New York Times: Social Media Attack That Set Off a Seizure Leads to an Arrest

New York Times: Social Media Attack That Set Off a Seizure Leads to an Arrest. “When the journalist Kurt Eichenwald opened an animated image sent to him on Twitter last December, the message ‘You deserve a seizure for your posts’ appeared in capital letters along with a blinding strobe light. Mr. Eichenwald, who has epilepsy, has said he immediately suffered a seizure. On Friday, the F.B.I. said it had arrested and charged a man for sending the electronic file, though the agency did not immediately release the suspect’s name or specify the criminal charges.”

DOJ: U.S. Charges Russian FSB Officers and Their Criminal Conspirators for Hacking Yahoo and Millions of Email Accounts

From the US Department of Justice: U.S. Charges Russian FSB Officers and Their Criminal Conspirators for Hacking Yahoo and Millions of Email Accounts. “The defendants used unauthorized access to Yahoo’s systems to steal information from about at least 500 million Yahoo accounts and then used some of that stolen information to obtain unauthorized access to the contents of accounts at Yahoo, Google and other webmail providers, including accounts of Russian journalists, U.S. and Russian government officials and private-sector employees of financial, transportation and other companies. One of the defendants also exploited his access to Yahoo’s network for his personal financial gain, by searching Yahoo user communications for credit card and gift card account numbers, redirecting a subset of Yahoo search engine web traffic so he could make commissions and enabling the theft of the contacts of at least 30 million Yahoo accounts to facilitate a spam campaign.”

Engadget: Facebook admits its image screening fell short

Engadget: Facebook admits its image screening fell short. “To say that Facebook has some egg on its face right now would be an understatement. The social network not only didn’t take down some sexualized images of children, but reported the BBC when it drew these images to its attention. However, the company now says it has turned a corner. Facebook’s Simon Milner tells the UK’s Home Affairs Committee that the incident showed the company’s moderation system ‘was not working.’ The offending photos have since been taken down, he says, adding that the process should be fixed.”

Police Department in Kansas Starts Facebook Feature That’s Basically “Where’s Waldo” For Fugitives

A police department in Kansas has started a new Facebook feature that’s basically “Where’s Waldo” for fugitives. I’m not even kidding. “This week the Halstead Police Department launched a new, and inventive, way to deal with outstanding bench warrants issued by Halstead Municipal Court. It’s called ‘Find the Fugitive,’ and the plan is to post to the department Facebook page each week.”

Spammergate: The Fall of an Empire (MacKeeper)

MacKeeper: Spammergate: The Fall of an Empire. “Today we release details on the innerworkings of a massive, illegal spam operation. The situation presents a tangible threat to online privacy and security as it involves a database of 1.4 billion email accounts combined with real names, user IP addresses, and often physical address. Chances are that you, or at least someone you know, is affected.”

Miami Herald: US police agencies with their own DNA databases stir debate

Miami Herald: US police agencies with their own DNA databases stir debate. “Dozens of police departments around the U.S. are amassing their own DNA databases to track criminals, a move critics say is a way around regulations governing state and national databases that restrict who can provide genetic samples and how long that information is held.”