Google Blog: A journey across Argentina’s culinary culture

Google Blog: A journey across Argentina’s culinary culture. “In collaboration with five cultural institutions including Gustar — an initiative of the Ministry of Culture, ArgenINTA Foundation, the Ministry of Agriculture and the Ministry of Tourism and Sports of Argentina — Google Arts & Culture’s latest project brings together all that Argentina’s gastronomic scene has to offer, from traditional fare to contemporary culinary trends.”

Mashable: The soothing relatability of Emily Mariko, TikTok’s latest food influencer

Mashable: The soothing relatability of Emily Mariko, TikTok’s latest food influencer. “There’s nothing all that difficult about her food — her most famous dish involves reheated rice, leftover salmon, and seaweed wrappers. She’s not pitching a diet. She’s not doing anything stunty or putting off bug-eyed, pick-me energy like men who’re budding influencers. Hell, she hardly even talks in most TikToks and went super viral for leftovers. And yet, Emily Mariko is the food internet’s latest Thing.”

Google Blog: How Indonesia helped spice up the world

Google Blog: How Indonesia helped spice up the world. “Spice Up The World, a new destination on Google Arts & Culture, is a collaboration with the Indonesian Ministry of Tourism & Creative Economy and Indonesia Gastronomy Network. It features 45 immersive digital stories that dive into Indonesia’s 1,000-year history of spices and give you a taste of the delicious dishes that make up Indonesian gastronomy.”

Google Blog: Taste Mexico: Sampling centuries of Mexican heritage

Google Blog: Taste Mexico: Sampling centuries of Mexican heritage. “The connection between food and cultural heritage couldn’t be stronger. And according to Mexican chef Martha Ortiz, Mexican food is identity…. Martha is one of the chefs who participated in Google Arts & Culture’s latest program, Taste Mexico. It showcases the deep connection between food, culture, legacy and art represented in Mexican food with more than 220 stories, 6000 images and 200 videos from 31 partner institutions.”

Atlas Obscura: How to Buy Pink Pineapples and Fruitcake Off Etsy

Atlas Obscura: How to Buy Pink Pineapples and Fruitcake Off Etsy. “Both social media and e-commerce sites, from Etsy to Instagram, host vibrant communities of food vendors and cooks-for-hire. Sure, you can buy a 40-pack of gummy bears on Amazon, or schedule a Whole Foods delivery. But can you buy fresh ice-cream beans shipped from the tropical fruit paradise that is Florida? Can you buy cornmeal cookies and juniper ash from a Native American company in Arizona? A wide world of hyper-local food exists online, sandwiched between advertisements and yard-sale listings.”

Clean Cooking Alliance: Clean Cooking Alliance Launches Redesigned Website CleanCooking.org

Clean Cooking Alliance: Clean Cooking Alliance Launches Redesigned Website CleanCooking.org. “The website showcases new engagement areas, such as ‘What is Clean Cooking?’, and also hosts several resource hubs, including: Reports & Tools, which contains annual reports, industry snapshots, policy briefs, progress reports, and more; and the Sector Directory, an online database housing a comprehensive list of thousands of clean cooking enterprises, finance companies, research organizations, and public sector actors from around the world. CCA welcomes new organizations to register online to be included in the directory.”

Mashable: 10 best podcasts to listen to if you love cooking

Mashable: 10 best podcasts to listen to if you love cooking . “A good food podcast can feel like a sous chef by your side, ready to help in the kitchen or keep you entertained during a long commute. We’ve rounded up the 10 best podcasts to listen to if you love cooking. One list could never possibly capture the full breadth of the food podcast genre, so take this with… a grain of salt. But what you’ll find here are shows selected for their capacity to inform, inspire, and challenge.”

Albidad: How women on social media led a nutrition and fitness revolution in Saudi Arabia

Albidad: How women on social media led a nutrition and fitness revolution in Saudi Arabia. “Five years ago, preschool teacher Nawal AlKalawi decided for the first time to create an Instagram account—she wanted to post a simple recipe for homemade banana muffins. A few hours later, that first post had more likes and comments than she could ever imagine…. Before long, her ‘Food Evaluation’ account had more than 16,000 followers, and she was also active on Snapchat and other platforms. Her efforts were changing the habits of whole families. Clearly, parents in Saudi Arabia were hungry for health information.”

Baltimore Sun: This Baltimore blogger is preserving Maryland’s culinary history through maps

Baltimore Sun: This Baltimore blogger is preserving Maryland’s culinary history through maps. “Kara Mae Harris is dedicated to preserving Maryland’s culinary history. The Remington resident has spent the last few years logging thousands of recipes from historic cookbooks and plotting them on maps to display the region’s geographical relationship with food.”

Mashable: 5 gorgeous YouTube cooking channels that will soothe your soul

Mashable: 5 gorgeous YouTube cooking channels that will soothe your soul. “YouTube has a reputation for being filled with shouting streamers, terrible takes, and thinly-veiled bigotry, but it can also be a force for good. A less widespread but infinitely more nourishing category of YouTube content are the cooking channels, which feature people preparing gorgeous, presumably delicious meals. Yet among these there is an even more calming and aesthetically pleasing subgenre. I am referring, of course, to the tranquil, quiet cooking channels featuring humble meals made from scratch.” Watching the Liziqi channel is like watching a beautiful, calm movie.

Washington Post: Extension services are the best free cooking resource. Here’s how to use them.

Washington Post: Extension services are the best free cooking resource. Here’s how to use them.. “Formally established by an act of Congress in 1914, extension programs are based at land-grant colleges and universities and tasked with providing nonformal, research-based education to agricultural producers, business owners and the general public on a wide variety of topics, from parenting and gardening to cooking and food safety.”