BBC News: New Twitter filter deletes naked pictures from messages

BBC News: New Twitter filter deletes naked pictures from messages. “A new social media filter has been launched to prevent users from receiving unsolicited naked pictures. On Friday the plugin – called Safe DM – which blocks and deletes pictures of penises sent via direct message became available to Twitter users.” It’s an add-on to the Twitter service, not a browser plugin. BuzzFeed news tested the filter. I did not want to use that as the main article in this case because some of the pictures were er well um. But if you want to see how the tests went, you can read the article here.

Motherboard: How to Take Your Twitter Feed Back From the Algorithm

Motherboard: How to Take Your Twitter Feed Back From the Algorithm. “Maybe it’s not the people or topics who end up floating into my feed, but the algorithms that put them there that need muting. By adding a few strings—little bits of code used by Twitter to tag types of tweets—to your muted keywords list, you can change the way the Twitter algorithm sends content to your feed.”

Reuters: Australia to block internet domains hosting extremist content during terror attacks

Reuters: Australia to block internet domains hosting extremist content during terror attacks. “Australia will block access to internet domains hosting terrorist material during crisis events and will consider legislation to force digital platforms to improve the safety of their services, officials said on Sunday.”

NetBlocks: Algeria blocks YouTube and Google services after publication of political video

NetBlocks: Algeria blocks YouTube and Google services after publication of political video. “Network data from the NetBlocks internet observatory confirm that YouTube and several Google services and websites have been blocked across Algeria on the evening of Thursday 8 August 2019 by state-run Algeria Telecom (AS36947) and other leading internet providers.”

Vice: Facebook Is Censoring Posts That Could Save Opioid Users’ Lives

Vice: Facebook Is Censoring Posts That Could Save Opioid Users’ Lives. “In its efforts to stop opioid sales on the site, Facebook appears to be blocking people who warn users about poisonous batches of drugs or who supply materials used to test for fentanyls and other contaminants. Just as 1990s web security filters mistook breast cancer research centers for porn sites, today’s internet still seems to have trouble distinguishing between drug dealers and groups trying to reduce the death toll from the overdose crisis. VICE reviewed screenshots and emails to corroborate the claims made in this story.”

The Verge: YouTube can’t remove kid videos without tearing a hole in the entire creator ecosystem

The Verge: YouTube can’t remove kid videos without tearing a hole in the entire creator ecosystem. “As a federal investigation into YouTube’s problems with children enters its late stages, the platform needs a solution. But as YouTube struggles to find a fix that addresses policymakers’ concerns, it’s left with a major roadblock: children have become integral to the overarching creator community.”

Engadget: Russia to start blocking major VPNs after censorship refusal

Engadget: Russia to start blocking major VPNs after censorship refusal. “Russia’s hatred for censorship-dodging VPNs is well-known, and it’s now prepared to follow through on its warnings. Telecoms oversight chief Alexander Zharov told Interfax that he expected to block nine major VPNs, including ExpressVPN and NordVPN, for refusing to connect to a national blacklist that would prevent people from accessing sites through their tunneling services. He expected that the crackdown could take place within a month.”

CNET: The Great Firewall of China blocks off Wikipedia

CNET: The Great Firewall of China blocks off Wikipedia. “Multiple reports confirm China blocked Wikipedia across all language URLs sometime in late April. The country is using DNS injections to prevent its citizens from accessing the online encyclopedia, according to a report from the Open Observatory of Network Interference on May 4.”

New Straits Times Online: Sri Lanka blocks some social media platforms after violent incidents

New Straits Times Online: Sri Lanka blocks some social media platforms after violent incidents. “The Sri Lankan government said on Monday it was temporarily blocking some social media networks and messaging apps, including Facebook and WhatsApp, after violent incidents in the wake of Easter bombings by Islamist militants.”

The Atlantic: Tech Companies Are Deleting Evidence of War Crimes

The Atlantic: Tech Companies Are Deleting Evidence of War Crimes. “…some of what governments ask tech companies to do, such as suppressing violent content, cuts against other legitimate goals, such as bringing warlords and dictators to justice. Balancing these priorities is hard enough when humans are making judgments in accordance with established legal norms. In contrast, tech giants operate largely in the dark.”

Ubergizmo: Instagram To Block Hashtags That Spread Anti-Vaccination Misinformation

Ubergizmo: Instagram To Block Hashtags That Spread Anti-Vaccination Misinformation. “Not long after taking some much-needed steps to prevent the flow of anti-vaccination misinformation on Facebook, the company is now putting similar measures in place for Instagram, the popular photo-sharing network that it owns. According to the company, Instagram will now hide search results for hashtags that consistently provide false information about vaccines.”

Washington Post: Indian court lifts ban on Chinese social media app TikTok

Washington Post: Indian court lifts ban on Chinese social media app TikTok. “An Indian court on Wednesday lifted its ban on Chinese social media video-sharing app TikTok on the condition that the platform popular with teenagers would not be used to host obscene videos. Justices N. Kirubakaran and S.S. Sundar warned TikTok that any video on the app violating conditions would be considered contempt of court.”

The Verge: Blocking social networks after terrorist attacks can do more harm than good

The Verge: Blocking social networks after terrorist attacks can do more harm than good. “Imagine for a moment that you run a small country prone to outbreaks of sectarian violence. Terrorist attacks hit a series of churches and hotels in your country on a major religious holiday, prompting fears that violence will spread. Your citizens are using social networks to get in touch with their loved ones and you coordinate disaster response efforts — but they also appear to be using those same networks to plan further violence. It’s your job to bring the situation under control in a way that balance speech rights with safety. Do you leave Facebook online, or do you shut it off?”

Washington Post: Sri Lankan government blocks social media and imposes curfew following deadly blasts

Washington Post: Sri Lankan government blocks social media and imposes curfew following deadly blasts. “The Sri Lankan government blocked access to social media platforms on Sunday in the wake of explosions that killed more than 200 people on the holiest day of the Christian calendar. The blasts, which targeted churches during Easter Sunday services and luxury hotels, also prompted the government to impose an immediate nationwide curfew.”