Cornell Chronicle: Stonewall anniversary inspires digitized postcard collection

Cornell Chronicle: Stonewall anniversary inspires digitized postcard collection. “Postcards from the past can deliver important lessons for the present, according to Brenda Marston, curator of the Cornell Human Sexuality Collection. Through a grants program, she collaborated with faculty members in digitizing early-20th century postcards of cross-dressers in Europe and the United States as an important resource for scholars of gender and sexuality studies, performance studies, language and literature.”

Cornell University: Research examines intent behind Facebook posts

Cornell University: Research examines intent behind Facebook posts. “Why do we share posts on Facebook? Are we seeking factual information, like the name of the plant taking over the front yard? Are we expressing frustration while seeking sympathy? Is it pure narcissism or narcissism by proxy, via our children? Is it bragging, or bragging’s sneaky cousin, humblebragging? Or is it something worse?”

Newswise: Cornell team, EPA to partner on emissions big data project

Newswise: Cornell team, EPA to partner on emissions big data project. “ITHACA, N.Y. – A team from Cornell University associate professor Max Zhang’s lab will work with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) over the next year on a machine learning model designed to predict fossil fuel emissions. The project was a winning entry in the EPA-sponsored EmPOWER Air Data Challenge.”

EurekAlert: To win online debates, social networks worth a thousand words

EurekAlert: To win online debates, social networks worth a thousand words. “Want to win an argument online? Bolstering your social network may be more helpful than rehearsing your rhetorical flourishes. According to Cornell researchers, social interactions are more important than language in predicting who is going to succeed at online debating. However, the most accurate model for predicting successful debaters combines information about social interactions and language, the researchers found.”

Cornell University: Scientists propose bird conservation plan based on eBird data

Cornell University: Scientists propose bird conservation plan based on eBird data. “An international team of scientists used eBird, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s global citizen science database, to calculate how to sufficiently conserve habitat across the Western Hemisphere for all the habitats these birds use throughout their annual cycle of breeding, migration and overwintering. The study provides planners with guidance on the locations and amounts of land that must be conserved for 30% of the global populations for each of 117 bird species that migrate to the Neotropics (Central and South America, the Caribbean and southern North America).”

Cornell Chronicle: Study uses neural networks to define Dada

Cornell Chronicle: Study uses neural networks to define Dada. “To make a Dadaist poem, artist Tristan Tzara once said, cut out each word of a newspaper article. Put the words into a bag and shake. Remove the words from the bag one at a time, and write them down in that order. This ‘bag of words’ method is not entirely different from how artificial intelligence algorithms identify words and images, breaking them down into components one step at a time. The similarity inspired Cornell researchers to explore whether an algorithm could be trained to differentiate digitized Dadaist journals from non-Dada avant-garde journals – a formidable task, given that many consider Dada inherently undefinable.”

Cornell University: Freedom on the Move launches database of fugitives from American slavery

Cornell University: Freedom on the Move launches database of fugitives from American slavery. “Freedom on the Move (FOTM), an online project devoted to fugitives from slavery in North America, is enlisting the help of the public to create a database for tens of thousands of advertisements placed by enslavers who wanted to recapture self-liberating Africans and African-Americans…. The free, open-source site has been designed to be accessible to the public. Users can quickly set up an account and begin working with digitized versions of the advertisements. Users transcribe the text of an advertisement and then answer questions about the ad and the person it describes. They can choose to transcribe ads from a particular state or specific time period, depending on their areas of interest.” I’m sure you’ve heard of this project before – it looks like I mentioned it in RB back in 2016 – but now it has officially launched.