Coda Story: Social media companies are facing pressure to start archiving war crimes evidence. How will that work?

Coda Story: Social media companies are facing pressure to start archiving war crimes evidence. How will that work?. “Long before politicians caught on, Alexa Koenig, the executive director of the Human Rights Center at UC Berkeley, was working on how social media can be used as evidence in international courts — and how companies can do a better job of preserving it. In the report Digital Lockers: Archiving Social Media Evidence of Atrocity Crimes, Koenig and her team outlined how social media platforms can transform from ‘accidental and unstable archives for human rights content’ to vaults of evidence accessible to investigators and prosecutors. Going a step further, the team at the Human Rights Center created a framework for using digital open source information in international courts.”

Missouri Independent: Appeals court hears arguments over Greitens’ use of self-destructing text message app

Missouri Independent: Appeals court hears arguments over Greitens’ use of self-destructing text message app. “A panel of state appeals court judges heard arguments last week over whether former Gov. Eric Greitens and his staff used self-destructing text-message apps in 2017 to illegally circumvent Missouri’s transparency laws. While Greitens was still serving as governor, it was revealed he and his staff were using a text-messaging app called Confide. The app allows someone to send a text message that vanishes without a trace after it is read. It also prevents anyone from saving, forwarding, printing or taking a screenshot of the message.”

Dissection by TikTok: Johnny Depp, Amber Heard trial posts are making accidental influencers out of some, targets out of others (CNN)

CNN: Dissection by TikTok: Johnny Depp, Amber Heard trial posts are making accidental influencers out of some, targets out of others. “Sophie Doggett, whose TikTok was previously populated by videos on everyday things such as herself or her pets, posted to her TikTok account on April 25 a clip of Heard’s lawyer asking a question of a witness and then immediately objecting to the response. It is one of many moments in the trial that has been seized upon by people like Doggett, as clips of testimony and references to the case have pervaded TikTok in a way that no trial has before…. Doggett, who paired the clip to playful music, said she gained 30,000 followers seemingly overnight from the post which has, to date, been viewed more than 5 million times.”

ABA Journal: New database tracks gender-based violence sentencing decisions in the Pacific

ABA Journal: New database tracks gender-based violence sentencing decisions in the Pacific. “Among the data compiled for each country, the TrackGBV Dashboard highlights contentious factors in gender-based violence cases that could discriminate against survivors when used in mitigation by the court. These include gender stereotyping; customary practices, such as forgiveness ceremonies; and other factors, such as a perpetrator’s religious activities.” The database currently contains information about Samoa, Fiji, and Papua New Guinea. Other Pacific nations will be added in the future.

Court Hands Journalists a Big Freedom of Information Act Win: Gun Data Access (CityBeat)

CityBeat: Court Hands Journalists a Big Freedom of Information Act Win: Gun Data Access. “Reveal, the Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR), originally sued for records in November 2017. The Department of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) never responded. ATF’s gun tracing database lists 6.8 million firearms linked to criminal activity. Reveal sought records for any gun traced back to law enforcement ownership. When Congress passed the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) in 1966, modern databases did not exist. ATF argued that a search query exporting the results amounted to a ‘new’ record, which agencies aren’t required to disclose under the FOIA statute. The court disagreed.”

Politico: Court rebukes Justice Department move in Hawaii quarantine case

Politico: Court rebukes Justice Department move in Hawaii quarantine case. “A judge appointed by President Donald Trump has rebuffed the administration’s bid to bolster a lawsuit challenging Hawaii’s strict quarantine rules for those arriving from out-of-state. The unexpected move by U.S. District Court Judge Jill Otake in Honolulu appears to be the first serious judicial resistance to the drive that Attorney General William Barr announced in April to scrutinize state and local lockdown measures aimed at containing the coronavirus.”

State of Maryland: Appellate court case information now available on Maryland Judiciary Case Search

State of Maryland: Appellate court case information now available on Maryland Judiciary Case Search. “The Maryland Judiciary has expanded its public access database, Maryland Judiciary Case Search, to include remote access to case information from the Court of Appeals (COA) and the Court of Special Appeals (COSA), in addition to existing access to cases in the trial courts. The appellate case information is now available online. Case Search now contains COA case information from term year 2015 to present and COSA case information from term year 2016 to present.”