Reuters: Google wins legal battle with German publishers over fee demands

Reuters: Google wins legal battle with German publishers over fee demands. The last thing that will happen before the sun burns out is someone filing another legal brief over Google News snippets. “Google won a legal battle on Thursday after Europe’s top court said publishers in Germany could not demand copyright fees since 2013 from the tech firm because the European Commission had not been notified of the German regulation.”

Publishers Weekly: Audible Tells IBPA It Will Press Pause on Full Captions Rollout

Publishers Weekly: Audible Tells IBPA It Will Press Pause on Full Captions Rollout. “In an email to the Independent Book Publishers Association this week, Audible confirmed that it will limit its controversial Captions program to public domain works—and apparently to a small beta group of students—until a copyright lawsuit filed by seven major publishers and supported by the Association of American Publishers is resolved.”

Reuters: Republican, Democratic U.S. lawmakers ask Google to expand copyright protections

Reuters: Republican, Democratic U.S. lawmakers ask Google to expand copyright protections. “A bipartisan group of U.S. lawmakers on Wednesday asked the chief executive of Alphabet’s Google to expand its use of technology that prevents copyright infringement to smaller creators who are ‘at a significant disadvantage.'”

Lifehacker: What to Do When You Receive a Takedown Request

Lifehacker: What to Do When You Receive a Takedown Request. “On Monday, YouTube filed a lawsuit against one of its users for extorting others through false copyright strikes; after submitting unverified copyright claims on videos, the user in question would demand a payment (like $300 by Paypal or $200 in Bitcoin) or threaten a third copyright strike on their account, which would mean termination from the platform altogether. The problem isn’t just that this user extorted others (though that’s terrible, too); it’s that platforms like YouTube arguably don’t devote enough effort to validating these claims, meaning users can freely submit takedown requests as a means of threatening other accounts.”

Techdirt: Why Is MLB Claiming Revenue From Obviously Fair Use Videos On YouTube?

Techdirt: Why Is MLB Claiming Revenue From Obviously Fair Use Videos On YouTube?. “Nearly a decade ago, we wrote a bunch about an excellent book called Copyfraud, by law professor Jason Mazzone, which went into great detail about how the legacy entertainment industry companies have used copyright in ways that are clearly against copyright’s intent — to the point that they border on fraud. The concept of copyfraud should be referred to more frequently, and here’s a perfect example.”

Popular Science: Posting a copyright notice on social media doesn’t actually accomplish anything

Popular Science: Posting a copyright notice on social media doesn’t actually accomplish anything . “f you’ve logged into Instagram since last week, you may have seen people posting a long, typo-laden screed about a new rule going into effect that gives the company the ability to sell, use, or share your photos unless you repost a specific message denying it. I have even seen a few famous photographers doing it. The statement sounds official, but it’s actually just the latest iteration of an internet chain letter that won’t do anything to protect your privacy or intellectual property from the social media networks or the wilds of the internet in general.”

The Verge: YouTube sues alleged copyright troll over extortion of multiple YouTubers

The Verge: YouTube sues alleged copyright troll over extortion of multiple YouTubers. “YouTube is going after an alleged copyright troll using the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s (DMCA) provisions, alleging that Christopher Brady used false copyright strikes to extort YouTube creators, harming the company in the process. Now, YouTube is suing Brady, using the DMCA’s provisions against fraudulent takedown claims, seeking compensatory damages and an injunction against future fraudulent claims.”