Cornell Chronicle: Weill Cornell doctor creates epidemic modeling tool

Cornell Chronicle: Weill Cornell doctor creates epidemic modeling tool. “Using a tool he created called the Cornell COVID Caseload Calculator C5V, Dr. Nathaniel Hupert, associate professor of population health sciences and of medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine, has been making forecasts of the potential impact of COVID-19 on local and regional health care systems. The data helps state and city leaders answer questions related to when cases of the disease will peak in hospitals and what resources will be needed to successfully care for those patients.”

Cornell Chronicle: Cornell creates detailed COVID-19 website for food industry

Cornell Chronicle: Cornell creates detailed COVID-19 website for food industry. “To keep New York’s food processing industry safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, Cornell’s Institute for Food Safety has created a comprehensive, practical and convenient website for commercial processors: Food Industry Resources for Coronavirus (COVID-19).”

Cornell Chronicle: AI tool detects global fashion trends

Cornell Chronicle: AI tool detects global fashion trends. “GeoStyle analyzes public Instagram and Flickr photos to map trends using computer vision and neural networks, a kind of artificial intelligence often used to sort images. Its models help researchers understand existing trends in specific cities and around the world over time, and its trend forecasts are up to 20% more accurate than previous methods.”

Cornell Chronicle: Five projects awarded 2019 digitization grants

Cornell Chronicle: Five projects awarded 2019 digitization grants. “Cornell University Library’s Grants Program for Digital Collections in Arts and Sciences transforms fragile artifacts into lasting online collections for teaching and research. This year, the program has awarded funding to five projects representing a range of study, from unearthing a vanished hamlet in Enfield Falls, New York, to examining modern art in Indonesia.”

Cornell: CVM scientists develop online tool to guide wildlife repopulation efforts

Cornell: CVM scientists develop online tool to guide wildlife repopulation efforts. “Wildlife ecologists often turn to reintroduction programs to help sustain key species in certain habitats. While the wild turkey effort was a success, other long-term reintroduction programs struggle to see their species thrive. To help address this problem, a multidisciplinary team with the Cornell Wildlife Health Lab has created StaPOPd, an interactive online tool that tells users exactly how many plants or animals they need to introduce into a habitat in order to establish a stable population.”

Cornell Chronicle: For online reviews, shoppers believe a pretty face

Cornell Chronicle: For online reviews, shoppers believe a pretty face. “Beauty is truth – or at least, that’s what consumers sifting through online reviews seem to think. New Cornell research has found that people are more inclined to be swayed by positive recommendations posted online by attractive reviewers.” Well, that’s one job I ain’t gonna get.

Tubefilter: The YouTube Radicalization Pipeline Exists, And It’s Driving Users Toward Increasingly Alt-Right Content (Study)

Tubefilter: The YouTube Radicalization Pipeline Exists, And It’s Driving Users Toward Increasingly Alt-Right Content (Study). “A new study out of Cornell University has found ‘strong evidence for radicalization among YouTube users,’ and concludes that viewers who consume ‘mild’ radical right-wing content (it cites Joe Rogan, a YouTuber with a talk show and 6.1 million subscribers, as a creator of such ‘mild’ content) often migrate to viewing much more radical alt-right content.”

Cornell Chronicle: Stonewall anniversary inspires digitized postcard collection

Cornell Chronicle: Stonewall anniversary inspires digitized postcard collection. “Postcards from the past can deliver important lessons for the present, according to Brenda Marston, curator of the Cornell Human Sexuality Collection. Through a grants program, she collaborated with faculty members in digitizing early-20th century postcards of cross-dressers in Europe and the United States as an important resource for scholars of gender and sexuality studies, performance studies, language and literature.”

Cornell University: Research examines intent behind Facebook posts

Cornell University: Research examines intent behind Facebook posts. “Why do we share posts on Facebook? Are we seeking factual information, like the name of the plant taking over the front yard? Are we expressing frustration while seeking sympathy? Is it pure narcissism or narcissism by proxy, via our children? Is it bragging, or bragging’s sneaky cousin, humblebragging? Or is it something worse?”

Newswise: Cornell team, EPA to partner on emissions big data project

Newswise: Cornell team, EPA to partner on emissions big data project. “ITHACA, N.Y. – A team from Cornell University associate professor Max Zhang’s lab will work with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) over the next year on a machine learning model designed to predict fossil fuel emissions. The project was a winning entry in the EPA-sponsored EmPOWER Air Data Challenge.”

EurekAlert: To win online debates, social networks worth a thousand words

EurekAlert: To win online debates, social networks worth a thousand words. “Want to win an argument online? Bolstering your social network may be more helpful than rehearsing your rhetorical flourishes. According to Cornell researchers, social interactions are more important than language in predicting who is going to succeed at online debating. However, the most accurate model for predicting successful debaters combines information about social interactions and language, the researchers found.”

Cornell University: Scientists propose bird conservation plan based on eBird data

Cornell University: Scientists propose bird conservation plan based on eBird data. “An international team of scientists used eBird, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s global citizen science database, to calculate how to sufficiently conserve habitat across the Western Hemisphere for all the habitats these birds use throughout their annual cycle of breeding, migration and overwintering. The study provides planners with guidance on the locations and amounts of land that must be conserved for 30% of the global populations for each of 117 bird species that migrate to the Neotropics (Central and South America, the Caribbean and southern North America).”

Cornell Chronicle: Study uses neural networks to define Dada

Cornell Chronicle: Study uses neural networks to define Dada. “To make a Dadaist poem, artist Tristan Tzara once said, cut out each word of a newspaper article. Put the words into a bag and shake. Remove the words from the bag one at a time, and write them down in that order. This ‘bag of words’ method is not entirely different from how artificial intelligence algorithms identify words and images, breaking them down into components one step at a time. The similarity inspired Cornell researchers to explore whether an algorithm could be trained to differentiate digitized Dadaist journals from non-Dada avant-garde journals – a formidable task, given that many consider Dada inherently undefinable.”

Cornell University: Freedom on the Move launches database of fugitives from American slavery

Cornell University: Freedom on the Move launches database of fugitives from American slavery. “Freedom on the Move (FOTM), an online project devoted to fugitives from slavery in North America, is enlisting the help of the public to create a database for tens of thousands of advertisements placed by enslavers who wanted to recapture self-liberating Africans and African-Americans…. The free, open-source site has been designed to be accessible to the public. Users can quickly set up an account and begin working with digitized versions of the advertisements. Users transcribe the text of an advertisement and then answer questions about the ad and the person it describes. They can choose to transcribe ads from a particular state or specific time period, depending on their areas of interest.” I’m sure you’ve heard of this project before – it looks like I mentioned it in RB back in 2016 – but now it has officially launched.