TechCrunch: Building a search tool for state court data and analytics, Trellis adds Alon Shwartz as co-founder

TechCrunch: Building a search tool for state court data and analytics, Trellis adds Alon Shwartz as co-founder. “Trellis Research, the Los Angeles based startup building out a search and analytics tool for state court data, has raised $4.4 million in a new round of funding, and added Alon Shwartz as a technical co-founder.”

Reason: @UnsealieCourt, a New Twitter Feed for News About Public Access to Court Records

Reason: @UnsealieCourt, a New Twitter Feed for News About Public Access to Court Records. “I’ve been researching this subject for several years now, and I’ve litigated about a dozen such cases, from California and Washington to Florida and Vermont (no Maine yet). I often blog about such matters, and now I’ve set up a special feed, @UnsealieCourt (pardon the pun, if it is pardonable), for news updates on the subject.”

The Washington Post: Should the public pay a dime for access to court records?

The Washington Post: Should the public pay a dime for access to court records?. “The federal judiciary charges 10 cents per page to pull up court files from its online record repository. The fees can add up quickly, and users must consider whether each click to view a public record is worth the cost. But a lawsuit in court Monday in Washington challenges the government’s paywall to search online for case documents through the service known as PACER, an acronym for Public Access to Court Electronic Records.”

Government Technology: Vermont Attorneys Leverage Open Source Expungement Plug-In

Government Technology: Vermont Attorneys Leverage Open Source Expungement Plug-In. “A Vermont Code for America brigade, Code for BTV, designed a Google Chrome extension to scrape data from criminal dockets found on the state’s legacy court database to autofill expungement and record sealing petitions.”

Politico: The Federal Courts Are Running An Online Scam

Politico: The Federal Courts Are Running An Online Scam. “The U.S. federal court system rakes in about $145 million annually to grant access to records that, by all rights, belong to the public. For such an exorbitant price—it can cost hundreds of dollars a year to keep up with an ongoing criminal case—you might think the courts would at least make it easy to access basic documents. But you’d be wrong. The millions of dollars the courts have reaped in user fees have produced a website unworthy of the least talented of Silicon Valley garage programmers; 18 years since its online birth, PACER remains a byzantine and antiquated online repository of legal information.”

SwissInfo: Study finds Big Data eliminates confidentiality in court judgements

SwissInfo: Study finds Big Data eliminates confidentiality in court judgements. “Swiss researchers have found that algorithms that mine large swaths of data can eliminate anonymity in federal court rulings. This could have major ramifications for transparency and privacy protection.”

Rapid City Journal: South Dakotans will soon be able to access court records from any computer

Rapid City Journal: South Dakotans will soon be able to access court records from any computer. “If a South Dakotan wants to see public court records, they can only do that by looking them up on computer at a state courthouse during work hours between Monday and Friday…. So to help improve access to court records, the UJS is currently piloting a program that will eventually allow the public to see records from any computer, said Greg Sattizahn, administrator of the South Dakota Unified Judicial System. The website will be similar to the PACER website, which lets people view and download federal court records for a fee.”