TorrentFreak: Google Removes Official Kodi Download Page After “Bogus” Copyright Complaint (Updated)

TorrentFreak: Google Removes Official Kodi Download Page After “Bogus” Copyright Complaint (Updated). “Google has removed the official Kodi download page from its search results, following a complaint from a copyright holder. The team behind the perfectly legal open-source software is disappointed that they’re being inaccurately lumped together with pirate services. The same takedown notice also targeted the VLC media player, but those requests were rejected.” Google did restore the page. Eventually.

Build a better registry: My intended comments to the Library of Congress on the next Register of Copyrights (Everybody’s Libraries)

Everybody’s Libraries: Build a better registry: My intended comments to the Library of Congress on the next Register of Copyrights. “The Library of Congress is seeking public input on abilities and priorities desired for the next Register of Copyrights, who heads the Copyright Office, a department within the Library of Congress. The deadline for comments as I write this is March 20, though I’m currently having trouble getting the form to accept my input, and operations at the Library, like many other places, are in flux due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Below I reproduce the main portion of the comments I’m hoping to get in before the deadline, in the hope that they will be useful for both them and others interested in copyright. I’ve added a few hyperlinks for context.”

New York Times: ‘Emergency’ Online Library Draws Ire of Some Authors

New York Times: ‘Emergency’ Online Library Draws Ire of Some Authors. “After NPR and The New Yorker ran reports praising the National Emergency Library (the headline over the historian Jill Lepore’s essay in The New Yorker called it “a gift to readers everywhere”), several prominent writers, including Colson Whitehead, took to social media to condemn the project.” I just checked to see if any of my books are in the Emergency Library. Several of them are. If you want to read them you go right ahead. They’re old but I recommend WEB SEARCH GARAGE and INFORMATION TRAPPING as they’re more philosophical (how I search and more importantly how I think about search)

TorrentFreak: ‘Copyright Troll’ Uses Social Media Info Against Alleged BitTorrent Pirates

TorrentFreak: ‘Copyright Troll’ Uses Social Media Info Against Alleged BitTorrent Pirates. “People put all sorts of information on social media nowadays. While most of it is relatively harmless, it can also be used against them in the future. The information doesn’t only allow neighbors and potential employers to spy on them, copyright trolls also use social media postings to support their cases against suspected pirates.”

Techdirt: Japan Approves New Law To Make Manga Piracy A Criminal Offense

Techdirt: Japan Approves New Law To Make Manga Piracy A Criminal Offense. Yikes! “Roughly a year and a half ago, we discussed a proposed amendment to Japanese copyright law that would seek to criminalize copyright infringement. The general consensus is that the chief impetus for this new addition to Japanese copyright law centered on the manga industry, which is a multi-billion dollar industry, despite that particular media being pirated alongside all other media.”

TorrentFreak: Plex Slammed By Huge Copyright Coalition For Not Policing Pirates

TorrentFreak: Plex Slammed By Huge Copyright Coalition For Not Policing Pirates. “Plex has become the latest neutral technology to get slammed for not doing enough to prevent movie and TV show piracy. According to pro-copyright lobby group CreativeFuture, which represents more than 560 companies and organizations, Plex – like Kodi – is a ‘dangerous digital media player’ that has joined the ranks of ‘internet heavyweights who refuse to take responsibility for the criminal behavior on their platforms.'”

The Verge: Go read about a law school’s ridiculous battle over YouTube copyright strikes

The Verge: Go read about a law school’s ridiculous battle over YouTube copyright strikes. “Copyright law is two things: a gnostically complex rubric for deciding who can reproduce a work of art, and one of the most powerful legal forces on the internet. But precisely how complex and how powerful? Well, enough that a major law school thought it might lose its YouTube channel in a copyright dispute over a video explaining copyright law.”