TechCrunch: Adopting a ratings system for social media like the ones used for film and TV won’t work

TechCrunch: Adopting a ratings system for social media like the ones used for film and TV won’t work. “While the MPAA’s ratings system works very well for pre-release review of content from a professionally- produced and curated industry, including the MPAA member companies and independent distributors, we do not believe that the MPAA model can work for dominant internet platforms like Google, Facebook, and Twitter that rely primarily on post hoc review of user-generated content (UGC).”

New York Times: Grieving People Gathered on a Facebook Support Group. Then a Hacker Showed Up.

New York Times: Grieving People Gathered on a Facebook Support Group. Then a Hacker Showed Up.. “A popular Facebook grief support page reclaimed control of its account Thursday after a hacking attack that page administrators say went unaddressed for seven weeks. The case is the latest knock on Facebook’s efforts to monitor content on its platform.”

Mashable: What we know about Facebook’s ‘Supreme Court’

Mashable: What we know about Facebook’s ‘Supreme Court’. “The company has spent the last several months hosting discussions and reviewing public feedback on its plans. On Thursday, the company published a 44-page paper that delves into those discussions and how it’s thinking about the crucial decisions it faces. It’s a long and complex process, but it’s one that could dramatically impact some of Facebook’s most consequential decisions. Here’s what we know about it so far.”

CNN: Facebook reverses ban on Led Zeppelin album cover

CNN: Facebook reverses ban on Led Zeppelin album cover. “Facebook has reversed a ban it placed on a classic Led Zeppelin album cover that features images of naked children. The cover of the British rock band’s 1973 album ‘Houses of the Holy’ was posted to Facebook (FB) by the page Ultimate Classic Rock earlier this week, but was removed because Facebook said it violated its policies.”

The Verge: Bodies in Seats

The Verge: Bodies in Seats . “In May, I traveled to Florida to meet with these Facebook contractors. This article is based on interviews with 12 current and former moderators and managers at the Tampa site. In most cases, I agreed to use pseudonyms to protect the employees from potential retaliation from Facebook and Cognizant. But for the first time, three former moderators for Facebook in North America agreed to break their nondisclosure agreements and discuss working conditions at the site on the record.” I want you to read this article. At the same time I don’t want you to read this article because just reading it made me nauseated.

Washington Post: Inside Facebook, the second-class workers who do the hardest job are waging a quiet battle

Washington Post: Inside Facebook, the second-class workers who do the hardest job are waging a quiet battle. “The thousands of people who do the bulk of Facebook’s work keeping the site free of suicides, massacres and other graphic posts are not Facebook employees. As contractors employed by outsourcing firms, these content moderators don’t get Facebook’s cushy six-month maternity leave, aren’t allowed to invite friends or family to the company cafeteria, and earn a starting wage that is 14 percent of the median Facebook salary.”

Content Moderation At Scale Is Impossible: Facebook Still Can’t Figure Out How To Deal With Naked Breasts (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Content Moderation At Scale Is Impossible: Facebook Still Can’t Figure Out How To Deal With Naked Breasts. “Like a teenaged heterosexual boy, it appears that Facebook has no clue how to deal with naked female breasts. Going back over a decade, the quintessential example used to show the impossibility of coming up with clear, reasonable rules for content moderation at scale is Facebook and breasts.”