximately 3,000 reports annually.” I had mentioned this briefly last August but I hadn’t seen a progress report since.