All About Birds: Here’s How To Use The New Migration Forecast Tools From BirdCast

All About Birds: Here’s How To Use The New Migration Forecast Tools From BirdCast. “Migration is the best time to be a bird watcher. Twice a year, hordes of birds travel thousands of miles to grace your home turf for a few days or weeks. But they don’t come in a steady stream—more like a cascade of arrivals coming in flurries and pauses. That’s why even during peak migration, some days are dead while others are packed with new arrivals. Now, our BirdCast project can help you know when those flurries are about to arrive, so you can plan when to get up early. They’ve boiled down decades of migration science, coupled it with real-time weather data, and created two simple tools: a 3-day migration forecast, and an up-to-the-moment replay of migration activity.”

Cornell Chronicle: New ‘Tomato Expression Atlas’ dives deep into the fruit’s flesh

Cornell Chronicle: New ‘Tomato Expression Atlas’ dives deep into the fruit’s flesh. “From fried green tomatoes to pizza pie, the world savors the tomato across many stages of ripeness, each with its unique qualities. How a fruit ripens has long been an important question for breeders, and the subject of an extensive and fruitful collaboration involving researchers at Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI), Cornell University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).”

Myanmar: Myanmar’s Hidden Genocide Was Shaped by Hate-Mongering Facebook Memes, Cornell Profs Say

Cornell Sun: Myanmar’s Hidden Genocide Was Shaped by Hate-Mongering Facebook Memes, Cornell Profs Say. “‘It seems so far, that this is a genocide carried out with impunity,’ Prof. Magnus Fiskesjö, anthropology, said, discussing the geopolitical ramifications of the Rohingya Crisis in Myanmar at a panel discussion concluding Rohingya Week at Cornell. Panelists on Thursday analyzed the current political state of Myanmar as a result of attacks on Rohingya Muslims by the Myanmar military. Fiskesjö — who has long worked with issues concerning ethnic minorities in Myanmar — discussed the majority public opinion in Myanmar, against the Rohingya and how the genocide has ‘been shaped and helped by Facebook.'”

Cornell: Online trade card exhibit sheds light on Victorian food and wares

Cornell: Online trade card exhibit sheds light on Victorian food and wares. “A new online exhibition from Cornell University Library offers insights into life in the Victorian era through illustrated trade cards. These small, colorful advertisements, hawking everything from agricultural equipment to housewares, became valued novelties in an era when most printing was limited to black and white. The cards were avidly collected, traded and frequently mounted in albums, and today they provide information about the food, trends, habits and fads of the late 19th century.”

Cornell: Twitter followers use friendships to fight fake news

Cornell: Twitter followers use friendships to fight fake news. “New Cornell University research offers hope that fake news and false rumors that reverberate around the Internet can be quashed. When Twitter users tweet a false rumor, they are more than twice as likely to accept correction if it comes from a mutual follower – someone they follow who also follows them – compared with when they are corrected by someone with whom they have no Twitter relationship, according to a study published this week in Political Communication.”

Cornell: Three projects awarded 2017 digitization grants

Cornell Chronicle: Three projects awarded 2017 digitization grants. “Since its inception in 2010, the Grants Program for Digital Collections in Arts and Sciences has helped to digitize items in Cornell’s collections, from punk music flyers to historic glacial images of Alaska and Greenland to Japanese woodblocks. For 2017, three projects were chosen from 14 applications.”

Cornell: Law Library database makes more legal scholarship available

Cornell: Law Library database makes more legal scholarship available. “The Cornell Law Library is partnering in the development and management of LawArXiv, a new online database of legal scholarship that aims to make important research more widely available to scholars, legal researchers and the public. LawArXiv is a free, open access repository for legal scholarship, maintained and owned by legal scholars and law librarians.”