The Verge: Emoji are showing up in court cases exponentially, and courts aren’t prepared

The Verge: Emoji are showing up in court cases exponentially, and courts aren’t prepared. “Bay Area prosecutors were trying to prove that a man arrested during a prostitution sting was guilty of pimping charges, and among the evidence was a series of Instagram DMs he’d allegedly sent to a woman. One read: ‘Teamwork make the dream work’ with high heels and money bag emoji placed at the end. Prosecutors said the message implied a working relationship between the two of them. The defendant said it could mean he was trying to strike up a romantic relationship. Who was right?”

Lancashire Post (England): Here’s how comments on social media comments can hinder court cases

Lancashire Post (England): Here’s how comments on social media comments can hinder court cases. “The rise of social media has presented a new problem for the legal system and one it is still grappling with. That’s why in 2013, the then attorney general Dominic Grieve, announced plans to discourage social media users on Facebook and Twitter from jeopardising court cases by publishing potentially prejudicial comments.”

Free Law Project: Announcing PACER Docket Alerts for Journalists, Lawyers, Researchers, and the Public

Free Law Project: Announcing PACER Docket Alerts for Journalists, Lawyers, Researchers, and the Public. “Today we are thrilled to announce the general availability of PACER Docket Alerts on CourtListener.com. Once enabled, a docket alert will send you an email whenever there is a new filing in a case in PACER.”

CNET: Twitter may see a white nationalist in court (because a judge said so)

CNET: Twitter may see a white nationalist in court (because a judge said so). “Twitter is trying to combat harassment, but it may have gone too far. That’s the preliminary opinion from a California superior court judge who rejected the social network’s bid to dismiss a lawsuit by white nationalist Jared Taylor and his American Renaissance group — meaning Taylor may have his day in court.”

Miami Herald: Do Trump’s tweets contaminate 9/11 trial? War court judge to decide.

Miami Herald: Do Trump’s tweets contaminate 9/11 trial? War court judge to decide.. “President Donald Trump’s incendiary remarks about military justice stirred a dramatic exchange in a hearing Thursday for the accused conspirators of the 9/11 attacks, with defense lawyers arguing that the commander-in-chief exerted unlawful influence. At issue are Trump’s remarks on Twitter and in person about the decision to give no prison time to Army deserter Bowe Bergdahl and to urge the death penalty on a man who had not yet been charged for driving a van through a New York City bike path, killing eight people.”

Library of Congress: Historical Supreme Court Cases Now Online

Library of Congress: Historical Supreme Court Cases Now Online. “More than 225 years of Supreme Court decisions acquired by the Library of Congress are now publicly available online – free to access in a page image format for the first time. The Library has made available more than 35,000 cases that were published in the printed bound editions of United States Reports (U.S. Reports). United States Reports is a series of bound case reporters that are the official reports of decisions for the United States Supreme Court dating to the court’s first decision in 1791 and to earlier courts that preceded the Supreme Court in the colonial era. The Library’s new online collection offers access to individual cases published in volumes 1-542 of the bound edition. This collection of Supreme Court cases is fully searchable. Filters allow users to narrow their searches by date, name of the justice authoring the opinion, subject and by the main legal concepts at issue in each case. PDF versions of individual cases can be viewed and downloaded.”

Baltimore Sun: Police officers’ names disappear from Maryland court case search database

Baltimore Sun: Police officers’ names disappear from Maryland court case search database. “The names of arresting officers and other law enforcement authorities involved in cases have been removed from the state’s searchable public court database. Officers names vanished sometime Thursday from cases the officers were involved with. There was no announcement from the Maryland Judiciary, which did not immediately return messages seeking comment.”