New York Times: This Tool Could Protect Artists From A.I.-Generated Art That Steals Their Style

New York Times: This Tool Could Protect Artists From A.I.-Generated Art That Steals Their Style. “Say, for example, that [artist Karla] Ortiz wants to post new work online, but doesn’t want it fed to A.I. to steal it. She can upload a digital version of her work to Glaze and choose an art type different from her own, say abstract. The tool then makes changes to Ms. Ortiz’s art at the pixel-level that Stable Diffusion would associate with, for example, the splattered paint blobs of Jackson Pollock.”

Stanford University: What DALL-E Reveals About Human Creativity

Stanford University: What DALL-E Reveals About Human Creativity. “To explore just how creative these models really are and what they can teach us about the nature of our own innovative propensities, we asked four authorities on artificial intelligence, the brain, and creativity (and we also asked GPT-3, a language-generating model that’s a close cousin to DALL-E) to explain what they think of DALL-E’s capabilities and artistic potential.”

News@Northeastern: The AI Portrait App Lensa Has Gone Viral, But It Might Be More Problematic Than You Think

News@Northeastern: The AI Portrait App Lensa Has Gone Viral, But It Might Be More Problematic Than You Think. “The way AI applications like Lensa work is that developers and engineers use large data sets to train a model to recognize and learn certain characteristics or styles. Once the model learns that information, it can look at a new picture and reproduce that image in one of the styles it’s been trained to reproduce. In this case, Lensa’s app has been trained on artwork created and posted by artists across the internet, and some artists claim this not only devalues their own work, churning out 50 images at a fraction of the cost of a commission, but it is potentially appropriating their work, including their signature.”

InPublishing: Mslexia Completes Digital Archive Back To 1999

InPublishing: Mslexia Completes Digital Archive Back To 1999. “Published four times a year, Mslexia includes what’s new in creativity and publishing, advice and inspirations, debate, opinions, and poetry and prose, as well as a directory of competitions, editors and publishers on the lookout for fresh talent. Its mission is to help women express themselves and get their writing noticed: in print, online and in performance.”

The age of invention: patents show differences between younger and older inventors (Brandeis NOW)

Brandeis NOW: The age of invention: patents show differences between younger and older inventors. “The study… examined more than 3 million U.S. patents filed from 1976 to 2000 to identify certain attributes, and then analyzed them based on the age of the filers. The research found older inventors are more likely to rely on their knowledge and experience, and build on novel applications of past inventions – what psychologists call crystallized intelligence – to develop a patent. Younger inventors are more likely to submit patents that are forward-looking and rely on abstract reasoning and novel problem-solving – all traits of fluid intelligence.”

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: AI is plundering the imagination and replacing it with a slot machine

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: AI is plundering the imagination and replacing it with a slot machine. “These tools represent the complete corporate capture of the imagination, that most private and unpredictable part of the human mind. Professional artists aren’t a cause for worry. They’ll likely soon lose interest in a tool that makes all the important decisions for them. The concern is for everyone else. When tinkerers and hobbyists, doodlers and scribblers—not to mention kids just starting to perceive and explore the world—have this kind of instant gratification at their disposal, their curiosity is hijacked and extracted.” And here is my periodic reminder that I include articles in this section (opinion) with which I do not necessarily agree.

How-To Geek: What Happens if You Let a 4-Year-Old Use an AI Art Generator?

How-To Geek: What Happens if You Let a 4-Year-Old Use an AI Art Generator?. “That’s the amazing thing about the many AI image generators that are available now. Obviously, there are limits to what the AI can do, but you are basically free to enter anything and see what happens. It’s a playground for your imagination. I decided to let my 4-year-old have some fun in that playground.”

UVA Today: Finally, The Real Answer Why Your Best Ideas Come While Showering

UVA Today: Finally, The Real Answer Why Your Best Ideas Come While Showering. “Zac Irving, a University of Virginia assistant professor of philosophy, explains in new co-written research why a wandering mind sometimes comes up with creative solutions to a problem when a person is engaged in a ‘mindless’ task. The secret appears to be that the task at hand isn’t truly mindless. A moderate level of engagement is required.”

Government of Pennsylvania: PA Council On The Arts Unveils Free, Innovative Digital Platform For Teaching Artists And Older Adults

Government of Pennsylvania: PA Council On The Arts Unveils Free, Innovative Digital Platform For Teaching Artists And Older Adults. “Today, Karl Blischke, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts (PCA), announced the launch of the Academy for Creative Aging, a free, digital platform that offers a certificate of completion for teaching artists and on-demand video lessons for older adults.” I tried accessing a couple of the on-demand lessons and they worked fine, so I don’t think this is restricted to Pennsylvania.

MIT: AI system makes models like DALL-E 2 more creative

MIT: AI system makes models like DALL-E 2 more creative. “The internet had a collective feel-good moment with the introduction of DALL-E, an artificial intelligence-based image generator inspired by artist Salvador Dali and the lovable robot WALL-E that uses natural language to produce whatever mysterious and beautiful image your heart desires. Seeing typed-out inputs like ‘smiling gopher holding an ice cream cone’ instantly spring to life clearly resonated with the world. Getting said smiling gopher and attributes to pop up on your screen is not a small task.”

UGA Today: Did my computer say it best?

UGA Today: Did my computer say it best?. “With autocorrect and auto-generated email responses, algorithms offer plenty of assistance to help people express themselves. But new research from the University of Georgia shows people who rely on computer algorithms for assistance with language-related, creative tasks didn’t improve their performance and were more likely to trust low-quality advice.”

Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation: IPLC Launches the Design Card Decks for Ideation and Exploration Web Archive

Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation: IPLC Launches the Design Card Decks for Ideation and Exploration Web Archive. “The Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation is pleased to announce the launch of the Design Card Decks for Ideation and Exploration Web Archive, curated by librarians at the University of Pennsylvania and Princeton University. Card decks are used in design fields as a game-based methodology for ideation and stakeholder participatory collaboration.”

New York Times: Can We Resist the Age of the Algorithm?

New York Times: Can We Resist the Age of the Algorithm?. “People can choose to be ruled by algorithmic thinking without running a literal program to figure out what’s popular. And the fact that we have a specific form of technology that makes it easier to squash risk and creativity is hard to separate from wider trends toward sclerosis, repetition, what I spent an entire book calling decadence.”

CSUF: Artificial Intelligence Has Fundamentally Changed Branding, Says New Study

CSUF: Artificial Intelligence Has Fundamentally Changed Branding, Says New Study. “Decades ago, the practice of branding and marketing relied heavily on creativity. Today, that is no longer the case according to research led by Cal State Fullerton Professor of Marketing Chiranjeev Kohli. With the advent of artificial intelligence — machines that think like humans — and a growing amount of data on consumer purchase behavior, Kohli has conducted research to shed light on what he describes as a fundamental change in marketing and branding.”

Ideas on mute? Study: Remote meetings dampen brainstorming (Associated Press)

Associated Press: Ideas on mute? Study: Remote meetings dampen brainstorming. “Researchers watched 745 pairs of engineers in five different countries try to come up with creative ideas for using a Frisbee or bubble wrap. Those in the same room generated on average one more idea, which is about 17% more than those in remote meetings. And those in-person ideas were judged by outside experts to be more creative, the study found.”