Cornell University: Seven projects awarded 2018 digitization grants

Cornell University: Seven projects awarded 2018 digitization grants. “Seasoned documents and artifacts are starting fresh digital lives through the Grants Program for Digital Collections in Arts and Sciences, which is funding seven projects this year. Launched in 2010, the program supports faculty members and graduate students in creating online collections vital for their own and for general scholarship.”

Cornell University: Empathy project goes online

Cornell University: Empathy project goes online. “Since its launch in September 2016, the Cornell Race and Empathy Project has recorded, archived and shared the everyday stories of Cornellians that evoke racial empathy. The physical incarnation of the project – a cozy listening booth shaped like a stylized ear – is showing wear and tear and will have to be retired. To continue fostering the ability to identify and understand the feelings of someone of a different background, the project has evolved into an online presence.”

Cornell University: Online collection captures Sri Lankan village life

Cornell University: Online collection captures Sri Lankan village life. “‘Depicting the Sri Lankan Vernacular’ comprises more than 500 images and originates from the research of Bonnie MacDougall ’62, M.A. ’65, Ph.D. ’73, professor emerita in the College of Architecture, Art and Planning. MacDougall’s work in Mimure, in the Knuckles mountains of Sri Lanka, spanned more than 50 years and her entire academic career.”

All About Birds: Here’s How To Use The New Migration Forecast Tools From BirdCast

All About Birds: Here’s How To Use The New Migration Forecast Tools From BirdCast. “Migration is the best time to be a bird watcher. Twice a year, hordes of birds travel thousands of miles to grace your home turf for a few days or weeks. But they don’t come in a steady stream—more like a cascade of arrivals coming in flurries and pauses. That’s why even during peak migration, some days are dead while others are packed with new arrivals. Now, our BirdCast project can help you know when those flurries are about to arrive, so you can plan when to get up early. They’ve boiled down decades of migration science, coupled it with real-time weather data, and created two simple tools: a 3-day migration forecast, and an up-to-the-moment replay of migration activity.”

Cornell Chronicle: New ‘Tomato Expression Atlas’ dives deep into the fruit’s flesh

Cornell Chronicle: New ‘Tomato Expression Atlas’ dives deep into the fruit’s flesh. “From fried green tomatoes to pizza pie, the world savors the tomato across many stages of ripeness, each with its unique qualities. How a fruit ripens has long been an important question for breeders, and the subject of an extensive and fruitful collaboration involving researchers at Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI), Cornell University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).”

Myanmar: Myanmar’s Hidden Genocide Was Shaped by Hate-Mongering Facebook Memes, Cornell Profs Say

Cornell Sun: Myanmar’s Hidden Genocide Was Shaped by Hate-Mongering Facebook Memes, Cornell Profs Say. “‘It seems so far, that this is a genocide carried out with impunity,’ Prof. Magnus Fiskesjö, anthropology, said, discussing the geopolitical ramifications of the Rohingya Crisis in Myanmar at a panel discussion concluding Rohingya Week at Cornell. Panelists on Thursday analyzed the current political state of Myanmar as a result of attacks on Rohingya Muslims by the Myanmar military. Fiskesjö — who has long worked with issues concerning ethnic minorities in Myanmar — discussed the majority public opinion in Myanmar, against the Rohingya and how the genocide has ‘been shaped and helped by Facebook.'”

Cornell: Online trade card exhibit sheds light on Victorian food and wares

Cornell: Online trade card exhibit sheds light on Victorian food and wares. “A new online exhibition from Cornell University Library offers insights into life in the Victorian era through illustrated trade cards. These small, colorful advertisements, hawking everything from agricultural equipment to housewares, became valued novelties in an era when most printing was limited to black and white. The cards were avidly collected, traded and frequently mounted in albums, and today they provide information about the food, trends, habits and fads of the late 19th century.”