New York Times: Cooking Online, Arab Women Find Income and Community

New York Times: Cooking Online, Arab Women Find Income and Community. “The kitchen, historically the symbolic heart of domesticity in the Arab world, has often kept women tethered to household responsibility, and out of the work force. Only about 25 percent of women in the Middle East participate in the labor force — the lowest such figure in the world, even as female university graduates in the region often outnumber their male counterparts. But the rise of social media platforms, YouTube in particular, is changing the power dynamic for Arab women, allowing them to turn the kitchen into a source of income and influence.”

New York Times: Family Recipes Etched in Stone. Gravestone, That Is.

New York Times: Family Recipes Etched in Stone. Gravestone, That Is.. “At his home in Washington, D.C., Charlie McBride often bakes his mother’s recipe for peach cobbler. As he pours the topping over the fruit, he remembers how his mother, aunts and grandmother sat under a tree in Louisiana, cackling at one another’s stories as they peeled peaches to can for the winter. Mr. McBride loved this family recipe so much that when his mother, O’Neal Bogan Watson, died in 2005, he had it etched on her gravestone in New Ebenezer Cemetery in Castor, La., a town of about 230 people.”

Washington Post: One woman dominated a local fair’s food contest. The internet went looking for her.

Washington Post: One woman dominated a local fair’s food contest. The internet went looking for her.. “The competition at the Virginia-Kentucky District Fair began innocently enough when a woman named Linda Skeens entered her many baked treats, canned goods and other items for the judged contest. Then she won — and she won huge. The fair posted a list of winners on Facebook showing that Skeens dominated the June 13 competition, winning more than 25 of 80 contest categories. That’s when things took on a life of their own. Her online fans wanted to find her.”

Google Blog: ¡Que aproveche! Spain’s culinary heritage

Google Blog: ¡Que aproveche! Spain’s culinary heritage. “Food is at the very heart of Spanish culture, with traditional recipes being passed down from one generation to the next across the nation’s regional communities. It’s a fragile heritage though, and one that can be easily lost in the rapid pace of today’s world. To preserve this heritage, Google Arts & Culture, working with curator and gastronomic researcher María Llamas, and the Real Academia de Gastronomía, presents Spanish Food: Cooking Memories. Following on from Spain: Open Kitchen – our first-ever virtual exhibit about food culture – this is the second installment dedicated to Spanish cuisine.”

Engadget: The best online resources for cooking at all skill levels

Engadget: The best online resources for cooking at all skill levels. “Be it beginner how-tos or deep-dive YouTube videos, we hope this list of Engadget staff favorites will get you started on your path to culinary confidence. Oh, and if you’re ever confused about measurements, a tool like this recipe converter is a good reference to keep on your bookmarks tab.” Let me recommend https://www.youtube.com/c/BerylShereshewsky as another cooking channel. Beryl Shereshewsky tries recipes crowdsourced from all over the world and presents it all with a friendly, kind vibe. Happy little foods.

Mashed: The Foodie Social Media App That Will Make You Forget About Twitter

Mashed: The Foodie Social Media App That Will Make You Forget About Twitter. “Since the news that Elon Musk was buying Twitter broke on Monday, there has been plenty of discourse on the Internet about what that means for the social media app. While the world collectively waits to see what changes will take place, maybe an edit button as some speculate, there’s a new social media app in town poised to capture our attention, and it’s designed specifically for foodies. Meet Pepper.”

Davis Enterprise: Yan donates archive to UCD

Davis Enterprise: Yan donates archive to UCD. “World-renowned celebrity chef Martin Yan’s collection of nearly 3,000 cookbooks, his first wok, thousands of photographs and other media will be the main ingredients in an archive to be established in his name at UC Davis. Yan and his wife, Susan, both UC Davis graduates, recently gifted the items and funds to create the Chef Martin Yan Legacy Archive in the UC Davis Library Archives and Special Collections.”

Penobscot Bay Pilot: New website for affordable, nutritious recipes

Penobscot Bay Pilot: New website for affordable, nutritious recipes. “Good Shepherd Food Bank, Maine’s largest hunger relief organization, is launching… a one-stop online resource to find simple, nutritious, and easy-to-make recipes using everyday ingredients. Created by the Food Bank’s Nutrition and Education team, the site allows users to search through hundreds of recipes to see what they can make with items in their pantries, cupboards and refrigerators. Many of the recipes include ingredients distributed by the Food Bank’s network of over 500 partner agencies.”

CNET: Order your favorite TikTok recipes from TikTok Kitchens, starting in March

CNET: Order your favorite TikTok recipes from TikTok Kitchens, starting in March. “Who had TikTok delivery on their 2021 bingo card? If you did, congratulations and please let me in on your fortune-telling secrets. On Friday, Virtual Dining Concepts announced it was partnering with the social video app to launch hundreds of delivery-only locations in 2022, according to Bloomberg.”

Comstock’s Magazine: Making the Most of the Pandemic Pantry

Comstock’s Magazine: Making the Most of the Pandemic Pantry. “When the initial shock of the coronavirus faded last spring, people were stuck at home and left without social outlets, some with more spare time than ever. Those with the luxury of extra hours were encouraged to develop new skills in that unscripted space, and with nearly every restaurant in the region closed for dine-in service, many people turned to online cooking courses.”

Mashable: The 7 TikTok recipes of 2021 that actually deserved the hype

Mashable: The 7 TikTok recipes of 2021 that actually deserved the hype. “Where I was once skeptical, I am now a convert: TikTok is fantastic for people who love cooking, eating, and learning about food. There are a lot of talented cooks and creators on the app — a personal favorite is chef @sad_papi — but there are those singular dishes that transcend the platform to become global trends in and of themselves. This year, certain TikTok recipes, somehow, someway, ended up just as popular as the renegade dance. We’re talking ‘ingredients became hard to find’ popular.

Irish Times: The social media chefs demystifying the kitchen for a new generation

Irish Times: The social media chefs demystifying the kitchen for a new generation. “Despite me writing a recipe for feta bake in a national newspaper back in 2013, it took a 30-second video to make a version of it a viral hit last year. The TikTok platform made it easy to share and spread, creating a worldwide spike in feta cheese sales. Being shown how easy this delicious dish is to make has been key to its popularity, as well as the visual element of those bursting tomatoes and yielding soft cheese making it look so appetising.”