Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation: IPLC Launches the Design Card Decks for Ideation and Exploration Web Archive

Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation: IPLC Launches the Design Card Decks for Ideation and Exploration Web Archive. “The Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation is pleased to announce the launch of the Design Card Decks for Ideation and Exploration Web Archive, curated by librarians at the University of Pennsylvania and Princeton University. Card decks are used in design fields as a game-based methodology for ideation and stakeholder participatory collaboration.”

New York Times: Can We Resist the Age of the Algorithm?

New York Times: Can We Resist the Age of the Algorithm?. “People can choose to be ruled by algorithmic thinking without running a literal program to figure out what’s popular. And the fact that we have a specific form of technology that makes it easier to squash risk and creativity is hard to separate from wider trends toward sclerosis, repetition, what I spent an entire book calling decadence.”

CSUF: Artificial Intelligence Has Fundamentally Changed Branding, Says New Study

CSUF: Artificial Intelligence Has Fundamentally Changed Branding, Says New Study. “Decades ago, the practice of branding and marketing relied heavily on creativity. Today, that is no longer the case according to research led by Cal State Fullerton Professor of Marketing Chiranjeev Kohli. With the advent of artificial intelligence — machines that think like humans — and a growing amount of data on consumer purchase behavior, Kohli has conducted research to shed light on what he describes as a fundamental change in marketing and branding.”

Ideas on mute? Study: Remote meetings dampen brainstorming (Associated Press)

Associated Press: Ideas on mute? Study: Remote meetings dampen brainstorming. “Researchers watched 745 pairs of engineers in five different countries try to come up with creative ideas for using a Frisbee or bubble wrap. Those in the same room generated on average one more idea, which is about 17% more than those in remote meetings. And those in-person ideas were judged by outside experts to be more creative, the study found.”

Arizona State University: Innovative brainstorming method created by ASU staff for staff expands to public

Arizona State University: Innovative brainstorming method created by ASU staff for staff expands to public. “Starting in the spring semester, students can take a one-credit course in the ASU Spark Method through University College. And people outside ASU can take a professional-development certification course online. The next session begins Jan. 11. The ASU Spark Method, developed in 2018, is a conversational design tool that’s not only intended to encourage brainstorming and ideation from every team member, but also work through the tangled issues of how to throw away processes that don’t work and start a new way forward.”

PsyPost: An increased awareness of death during the COVID-19 pandemic may have spurred a surge in creativity in the workplace

PsyPost: An increased awareness of death during the COVID-19 pandemic may have spurred a surge in creativity in the workplace. “Pondering about death amid the COVID-19 crisis may have helped employees come up with creative responses to the pandemic, according to findings published in the Journal of Applied Psychology. U.S. employees who reported increased reflection about death and the meaning of life during the pandemic also reported subsequent increases in creativity at work.”

Google Blog: Explore the Cradle of Creativity on Google Arts & Culture

Google Blog: Explore the Cradle of Creativity on Google Arts & Culture. “The Cradle of Creativity, a new project on Google Arts & Culture, explores how creativity evolved in Africa from rock art to contemporary brush strokes. In collaboration with the Yemisi Shyllon Museum of Art (YSMA) in Nigeria and the Origins Centre in South Africa, you can now explore 50 expertly-curated stories, featuring over 60 high-resolution Gigapixel images of artworks digitized using the Google Art Camera, 17 Street View virtual tours and, for teachers and students, a dedicated lesson plan.”

Penn State News: What was really the secret behind Van Gogh’s success?

Penn State News: What was really the secret behind Van Gogh’s success?. “By using artificial intelligence to mine big data related to artists, film directors and scientists, the researchers discovered this pattern is not uncommon but, instead, a magical formula. Hot streaks, they found, directly result from years of exploration (studying diverse styles or topics) immediately followed by years of exploitation (focusing on a narrow area to develop deep expertise).”

RiotAct: National Film and Sound Archive preserving lockdown’s creative collection

RiotAct: National Film and Sound Archive preserving lockdown’s creative collection. “Among some of the quirky bits and pieces preserved for posterity in the NFSA’s ‘Creativity in the Time of COVID’ project – which has been running throughout Australia’s arduous lockdowns – you’ll find the YouTube hit, Nat’s What I Reckon, which takes cooking shows in a bizarre direction thanks to rocker host Nat. You can also find internet hit Love in Lockdown, an unlikely romantic comedy created by TV comedians Robyn Butler and Wayne Hope.” Nat’s What I Reckon sounded fun so I took a look. It’s like YOU SUCK AT COOKING goes to Hell via Australia. I subscribed immediately.

Dazed: Looking for a creative spark after lockdown? Try this inspiration generator

Dazed: Looking for a creative spark after lockdown? Try this inspiration generator. “Adobe has created a new tool to help designers beat the blank. Called the Inspiration Generator and available in English, German, and French, the tool creates unique creative briefs for the user to respond to. The idea is that anyone with the skills to make something, but lacking a sense of direction or purpose, can create for the sake of it. Some of the oblique strategies we were presented with: ‘adventurous surfer movie poster’ and ‘chic florist magazine cover’.”

HYPEBEAST: The Artist’s Guide to Staying Creative at Home

HYPEBEAST: The Artist’s Guide to Staying Creative at Home. “The current lockdown measures in place across the world have had a huge impact on the art world. Whether it’s by closing galleries such as the Tate indefinitely or postponing exhibitions, the art industry has had to adapt quickly to social distancing measures as a result of the coronavirus crisis. Those changes have also affected individual artists, many of whom are unable to access their studio spaces or are deprived of inspiration while isolating at home. We caught up with four different artists to discuss how quarantine has impacted their practice, where they are looking for inspiration, and their top tips for staying creative in these trying times.”

Variety: Cannes Lions Goes Digital with ‘Lions Live’

Variety: Cannes Lions Goes Digital with ‘Lions Live’. “The platform will run throughout June under the theme ‘Creativity Matters,’ and activity will coincide with the original dates of the Lions, June 22-26. The initiative will be free to use for all…. Lions Live will include masterclasses and ‘hangouts’ with creative industry legends, as well as lectures from speakers previously confirmed for the festival, and professional classes and learning modules. ”

New York Times: Is It Possible to Feel Creatively Connected Without Social Media?

This may be the first time I’ve ever linked to an advice column in ResearchBuzz. Here we go, from the New York Times: Is It Possible to Feel Creatively Connected Without Social Media?. “It has become a thing for some to use Instagram as a kind of CV, and there are stories of those who have found gallery representation on the basis of their feeds. At the end of the day, though, I suspect that by recusing yourself from social media, what you’re mostly missing out on is the illusion of community, rather than an actual, supportive, real-life one, which you’ve already taken steps to build. Let’s face it: Social media is better at fostering solipsism than it is at inspiring or showcasing creative work.”

The Scholarly Kitchen: If My AI Wrote this Post, Could I Own the Copyright?

The Scholarly Kitchen: If My AI Wrote this Post, Could I Own the Copyright?. “We are now at another inflection point with a new technology, artificial intelligence (AI), and similar questions about the boundaries of intellectual property rights are coming to the forefront. There could be profound implications for the publishing and scientific communities, which are becoming key sources of training data for artificial intelligence systems, as well as for publishers themselves, potentially becoming reliant on artificial intelligence for creation, curation and engagement of new content.” Good comments too.