University of Wisconsin-Madison: Nationwide maps of bird species can help protect biodiversity

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Nationwide maps of bird species can help protect biodiversity. “Researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison developed the maps at a fine-enough resolution to help conservation managers focus their efforts where they are most likely to help birds — in individual counties or forests, rather than across whole states or regions. The maps span the contiguous U.S. and predict the diversity of birds that live in a given area, related by traits such as nesting on the ground or being endangered. Those predictions are based on both detailed observations of birds and environmental factors that affect bird ranges, such as the degree of forest cover or temperature in an area.”

New non-English language studies database: increasing the availability of conservation evidence (Conservation Evidence Blog)

Conservation Evidence Blog: New non-English language studies database: increasing the availability of conservation evidence. “We are delighted to announce that we have now launched our non-English language database of studies testing conservation actions on our website. This forms part of our freely available Conservation Evidence resource of systematically-gathered evidence designed to help support conservation management or policy decisions.”

Georgia Public Radio: Scientists vacuum zoo animals’ DNA out of the air

Georgia Public Radio: Scientists vacuum zoo animals’ DNA out of the air. “A key part of protecting endangered species is figuring out where they’re living. Now researchers say they have found a powerful new tool that could help: vacuuming DNA out of the air. ‘This is a bit of a crazy idea,’ admits Elizabeth Clare, a molecular ecologist at York University in Toronto, Canada. ‘We are literally sucking DNA out of the sky.’ But it works. Clare’s group was one of two to publish papers in the journal Current Biology Thursday showing that dozens of animal species could be detected by simply sampling the air.”

Business Insider: Facebook says it will ban sales of the Amazon rainforest after an investigation found plots of land were illegally sold on the platform

Business Insider: Facebook says it will ban sales of the Amazon rainforest after an investigation found plots of land were illegally sold on the platform. “In February, the BBC investigation “Our World: Selling the Amazon” uncovered that people were illegally selling plots of Brazil’s Amazon rainforest on Facebook Marketplace. Now, Facebook is ‘announcing measures to curb attempts to sell land in ecological conservation areas within the Amazon rainforest on Facebook Marketplace,’ the company said in a blog post on Friday.”

Getty: Wupatki National Monument in Arizona Receives $1.3 Million Conservation Grant

Getty: Wupatki National Monument in Arizona Receives $1.3 Million Conservation Grant. “Once home to the ancestors of the Hopi, Zuni, Navajo, Yavapai, Havasupai, Hualapai, and several bands of Apache and Paiute, the Wupatki National Monument in Northern Arizona holds a precious record of migration, trade, and other practices dating back to the 11th century. The Center for Architectural Conservation at the University of Pennsylvania Stuart Weitzman School of Design has received a $1.3 million grant from Getty to develop a conservation and management plan and professional training program for the site, which faces a variety of threats.”

USGS: USGS Releases Nationwide Marsh Vulnerability Maps

USGS: USGS Releases Nationwide Marsh Vulnerability Maps. “U.S. Geological Survey scientists have developed and made available a new mapping resource that can identify the most vulnerable marshes across the contiguous U.S. through a combination of remote-sensing and satellite technologies. These maps provide critical information to land managers and help inform marsh conservation and restoration strategies without costly site-specific or labor-intensive assessments.”

Getty: Inside the Yearlong Deep-Clean of the Getty Museum

Getty: Inside the Yearlong Deep-Clean of the Getty Museum. “When the Getty Center reopens, visitors will wander through galleries that have been painstakingly cleaned, rid of any insects, and treated to head off future pest activity. The process took months of deinstalling artworks and methodically cleaning them and the surrounding galleries. The pandemic offered a rare opportunity to work uninterrupted in the galleries for months at a time—an undertaking that would have been difficult if the museum was open to the public.”

USDA: New, Easy-to-Use Conservation Data in RCA Data Viewer

USDA: New, Easy-to-Use Conservation Data in RCA Data Viewer. “Looking for [Natural Resources Conservation Service] conservation program data? Whether you need program financial information or number of conservation contracts, civil rights data or which practices are applied on how many acres – this and much more is available in the Soil and Water Resources Conservation Act (RCA) Data Viewer. The Viewer was recently updated with data for fiscal year 2020, and for those who want to use the numbers to create their own analysis, graphs or charts, conservation program data are now available in easier-to-use Microsoft Excel file format.”

Phys .org: New mangrove forest mapping tool puts conservation in reach of coastal communities

Phys .org: New mangrove forest mapping tool puts conservation in reach of coastal communities. “Approximately 35 percent of global mangrove cover was lost in the 1980s and ’90s. While the rate of loss slowed in the past two decades—to an estimated four percent between 1996 and 2016—many regions remain hotspots for mangrove loss, including Myanmar. My colleagues and I use satellite imagery and field measurements to study mangrove ecosystems in several countries. We’ve developed an accessible and intuitive tool that provides coastal managers with the accurate, reliable, up-to-date and locally relevant information they need for effective community-based conservation of these critical blue (marine) forests.”

Green Queen: This New App Takes Users To The ‘Frontlines Of Wildlife Conservation’ In Real-Time

Green Queen: This New App Takes Users To The ‘Frontlines Of Wildlife Conservation’ In Real-Time. “Created by San Diego-based tech nonprofit Key Conservation, the new Key App is designed to bring users a feed of new conservation events that are happening all over the world, taking them to real-life opportunities by simply scrolling, clicking and signing up. The inspiration for the app first began when Key Conservation and wildlife biologist director Megan Cromp found a disconnect between people who wanted to help make a difference, but didn’t know how to contribute to work being done on the field and actionable steps to take.”

KHQ: WA State launches new app for viewing Public Lands

KHQ: WA State launches new app for viewing Public Lands. “Recreation and conservation lands managed by local, state and federal governments now can be viewed easily online in a new mapping application, the Recreation and Conservation Office announced today. The Public Lands Inventory Web app displays more than 18.8 million acres of public lands used for recreation or wildlife habitat in Washington. Information also is displayed about the type of use, owner, legislative district, year of acquisition, purchase price and acreage.”

Getty Blogs: Conservation in the Time of COVID

Getty Blogs: Conservation in the Time of COVID. “As I write, we don’t yet know the full socioeconomic impact of the devastating COVID-19 pandemic on people and places around the world. But we know from conversations we’ve had with colleagues and partners globally that cultural heritage places and the many people who rely on them for their livelihoods have been, and continue to be, severely affected. The work we do at Getty to advance the conservation of the world’s cultural heritage engages partners and colleagues around the globe. The pandemic has made us rethink how we do this work and consider how we can continue to engage and support our partners and consultants during this difficult time and beyond.”

Hindustan Times: Maharashtra gets India’s first wood anatomical database for mangrove tree species

Hindustan Times: Maharashtra gets India’s first wood anatomical database for mangrove tree species. “Maharashtra has become the first state in India to undertake forensic timber identification of mangrove tree species for enhanced conservation of the salt-tolerant coastal trees. The Institute of Wood Sciences and Technology (IWST), Bengaluru, has come up with a first-of-its-kind study for developing an inventory of wood anatomy of mangrove species along the Maharashtra coast.”

Lincoln County News: Digital History Launched on Nation’s First Audubon Camp

Lincoln County News: Digital History Launched on Nation’s First Audubon Camp. “Friends of Hog Island has announced the launch of a digital history about the Hog Island Audubon Camp in Bremen. Since its founding in 1936 as a hands-on conservation camp for teachers, the Audubon Camp in Maine has instilled a love of nature and commitment to community and conservation in the more than 50,000 campers who have arrived on Hog Island. Sixteen months ago, Friends of Hog Island’s board unanimously approved a partnership with digital history pioneer, HistoryIT, to digitally preserve the historical documents, photos, videos, and film of the Hog Island Audubon Camp.”

Watching over whales: Online tool detects whales and ships in California’s Santa Barbara Channel in near real-time (University of Washington)

University of Washington: Watching over whales: Online tool detects whales and ships in California’s Santa Barbara Channel in near real-time. “Whale Safe combines several technologies: an underwater acoustic system that automatically detects whale calls; near real-time forecasts of whale feeding grounds; and whale sightings by scientists reported through a mobile app. These sources of information are combined into a daily ‘Whale Presence Rating’ on the Whale Safe website — an indicator that describes the likelihood of whales from ‘low’ to ‘very high.’”