The courts never closed: Historical Society of the NY Courts launches digital archive (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle: The courts never closed: Historical Society of the NY Courts launches digital archive. “The Historical Society of the New York Courts has launched ‘Dispensing Justice from a Distance,’ its digital archive of nearly 40 interviews with judges and court staff (including public safety and tech support), documenting their real-time experiences to keep the courts open, both virtually and in person, during the months of lockdown in New York. A timeline tracks the court system’s major milestones during the pandemic with images and documents to complete the record.”

Court News Ohio: New Platform Provides Path to Accessible Sentencing Data

Court News Ohio (which for some reason doesn’t have a encrypted connection, so you might get a warning): New Platform Provides Path to Accessible Sentencing Data. “The Ohio Criminal Sentencing Commission unveiled a new website to help courts implement a uniform sentencing entry system, which will lead to the development of a statewide criminal sentencing database. It will be called the Ohio Sentencing Data Platform, or OSDP.”

AP: Tennessee Supreme Court Full Case Records Now Online

AP: Tennessee Supreme Court Full Case Records Now Online. “The opinions have long been available electronically, but the associated case files were stored in more than 10,000 boxes in the attic of the Capitol building, according to a news release from the Administrative Office of the Courts. For more than a decade, Library and Archive staff has been cleaning and indexing these records. Today, around 85% of the collection is available online.”

UK Government: Boost for open justice as court judgments get new home

UK Government: Boost for open justice as court judgments get new home. “The website will host thousands of court judgments, saving time and money for lawyers, judges, academics, journalists, students and members of the public who require them for vital case preparation or research purposes. Judicial Review rulings, European case law, commercial judgments and many more cases of legal significance from the High Court, Upper Tier Tribunal, and the Court of Appeal will be readily available to anyone from April 2022.”

Free Law Project: Incorporate magistrate judges from 1990 to 2021

From the Free Law Project on GitHub: Incorporate magistrate judges from 1990 to 2021. From the resource page: “Every so often we ask the AO for stuff we can’t really get ourselves. In July of last year, we asked for a list of all magistrate judges, past and present. We already get regular updates from the FJC, but our hope was to get the historical data too. After many months of waiting, and to their immense credit, the AO did eventually deliver today. Attached please find roughly 1,000 magistrate judges that worked in the federal judiciary between 1990 and today.” I’m pretty sure that “the AO” in this case stands for the Administrative Office of the United States Courts.

News Tribune: Missouri Supreme Court launches bicentennial website celebrating courts

News Tribune: Missouri Supreme Court launches bicentennial website celebrating courts. “The new website, which features interactive timelines, offers users a chance to explore the early days of Missouri’s courts, discover how the courts expanded to address the state’s increased case volume, learn about additional changes in the 20th century and explore how Missouri’s courts reorganized to better serve citizens. Its final timeline on the judiciary’s much more recent history examines how embracing new technologies are helping the courts improve their service.”

AP: Russian hack brings changes, uncertainty to US court system

AP: Russian hack brings changes, uncertainty to US court system. “Trial lawyer Robert Fisher is handling one of America’s most prominent counterintelligence cases, defending an MIT scientist charged with secretly helping China. But how he’ll handle the logistics of the case could feel old school: Under new court rules, he’ll have to print out any highly sensitive documents and hand-deliver them to the courthouse. Until recently, even the most secretive material — about wiretaps, witnesses and national security concerns – could be filed electronically. But that changed after the massive Russian hacking campaign that breached the U.S. court system’s electronic case files and those of scores of other federal agencies and private companies.”

US Courts: Federal Courts Participate in Audio Livestream Pilot

US Courts: Federal Courts Participate in Audio Livestream Pilot. “Thirteen district courts around the country will livestream audio of select proceedings in civil cases of public interest next year as part of a two-year pilot program. Some of the courts already have begun making proceedings available via audio livestreams. The Northern District of Georgia on Dec. 7 streamed audio of a hearing on a presidential election-related lawsuit, which drew over 42,000 listeners. In September, the Eastern District of Missouri streamed audio of a status conference in the case of U.S. v. City of Ferguson. The remaining courts will be livestreaming by February 2021.”

Washington Post: Lawmakers are trying to create a database with free access to court records. Judges are fighting against it.

Washington Post: Lawmakers are trying to create a database with free access to court records. Judges are fighting against it.. “Leaders of the federal judiciary are working to block bipartisan legislation designed to create a national database of court records that would provide free access to case documents. Backers of the bill, who are pressing for a House vote in the coming days, envision a streamlined, user-friendly system that would allow citizens to search for court documents and dockets without having to pay. Under the current system, users pay 10 cents per page to view the public records through the service known as PACER, an acronym for Public Access to Court Electronic Records.”

Chicago Sun-Times: Threats to feds lead to more than 4 years in prison for man convicted in first pandemic jury trial

Chicago Sun-Times: Threats to feds lead to more than 4 years in prison for man convicted in first pandemic jury trial. “A jury convicted 40-year-old Robert Haas in August. His trial became a test run of sorts for new COVID-19 safety protocols at the Dirksen Federal Courthouse. Jurors were spread out beyond the traditional jury box, taking breaks and deliberating in a separate courtroom. Public seating was limited, and witnesses were asked to wipe down the witness stand after their testimony.”

ABA Journal: This Louisiana judge continues to innovate during the COVID-19 crisis

ABA Journal: This Louisiana judge continues to innovate during the COVID-19 crisis. “Judge Scott Schlegel’s history of utilizing technology in his Louisiana courtroom to make life easier for attorneys and members of the public has come in very handy during the COVID-19 pandemic. When the public health crisis forced the closure of Jefferson Parish courtrooms earlier this year, Schlegel contacted those he knows in the legal tech world for assistance in bringing to fruition a plan to remotely accept guilty pleas in criminal cases.”

The Donziger Exception: How SDNY’s First Covid-Age Criminal Trial Fell Apart (Courthouse News)

Courthouse News: The Donziger Exception: How SDNY’s First Covid-Age Criminal Trial Fell Apart. “Private lawyers tapped as prosecutors asked the defendant to foot the technology bill for holding the proceedings remotely. Witnesses from around the globe prepared to testify, and attorneys from across the country worried about how to best serve their client in New York. There would have been no jury. It was supposed to have been the first criminal trial in Manhattan Federal Court for the coronavirus age, but the plan fell apart — with the man on the dock complaining about a constitutional and public-health crisis in the making.”

StateTech Magazine: Tech Is Aiding Several Aspects of the Criminal Justice System During the Pandemic

StateTech Magazine: Tech Is Aiding Several Aspects of the Criminal Justice System During the Pandemic. “The coronavirus pandemic has upended all aspects of society, from how work gets done to social gatherings and how people greet one another. It has also posed a significant challenge to the criminal justice system, which has long relied on bringing people into close contact. That’s true for court proceedings, interviewing suspects and conducting parole checkups.”