Gemini Research News: Global trade doubles material use for fashion, electronics over two decades

Gemini Research News: Global trade doubles material use for fashion, electronics over two decades. “A new database gives researchers — and potentially policymakers — the ability to see how global trade affects environmental impacts. Trade is one of the most visible hallmarks of 21st century life. Cheap shipping and global supply chains mean that goods made in one country can easily be shipped for purchase or consumption halfway around the world. But if you are trying to assess — and limit — the environmental impacts of this trade, how can you possibly measure the environmental effects of a dress made in Pakistan that’s purchased in Peoria? Buying that dress drives all sorts of environmental and social impacts in far-away countries where the raw materials are extracted or products are made.”

University of Southern California: Scientist’s new database can help protect wildlife from harmful hues of LED lights

University of Southern California: Scientist’s new database can help protect wildlife from harmful hues of LED lights. “A new generation of outdoor lights spreading across landscapes require greater scrutiny to reduce harm to wildlife, says a USC-led research group that developed a new tool to help fix the problem. The team of biologists surveyed select species around the world to determine how the hues of modern light-emitting diode (LED) lamps affect wildlife. They found that blues and whites are worst, while yellow, amber and green are more benign. Some creatures, including sea turtles and insects, are especially vulnerable. The findings, which include the first publicly available database to help developers, designers and policymakers choose wildlife-friendly lighting colors, appear today in the Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Ecological and Integrative Physiology.”

Environmental Defense Fund: Hundreds of Golf Courses Tee Up to Help Monarch Butterflies

Environmental Defense Fund: Hundreds of Golf Courses Tee Up to Help Monarch Butterflies. “Audubon International and Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) recently partnered to launch Monarchs in the Rough, a program to assist golf courses in the United States, Canada and Mexico in creating habitat for monarch butterflies and other pollinators in out-of-play areas. The program first rolled out in January 2018 with a goal of enrolling 100 courses. Today, the program has far surpassed its initial goal by enrolling more than 250 courses. The program has set a new goal of enrolling 500 additional courses, and launched a new website to feature participating courses.”

University of Vermont: New Map Shows Many Old-growth Forests Remain In Europe

University of Vermont: New Map Shows Many Old-growth Forests Remain In Europe. “Though you might read about deep, dark woods in fairy tales, the prevailing story today is that very little European old-growth forest remains. But now a new study—and map—shows that a surprising number of these primary forests still stand.”

Taipei Times: ‘Frozen ark’ to preserve species

Taipei Times: ‘Frozen ark’ to preserve species. “Taiwanese researchers are contributing to a global initiative to identify, document and preserve the world’s species and biodiversity by developing cryobanking, DNA barcoding and online database programs, officials from the Forestry Bureau and the Academia Sinica’s Biodiversity Research Center told a news conference in Taipei on Thursday.”

Maryland: New Tool Provides Conservation Report Card for Every Land Parcel

Maryland: New Tool Provides Conservation Report Card for Every Land Parcel. “The Maryland Department of Natural Resources launched an innovative new tool to evaluate the conservation benefits and ecosystem ‘value’ of every parcel of land across the state. The Parcel Evaluation Tool was designed to identify and prioritize the conservation and protection of ecologically important, sensitive, and valuable land and watershed resources in Maryland for use by the department, land conservation organizations and trusts, local and state planners, and individual property owners.”