The News Lens: The New Instagram Feed Spotlighting Mass Extinctions

The News Lens: The New Instagram Feed Spotlighting Mass Extinctions. “Everyone knows the Dodo is extinct. But how many of us know that we are currently undergoing a sixth mass extinction event? To raise awareness about this under-reported story, Brit photographer-filmmaker Sean Gallagher founded Everyday Extinction, a specialized Instagram feed on Oct 1.”

Mongabay: Suite of free, open-source tools to help even non-experts monitor large-scale land use change

Mongabay: Suite of free, open-source tools to help even non-experts monitor large-scale land use change. “A recent study mapped the world’s dry forests using a relatively new tool that combines creative satellite image analysis with local- and national-scale knowledge. Natural resource agencies worldwide inventory their country’s vegetation cover, land uses, and forest carbon stocks in order to quantify the extent and impacts of land use change as well as their progress toward commitments to international treaties. However, they often lack the tools to compile and analyze the necessary data on land use change.”

Phys.org: Students bring sixty years of data to life on the web

Phys.org: Students bring sixty years of data to life on the web . “For fields like environmental science, collecting data is hard. Gathering results on a single project can mean months of painstaking measurements, observations and notes, likely in limited conditions, hopefully to be published in a highly specialized journal with a target audience made up mostly of just other specialists in the field. That’s why when, this past summer, Duke students Devri Adams, Camila Restrepo and Annie Lott set out with Professor Emily Bernhardt to combine over six decades of data on the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest into a workable, aesthetically pleasing visualization website, they were really breaking new ground in the way the public can appreciate this truly massive store of information.”

‘No Results Found’: Thousands of Climate Science Links Purged From USGS Online Database (EcoWatch)

EcoWatch: ‘No Results Found’: Thousands of Climate Science Links Purged From USGS Online Database. “Yet another U.S. agency has deleted climate change information from its website. This time, the U.S. Geological Survey’s ‘Science Explorer’ website—a tax-payer funded online database for the public to browse USGS science programs and activities—has been purged of thousands of formerly searchable climate science links.”

Reuters: Bunge, partners launch Brazil database to combat deforestation

Reuters: Bunge, partners launch Brazil database to combat deforestation. “Bunge Inc and partners on Tuesday launched an online database aimed at helping companies make investment and purchasing decisions that discourage farmers from cutting down trees for arable land. The Portuguese-language database … currently has data on Brazil’s Cerrado and will later include the Amazon region. The information can be used to assess the social and environmental risks of contributing to deforestation through soybean planting expansion in Brazil, the world’s largest exporter of the oilseeds.”

Phys.org: Indigenous storytelling is a new asset for biocultural conservation

Phys.org: Indigenous storytelling is a new asset for biocultural conservation. “Some of the areas hosting most of the world’s biodiversity are those inhabited by indigenous peoples. In the same way that biodiversity is being eroded, so is the world’s cultural diversity. As a result, there have been several calls to promote biocultural conservation approaches that sustain both biodiversity and indigenous cultures.”

The Next Web: Your social media use is helping scientists monitor the world’s ecosystems

The Next Web: Your social media use is helping scientists monitor the world’s ecosystems. “Smartphones and mobile internet connections have made it much easier for citizens to help gather scientific information. Examples of environmental monitoring apps include WilddogScan, Marine Debris Tracker, OakMapper and Journey North, which monitors the movements of Monarch butterflies. Meanwhile, social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Flickr host vast amounts of information. While not posted explicitly for environmental monitoring, social media posts from a place like the Great Barrier Reef can contain useful information about the health (or otherwise) of the environment there.”