University of Hawaii News: New AI reef conservation tool monitors, measures from space

University of Hawaii News: New AI reef conservation tool monitors, measures from space . “A new coral reef conservation tool has been developed by University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa researchers using cutting-edge artificial intelligence (AI) technology. By developing novel deep learning algorithms, coral ecologists in the UH Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) are now able to identify and measure reef halos from space.”

Engadget: Google wants you to lend your ears to help save coral reefs

Engadget: Google wants you to lend your ears to help save coral reefs. “Google is calling on recruits to help repopulate coral reefs. Its new project, a collaboration with marine biologist Steve Simpson and marine ecologist Mary Shodipo, wants your help training AI to recognize aquatic wildlife sounds in hopes of replenishing them and raising awareness of the ocean’s troubled habitats.”

University at Buffalo: These stunning 3D models of coral reefs are a crucial research tool

University at Buffalo: These stunning 3D models of coral reefs are a crucial research tool. “Where do coral larvae, called planulae, like to settle? What seascapes help youngsters of different coral species flourish? And do varying species compete for the same microhabitats/spots on the reef? To study these questions, University at Buffalo scientist Ángela Martínez Quintana has created stunning 3D digital models that visualize the surface of coral reefs in painstaking detail. And these artful re-creations aren’t just beautiful: They’re also filled with data on the distribution of young corals, known as recruits, that scientists are analyzing.”

Arizona State University: ASU center announces first-ever global coral reef maps

Arizona State University: ASU center announces first-ever global coral reef maps. “On Sept. 8, the Allen Coral Atlas met a major milestone by completing global habitat maps of the world’s tropical, shallow coral reefs. A combination of satellite imagery, advanced analytics and global collaboration has resulted in maps that show the marine ecosystems’ benthic and geomorphic data in unprecedented detail. With eyes in the sky, the technology recognizes geomorphic, or seascape structures, up to about 15 meters (52 feet) underwater and benthic data, or the composition of the ocean floor, up to about 10 meters (33 feet) underwater.”

EurekAlert: Forty years of coral spawning captured in one place for the first time

EurekAlert: Forty years of coral spawning captured in one place for the first time. “Led by researchers at Newcastle University, UK, and James Cook University, Australia, the Coral Spawning Database (CSD) for the first time collates vital information about the timing and geographical variation of coral spawning. This was a huge international effort that includes over 90 authors from 60 institutions in 20 countries.”

Arizona State University: Location, extent of coral reefs mapped worldwide using advanced AI

Arizona State University: Location, extent of coral reefs mapped worldwide using advanced AI. “…researchers from the Arizona State University Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science have generated a global coral reef extent map using a single methodology capable of predicting the location of shallow coral reefs with nearly 90% accuracy. The study was published in the journal, Coral Reefs.”

CNET: NASA created a game that lets you help map the ocean’s coral reefs

CNET: NASA created a game that lets you help map the ocean’s coral reefs. “Specifically, researchers at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California have spent years canvassing the ocean floor using special cameras mounted to drones and aircraft. The unique lenses on the cameras give the researchers a clear view of the ocean floor, including coral and other wildlife with 3D imagery from locations in places like Puerto Rico, Guam and American Samoa. Now, NASA has a huge job on its hands — combing through those images and identifying everything that’s in them. NASA’s solution? A new game for Mac and iOS called NeMO-Net, which you can play right now (an Android version is still in the works).”

James Cook University: New global database to guide coral restoration

James Cook University: New global database to guide coral restoration. “Coral restoration projects typically focus on reintroducing coral to areas where coral reefs are degraded or lost. Common strategies include attaching small fragments of coral, reintroducing baby coral, or stabilising the material coral grows on. Dr Boström-Einarsson was part of an international team of scientists that looked at 362 case studies on active coral restoration spanning four decades in 56 countries. The researchers developed a database to document case studies of coral restoration from around the world.”

Phys .org: Scientists create largest collection of coral reef maps ever made

Phys .org: Scientists create largest collection of coral reef maps ever made . “The high-resolution coral reef maps made for this study can be found on the World Reef Map, an interactive coral reef atlas where users can explore all of the coral reefs and shallow water marine habitats mapped on the Global Reef Expedition. Although they by no means cover every reef worldwide, this new atlas covers a meaningful portion of key reef provinces around the world.”

Gulf News: Citizen science volunteers to monitor and protect UAE’s coral reefs

Gulf News: Citizen science volunteers to monitor and protect UAE’s coral reefs. “The research is being led by Reef Check UAE and is part of a wider global effort that sees citizen scientists from around the world collecting data on the oceans’ coral reefs, with all the data and information being shared within the group’s global database, which is then used to compare the status of coral reefs in different parts of the world.”

Quartz: Despite global warming, some reefs are flourishing, and you can see it in 3D

Quartz: Despite global warming, some reefs are flourishing, and you can see it in 3D. “The videos themselves are an astonishing and important part of the project. Although the corals look computer generated, the videos represent actual reef systems shot with off the shelf DSLR cameras. They are assembled from as many as 4000 photographs, shot by divers who swim lawnmower patterns over the reef, snapping a picture every second. The images are then run through a software process called photogrammetry, which stitches the images together into a 3-dimensional whole, allowing the viewer to glide across the reef with resolution down to one centimeter.”

ABC (Australia): Coral-bleaching database puts Australia second worst in the world

ABC (Australia): Coral-bleaching database puts Australia second worst in the world. “Scientists have compiled a new global database of coral reef mass-bleaching events that shows the likelihood of bleaching increased eight-fold from the late 1990s. The new database includes 80 per cent more reports of coral bleaching than the existing databank, with Australia having the second-worst record.”