TechCrunch: SoftBank buys perpetual Yahoo trademark license for $1.6 billion

TechCrunch: SoftBank buys perpetual Yahoo trademark license for $1.6 billion. “The extremely descriptive Z Holdings owns SoftBank’s internet businesses in Japan, most notably Yahoo Japan, whose web portal remains the country’s most trafficked news website. Under its most current agreement with Verizon Media (formerly Oath, formerly AOL + Yahoo), Yahoo Japan paid a regular royalty for the rights to use the Yahoo brand name in Japan and associated technologies. Those royalties will now stop in lieu of a one-time upfront payment.”

The Verge: Riot made some chill beats for creators to stream to

The Verge: Riot made some chill beats for creators to stream to. “League of Legends developer Riot is making something new — and very chill. The company just released an album called Sessions: Vi, which is packed with 37 lo-fi tracks from producers like Chromonicci, Junior State, Laxcity, and Tennyson. The idea, the company says, is to offer ‘stream-safe’ music that creators on platforms like YouTube and Twitch can use, without having to worry about copyright strikes.”

Gizmodo: Watch a Police Officer Admit He’s Playing a Taylor Swift Song to Keep Activist’s Video Off YouTube

Gizmodo: Watch a Police Officer Admit He’s Playing a Taylor Swift Song to Keep Activist’s Video Off YouTube. “On Tuesday, a group of protesters showed up at the Alameda Courthouse in Oakland, California, for the pre-trial hearing for Jason Fletcher, a police officer who was charged with manslaughter for shooting and killing Steven Taylor, a Black man, inside of a Walmart last year. Along with Taylor’s family, advocates for justice gathered to listen to the hearing broadcast on the courthouse steps, as covid restrictions prevented them from entering the courtroom. That’s when a sheriff’s deputy showed up with some pop tunes.”

Don’t Sue Me Like That: Anatomy of a Copyright Troll (Bloomberg)

Bloomberg: Don’t Sue Me Like That: Anatomy of a Copyright Troll. “Just as there are patent trolls who acquire intellectual property on the cheap and then attempt to extract payments from large companies, there are those who take advantage of laws designed to protect the works of artists and authors. Their targets, typically, are small publishers who might not appreciate their own vulnerability until they’re hit with a complaint.”

The Register: Euro court rules YouTube not automatically liable for users illegally uploading copyright-protected material

The Register: Euro court rules YouTube not automatically liable for users illegally uploading copyright-protected material . “Europe’s leading court has partly sided with YouTube regarding copyrighted works posted illegally online in a case that touches on ‘profound divisions’ in how the internet is used. The case, Frank Peterson and Elsevier Inc. v Google LLC and Others, was first brought by German music producer Peterson against the YouTube platform in the German courts in 2009.”

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Announces Copyright Public Modernization Committee

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Announces Copyright Public Modernization Committee . “The Library of Congress announced today the membership of the new Copyright Public Modernization Committee (CPMC), which is being convened to enhance communication and provide a public forum for the technology-related aspects of the U.S. Copyright Office’s modernization initiative. The first CPMC meeting will be hosted by the Library on July 22, 2021.”

EU court rules in Telenet copyright case: ISPs can be forced to hand over some customer data use details (The Register)

The Register: EU court rules in Telenet copyright case: ISPs can be forced to hand over some customer data use details. “Europe’s top court has ruled ISPs can be forced to hand over the details of customers who are alleged to have downloaded material illegally online – but only if they meet certain criteria. That’s the latest judgement in another case involving Cyprus-based Mircom International Content Management Consulting, and Belgian ISP Telenet.”

The end of an odyssey: The German Act to adapt copyright law to the requirements of the Digital Single Market (Lexology)

Lexology: The end of an odyssey: The German Act to adapt copyright law to the requirements of the Digital Single Market. “The German Act to adapt copyright law to the requirements of the Digital Single Market will enter into force on 7 June 2021 – as the first national transposition of the Digital Single Market Directive (‘DSM Directive’). It will result in major amendments of German Copyright law and is the attempt to not only unite conflicting interests of rights holders, authors and internet users but also to adjust the partially outdated German copyright law to the digital age. As a result, a huge variety of partly controversially discussed new provisions and amendments will be implemented. We have looked into it and share with you some of the highlights of the new regulation.”

IP Watchdog: Non-Fungible Tokens Force a Copyright Reckoning

IP Watchdog: Non-Fungible Tokens Force a Copyright Reckoning. “The cycle of copyright law trying, and generally failing, to adapt and keep pace with emerging technology has meant copyright stakeholders have been always at a disadvantage because legal enforcement lagged so far behind innovative infringement. But during a year in which vast swaths of life moved online, the internet has forged and driven to prominence a powerful new tool for protecting copyright owners’ unique assets: the non-fungible token (NFT).”

Internet Archive Blogs: The Librarian’s Copyright Companion Goes Open Access

Internet Archive Blogs: The Librarian’s Copyright Companion Goes Open Access. “As a law librarian and author, Ben Keele wants to share his expertise on copyright with as many people as possible. His book, The Librarian’s Copyright Companion, 2nd edition (William S. Hein, 2012), coauthored with James Heller and Paul Hellyer, covers restrictions on use of copyrighted materials, library exemptions, fair use, and licensing issues for digital media. (Heller wrote the first edition in 2004.) The authors recently regained rights to the book in order to make it open access.”

Vice: New Video Shows Beverly Hills Cops Playing Beatles to Trigger Instagram Copyright Filter

Vice: New Video Shows Beverly Hills Cops Playing Beatles to Trigger Instagram Copyright Filter. “As VICE News reported Tuesday, police in Beverly Hills have repeatedly played copyrighted music while being filmed, seemingly in an attempt to trigger Instagram’s algorithmic copyright filters, which could result in videos of police interactions with the public being taken down. Repeated infractions can result in the suspension of live streamers’ accounts.”