TechCrunch: Luther. AI is a new AI tool that acts like Google for personal conversations

TechCrunch: Luther.AI is a new AI tool that acts like Google for personal conversations. “When it comes to pop culture, a company executive or history questions, most of us use Google as a memory crutch to recall information we can’t always keep in our heads, but Google can’t help you remember the name of your client’s spouse or the great idea you came up with at a meeting the other day. Enter Luther.AI, which purports to be Google for your memory by capturing and transcribing audio recordings, while using AI to deliver the right information from your virtual memory bank in the moment of another online conversation or via search.” Putting the privacy issues aside, this could make married couple fights positively incendiary.

The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds ‘sound’ words predict psychosis (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds ‘sound’ words predict psychosis. “A machine-learning method discovered a hidden clue in people’s language predictive of the later emergence of psychosis — the frequent use of words associated with sound. A paper published by the journal npj Schizophrenia published the findings by scientists at Emory University and Harvard University. The researchers also developed a new machine-learning method to more precisely quantify the semantic richness of people’s conversational language, a known indicator for psychosis.”

FreeCodeCamp: We just released 3 years of freeCodeCamp chat history as Open Data — all 5 million messages of it

FreeCodeCamp: We just released 3 years of freeCodeCamp chat history as Open Data — all 5 million messages of it. “This dataset is a record of activity from freeCodeCamp’s most popular chatroom, the general chatroom, which the Gitter team has told me is the most active room on all of Gitter. The dataset contains posts from learners, bots, moderators, and contributors between December 31, 2014 and December 9, 2017.”

WiredGov: Researchers release largest ever public collection of British conversations

WiredGov (UK): Researchers release largest ever public collection of British conversations. “The recordings used for the project were carried out between 2012 and 2016. They were gathered by members of the British public, who used their smartphones to record everyday conversations with their families and friends. These included: a newlywed couple reminiscing about their recent honeymoon, students drinking in their halls, a father and daughter chatting in the car and grandparents visiting family for the day. In a landmark moment for social science, the anonymised transcripts of these recordings were released yesterday, free of charge, to the public. This is the largest collection or ‘corpus’ of British English conversations ever made freely available.”

University of California: Hey Siri, an ancient algorithm may help you grasp metaphors

University of California: Hey Siri, an ancient algorithm may help you grasp metaphors. “Ask Siri to find a math tutor to help you ‘grasp’ calculus and she’s likely to respond that your request is beyond her abilities. That’s because metaphors like ‘grasp’ are difficult for Apple’s voice-controlled personal assistant to, well, grasp. But new UC Berkeley research suggests that Siri and other digital helpers could someday learn the algorithms that humans have used for centuries to create and understand metaphorical language.”

Talkshow Adds an “AMA” Feature

Talkshow has added an “AMA” feature. “Michael Sippey, one of Talkshow’s co-founders, says that the feature was born out of users holding impromptu Ask Me Anything sessions. But the only way for the audience to chime in was to be promoted to co-host, where they can say anything they want. They could then be removed from the discussion, but adding and removing these guests can be a hassle. The new feature, however, lets viewers submit questions and/or responses, which the host can review before allowing them through. It’s like a moderated comments section, but in real-time.”

Digg Launches Digg Dialog

Digg has launched Digg Dialog. “Here’s how Digg Dialog works: When we discover and feature an exceptional article (or video), we will invite the journalist or an expert to come talk with Digg’s community. If they accept, we will schedule a Dialog and post the time and guest on our homepage. A few hours before our guest arrives, the Dialog page will go online, and you will be able to start posting questions.” Sounds like a AMA’s cousin.