Newsradio KYW: Delaware launches app that alerts you if you were exposed to COVID-19

Newsradio KYW: Delaware launches app that alerts you if you were exposed to COVID-19. “So how does it work? For those who tested positive for the coronavirus, and the Delaware Division of Public Health confirmed the diagnosis, it will send you a six-digit code to enter in the app, if you chose to use it. Anybody 18 and older can download it and participate.”

Slate: App-Based Contact Tracing Has Been a Bust. Apple Wants to Try Something New.

Slate: App-Based Contact Tracing Has Been a Bust. Apple Wants to Try Something New.. “So far, attempts to use apps for contact tracing in the U.S. have largely fallen flat. Each state has had to decide whether to issue an app at all, and then what kind of system to use. States that have created apps have struggled to get people to download them at all. But Apple is hoping it might change things.”

Washington Post: I downloaded America’s first coronavirus exposure app. You should too.

Washington Post: I downloaded America’s first coronavirus exposure app. You should too.. “For the past week and a half, 35 Washington Post staff members have been helping me test America’s first exposure-notification app using technology from Apple and Google. It’s called Covidwise, and works in the state of Virginia. Made by state health departments, similar apps are also now available in North Dakota (Care19 Alert), Wyoming (also called Care19 Alert), and Alabama (Guidesafe). A Pennsylvania app is due to arrive in September and will be compatible with one from Delaware. In total, 20 states and territories are developing apps that will cover nearly half the U.S. population. (We’ll continue to update as more arrive.)”

Slate: When COVID-19 Came to the Kuikuro

Slate: When COVID-19 Came to the Kuikuro. “When news broke of a ‘foreign’ virus in early March, Indigenous leaders in the 6.5 million–acre territory that is home to more than 7,000 people from 16 different groups promptly mobilized to try to keep the disease at bay. They adopted a voluntary quarantine and produced videos and other educational materials with prevention tips in Karib languages. Still, despite their best efforts, the coronavirus arrived in Xingu. Since the first death from COVID-19, a 45-day-old Kalapalo baby in early June, at least 10 other deaths and more than 210 confirmed cases have been registered….But the Kuikuro, who make up about 10 percent of the overall population of the territory, have managed to mitigate the spread—in part, thanks to innovative use of technology.”

University of Alabama at Birmingham: Alabama’s GuideSafeTM Exposure Notification App Launches Statewide

University of Alabama at Birmingham: Alabama’s GuideSafeTM Exposure Notification App Launches Statewide. “Supported by CARES Act funding, the GuideSafeTM Exposure Notification App was built by UAB and Birmingham-based MotionMobs in active collaboration with the Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) and integrating Google and Apple’s Exposure Notification System (ENS). This app, previously available only to .edu email address holders during its recent pilot phase, can now be downloaded at no cost by any individual across the entire state via iPhone and Android devices.”

New York Times: Contact Tracing Is Failing in Many States. Here’s Why.

New York Times: Contact Tracing Is Failing in Many States. Here’s Why.. “Contact tracing, a cornerstone of the public health arsenal to tamp down the coronavirus across the world, has largely failed in the United States; the virus’s pervasiveness and major lags in testing have rendered the system almost pointless. In some regions, large swaths of the population have refused to participate or cannot even be located, further hampering health care workers.”

Los Angeles Times: As COVID-19 cases surge, L.A. librarians join the ranks of contact tracers

Los Angeles Times: As COVID-19 cases surge, L.A. librarians join the ranks of contact tracers. “Lupie Leyva is good at tracking things down. A kind of detective, if you will. She’s organized and meticulous, curious and tech-savvy. For the last nine years, it has served her well as senior librarian and manager at the Robert Louis Stevenson Branch Library in Boyle Heights, where no book — however obscure — can escape her once she’s on the case. Now, Leyva is using those skills to help fight the spread of the coronavirus. The 46-year-old is doing contact tracing of people who have tested positive in an effort to reduce their chance of infecting others.”

Reuters: Virginia touts nation’s first contact tracing app with Apple-Google tech

Reuters: Virginia touts nation’s first contact tracing app with Apple-Google tech. “Virginia on Wednesday launched the first contact tracing app for the novel coronavirus in the United States that uses new technology from Apple Inc (AAPL.O) and Alphabet Inc’s Google (GOOGL.O). The state is betting that the app, COVIDWISE, can help it catch new cases faster, though long delays in getting test results must be overcome in order for it to be effective.”

Straits Times: South Korea’s elite contact tracers show the world how to beat Covid-19

Straits Times: South Korea’s elite contact tracers show the world how to beat Covid-19. “In May, when a coronavirus outbreak hit nightclubs in the South Korean capital of Seoul, health officials quickly unleashed their version of the Navy Seals – elite teams of epidemiologists, database specialists and laboratory technicians. An old-school, shoe-leather investigation showed the virus had jumped from a night-club visitor, to a student, to a taxi driver and then alarmingly to a warehouse employee who worked with 4,000 others. Thousands of the employee’s co-workers, their family members and contacts were approached and 9,000 people were eventually tested. Two weeks later, the warehouse flareup was mostly extinguished and infections curtailed at 152.”

Houston Chronicle: As COVID cases exploded, workers on Texas’ $295 million contact tracing deal did little to no work

Houston Chronicle: As COVID cases exploded, workers on Texas’ $295 million contact tracing deal did little to no work. “Just as coronavirus infections began rising a few weeks ago in Texas, contract workers hired by the state to track down exposed Texans were spending hours doing little or no work, received confusing or erroneous instructions and often could not give people the advice they expected, interviews and records indicate. Health authorities around Texas also say they are running into technical snags with new contact tracing software the state has deployed, known as Texas Health Trace, saying it isn’t ready for widespread use in their counties.”

New York Times: Google Promises Privacy With Virus App but Can Still Collect Location Data

New York Times: Google Promises Privacy With Virus App but Can Still Collect Location Data. “Some government agencies that use the software said they were surprised that Google may pick up the locations of certain app users. Others said they had unsuccessfully pushed Google to make a change.”

Engadget: National COVID-19 exposure server could alert people across states

Engadget: National COVID-19 exposure server could alert people across states. “COVID-19 contact tracing apps will only be effective across borders if states and countries can readily share data, and a collaboration could soon make that happen in the US. iMore reports that Apple, Google, and Microsoft are working with the Association of Public Health Laboratories to launch a national server to store keys and help exposure notifications reach people across states. It would be based around Apple and Google’s exposure alert framework, while Microsoft and APHL would host the server.”

Route Fifty: Local Rollout of Contact Tracing Apps Can Help Combat Skepticism, Experts Say

Route Fifty: Local Rollout of Contact Tracing Apps Can Help Combat Skepticism, Experts Say. “Because it may prove difficult to convince large segments of the general population to use the apps, technology and public health experts said it may be more effective for local governments or universities to target the apps specifically to their communities to achieve a higher density of app usage.”

New York Times: Virus-Tracing Apps Are Rife With Problems. Governments Are Rushing to Fix Them.

New York Times: Virus-Tracing Apps Are Rife With Problems. Governments Are Rushing to Fix Them.. “As countries race to deploy coronavirus-tracking software, researchers are reporting privacy and security risks that could affect millions of people and undermine trust in public health efforts.”