Creative Commons: Introducing CC Accidenz Commons: An Open-Licensed Font

Creative Commons: Introducing CC Accidenz Commons: An Open-Licensed Font. “Since 2002, CC licenses—and the CC logo—have been used to share and make freely available billions of works in the Global Commons. CC has also grown to include an active Global Network, consisting of 41 local CC Chapters and over 450 members who use the logo to support their work. Due to this growth, we realized in 2018 that the original Akzidenz Grotesk font was not ideal for members of our Global Network to adapt and remix. We wondered: Can we develop an open-licensed Creative Commons font? Thanks to the kind support of a CC member, we did.”

Search Engine Journal: An Official Creative Commons WordPress Plugin Makes Content Attribution Easier

Search Engine Journal: An Official Creative Commons WordPress Plugin Makes Content Attribution Easier . “The plugin, simply called ‘Creative Commons’, is an upgraded version of the organization’s old plugin called WPLicense. Given that the old plugin wasn’t compatible with versions of WordPress beyond 3.8.1, it’s fair to say a new and/or updated plugin was overdue.”

PRWeb: Global Music Community Tribe of Noise Acquires Free Music Archive

PRWeb: Global Music Community Tribe of Noise Acquires Free Music Archive (PRESS RELEASE). “FMA and Tribe of Noise share many common interests in the music and creative industry. Both offer high quality, well curated music to media makers, focus on music composed and recorded by independent artists and use Creative Commons as their core, open licensing model.”

Creative Commons: Looking forward and back: Five years at Creative Commons

Creative Commons: Looking forward and back: Five years at Creative Commons. “This month, I’ll mark five years as CEO at Creative Commons. That makes me the longest-serving CEO in the organization’s history, and it’s also the longest I’ve served with the same job title. Every day I get to work with some of the brightest, most dedicated staff and community members in the open movement. Anniversaries are a good time to reflect, and as we all arrive home from our annual CC Summit in Lisbon, I wanted to share a few reflections on where we’ve come from, and where we’re headed.”

PR Newswire: Introducing MHz Curationist – Framing the World We Share (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Introducing MHz Curationist – Framing the World We Share (PRESS RELEASE.) ” MHz Curationist is an emergent, distilled and searchable CMS database of Creative Commons, Open Access, and Public Domain content serving as an interdisciplinary and ever-growing library, publisher and 21st-century online museum.” I browsed a little but I’m still not sure what this is all about. The press release makes it sound interesting, but I’m a bit nonplussed.

Announcing: The Public Domain Song Anthology (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Announcing: The Public Domain Song Anthology. “You realize something needs to be done and you are the only one crazy enough to do it. This happened when my law and music worlds collided: A D.C. restaurant stopped booking live music due to license demands from a Performance Rights Organization. I suggested that bands could play ‘originals,’ and play from a book of Public Domain popular music – but no such book exists – even though as of Jan. 1, 2019 more music is entering the Public Domain. I realized I knew the very best music, law, and library people to create such a book, of 370 songs, and to give it away – in text and musical notation software, free for creative use and adaptation – as an Open Educational Resource.”

CC Search: A New Vision, Strategy & Roadmap for 2019 (Creative Commons)

Creative Commons: CC Search: A New Vision, Strategy & Roadmap for 2019. “At the Grand Re-Opening of the Public Domain at the Internet Archive, I teased a new product vision for CC Search that gets more specific than our ultimate goal of providing access to all 1.4 billion CC licensed and public domain works on the web. I’m pleased to present that refined vision, which is focused on building a product that promotes not just discovery, but reuse of openly-licensed and public domain works. We want your feedback in making it a reality.”