Slate: Justice, Livestreamed

Slate: Justice, Livestreamed. “The defense lawyer sits in his office—with the defendant, wearing a mask, at a desk behind him—as he takes turns with the prosecutors in questioning the witness, screen-sharing documents at various intervals. This is what court looks like in many parts of the country these days, and in some states, it’s available on YouTube. If you tire of Alcalá’s virtual courtroom, you can jump over to elsewhere in Texas, where child welfare cases are being streamed. Or you could click to Wisconsin or Michigan, where defendants join Zoom via video from the county jails and judges breeze through preliminary hearings and dole out sentences for parole violations.”

The Verge: Alleged Twitter teen hacker’s hearing got zoombombed big time

The Verge: Alleged Twitter teen hacker’s hearing got zoombombed big time. “Judge Christopher Nash spent more time rapidly force-ejecting trolls than he did delivering his decision — which, by the way, was to keep Clark’s bail at $725,000, over six times the $117,000 in bitcoin he’s said to have gotten from the Twitter scam. While the judge did have to approve each attendee that joined, there was no way for him to tell from their usernames that they weren’t journalists or well-meaning members of the public, and he explained that Florida is supposed to allow them to attend.”

Bloomberg Law: Zoom Courts Will Stick Around as Virus Forces Seismic Change

Bloomberg Law: Zoom Courts Will Stick Around as Virus Forces Seismic Change. “Virtual court proceedings will probably outlive the Covid-19 pandemic, as even skeptical judges and lawyers say that they’ve made depositions, oral arguments, and jury selection much more efficient. Courts forced to accelerate years of innovation into weeks may never go back to how they did business before the pandemic, according to interviews with more than 30 state and federal judges, lawyers and court staff in 16 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. The embrace of technology is a revolution for many courts that have historically resisted it.”

AP: Courts straining to balance public health with public access

AP: Courts straining to balance public health with public access. “After her son was arrested for allegedly throwing rocks at police during a protest over racial injustice, Tanisha Brown headed to the courthouse in her California hometown to watch her son’s arraignment. She was turned away, told the courthouse was closed to the public because of coronavirus precautions. A day later, the Kern County Superior Court in Bakersfield posted a notice on its website explaining how the public could request special permission from judicial officers to attend court proceedings. But problems with public access have persisted, according to a federal lawsuit filed Friday on behalf of Brown and several others who have been unable to watch court sessions.”

Lancashire Post (England): Here’s how comments on social media comments can hinder court cases

Lancashire Post (England): Here’s how comments on social media comments can hinder court cases. “The rise of social media has presented a new problem for the legal system and one it is still grappling with. That’s why in 2013, the then attorney general Dominic Grieve, announced plans to discourage social media users on Facebook and Twitter from jeopardising court cases by publishing potentially prejudicial comments.”

South China Morning Post: Hong Kong courts must open up about their work, and this means joining social media

South China Morning Post: Hong Kong courts must open up about their work, and this means joining social media. “Cliff Buddle says judges have been attacked for recent rulings, but scant attention is given to the reasoning behind judgments. To educate the public, the judiciary should get on social media platforms and even consider a bold move Britain has made – allowing filming in courts.”