TechCrunch: Police roll up crime networks in Europe after infiltrating popular encrypted chat app

TechCrunch: Police roll up crime networks in Europe after infiltrating popular encrypted chat app. “Hundreds of alleged drug dealers and other criminals are in custody today after police in Europe infiltrated an encrypted chat system reportedly used by thousands to discuss illegal operations. The total failure of this ostensibly secure method of communication will likely have a chilling effect on the shadowy industry of crime-focused tech.”

BBC: Iran arrests men for ‘selling babies on Instagram’

BBC: Iran arrests men for ‘selling babies on Instagram’. “Three men have been arrested in Iran on suspicion of trying to sell two babies on Instagram. Tehran’s police chief, Brig-Gen Hossein Rahimi, said one of the children was 20 days old. The other was two months old. The babies had already been bought for up to $500 (£400), and were being resold for between $2,000 and $2,500.”

ProPublica: He Removed Labels That Said “Medical Use Prohibited,” Then Tried to Sell Thousands of Masks to Officials Who Distribute to Hospitals

ProPublica: He Removed Labels That Said “Medical Use Prohibited,” Then Tried to Sell Thousands of Masks to Officials Who Distribute to Hospitals . “Lucas Rensko was making money through a popular handyman-for-hire app called TaskRabbit, doing odd jobs and delivering groceries, when he picked up a task that led him to a leaky-roofed warehouse on a tattered road in northwest San Antonio. Inside, a man named Jaime Rivera had set up long tables where five or six other ‘Taskers’ earning about $20 an hour were ripping Chinese masks out of plastic bags and stuffing them into new ones that were identical but for one potentially deadly difference. The old packages were labeled in all caps ‘MEDICAL USE PROHIBITED,’ meaning not to be used by doctors and nurses who need the strongest protection from tiny particles carrying the novel coronavirus. The new bags, intended to make their way to Texas hospitals, simply omitted that warning.”

Dallas News: Feds say Murphy man lied about having a business to pocket a $1.6 million Paycheck Protection loan

Dallas News: Feds say Murphy man lied about having a business to pocket a $1.6 million Paycheck Protection loan. “The wedding-planning business his wife owned went bust in 2018. But that didn’t stop Fahad H. Shah from using the company to apply for a $1.6 million federal Paycheck Protection Program loan, prosecutors say. Shah, 44, of Murphy was charged last Thursday with fraud, accused of using the PPP loan proceeds to pay off the couple’s mortgage, buy a Tesla vehicle and boost his E-Trade investment account by $550,000, court records show.”

BBC: Nigeria police rescue 300 workers ‘locked in rice factory’

BBC: Nigeria police rescue 300 workers ‘locked in rice factory’. “Police in Nigeria have rescued 300 people they say were locked in a rice-processing factory and forced to work throughout a coronavirus lockdown. From the end of March the men were allegedly not allowed to leave the mill in the northern city of Kano.”

BBC: Former eBay executives charged with cyber-stalking

BBC: Former eBay executives charged with cyber-stalking. “Six former eBay executives and staff have been charged with cyber-stalking in a campaign against a couple who ran a newsletter critical of the company. Prosecutors allege the harassment included sending the couple live cockroaches, a bloody Halloween mask and a funeral wreath, as well as threatening messages.”

Philadelphia Inquirer: The FBI used a Philly protester’s Etsy profile, LinkedIn, and other internet history to charge her with setting police cars ablaze

Philadelphia Inquirer: The FBI used a Philly protester’s Etsy profile, LinkedIn, and other internet history to charge her with setting police cars ablaze. “More than two weeks after that climactic May 30 moment, federal authorities say they’ve identified the arsonist as 33-year-old Philadelphia massage therapist Lore Elisabeth Blumenthal by following the intricate trail of bread crumbs she left through her social media history and online shopping patterns over the years. The path took agents from Instagram, where amateur photographers also captured shots of the masked arsonist, to an Etsy shop that sold the distinctive T-shirt the woman was wearing in the video. It led investigators to her LinkedIn page, to her profile on the fashion website Poshmark, and eventually to her doorstep in Germantown.”

Bleeping Computer: Extortionists threaten to destroy sites in fake ransom attacks

Bleeping Computer: Extortionists threaten to destroy sites in fake ransom attacks. “Scammers are targeting website owners with blackmail messages asking them to pay ransoms between $1,500 and $3,000 in bitcoins to avoid having their sites’ databases leaked and their reputation destroyed. As the fraudsters falsely claim, they exfiltrate the databases to attacker-controlled servers using credentials harvested after exploiting a vulnerability found within the sites’ software.”

Greater Manchester illegal raves: Man dies, woman raped and three stabbed (BBC)

BBC: Greater Manchester illegal raves: Man dies, woman raped and three stabbed. “A 20-year-old man has died, a woman has been raped and three people have been stabbed during two illegal ‘quarantine raves’ that attracted 6,000 people. Thousands flocked to Daisy Nook Country Park and Carrington in Greater Manchester late on Saturday.”

Northwestern University: Legal scholar’s new website offers a picture of the criminal justice system

Northwestern University: Legal scholar’s new website offers a picture of the criminal justice system. “Leigh Bienen, a senior lecturer at Northwestern Law, recently launched ‘2003 Chicago Murders,’ a compendium of numbers, system identifiers, dates and other information about 140 death-eligible murders in Cook County, all cases where an indictment for murder was returned during the period of Jan. 1, 2003, to June 30, 2003. The cases are divided into three subgroups based on the length of the sentence imposed. All of the data on the website, which comes from public records, includes names of the defendants and victims, defendants’ zip code and age at offense, method of killing and many more details. The data can be downloaded and analyzed by the user. “

Department of Justice: New Jersey Man Arrested For $45 Million Scheme To Defraud And Price Gouge New York City During COVID-19 Pandemic

Department of Justice: New Jersey Man Arrested For $45 Million Scheme To Defraud And Price Gouge New York City During COVID-19 Pandemic. “Geoffrey S. Berman, the United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, and Margaret Garnett, the Commissioner of the New York City Department of Investigation (‘DOI’), announced the arrest of RONALD ROMANO for attempting to deceive and price gouge New York City (the ‘City’) into paying him and his co-conspirators approximately $45 million for personal protective equipment that ROMANO did not possess and was not authorized to sell. ROMANO committed this scheme in an attempt to exploit NYC as it was trying to manage the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and obtain these resources to help protect the lives of hospital and other frontline workers.”

ABC News: Florida man allegedly kidnapped teen to drive him through coronavirus checkpoint

ABC News: Florida man allegedly kidnapped teen to drive him through coronavirus checkpoint. “According to Monroe County Sheriff’s Office officials, Alexander Michael Sardinas, 37, of Tavernier, and a 43-year-old woman from Islamorada tried to enter the Florida Keys in a taxi on Thursday morning, but were turned away at the highway checkpoint for not having proper identification. The Florida Keys are closed to non-residents, due to COVID-19 concerns, through the end of May, and proof of residency is required to get through the checkpoint.”

FBI: FBI Warns of Child Sexual Abuse Material Being Displayed During Zoom Meetings

FBI: FBI Warns of Child Sexual Abuse Material Being Displayed During Zoom Meetings. “The COVID-19 crisis has caused many organizations and schools to conduct virtual meetings/events, some of which are open to the public. Additionally, links to many virtual events are being shared online, resulting in a lack of vetting of approved participants. During the last few months, the FBI has received more than 195 reports of incidents throughout the United States and in other countries in which a Zoom participant was able to broadcast a video depicting child sexual abuse material (CSAM). The FBI considers this activity to be a violent crime, as every time child sexual abuse material is viewed, the depicted child is re-victimized. Furthermore, anyone who inadvertently sees child sexual abuse material depicted during a virtual event is potentially a victim as well.”

NBC News: Singapore court sentences drug suspect to death on Zoom videoconferencing app

NBC News: Singapore court sentences drug suspect to death on Zoom videoconferencing app. “Singapore has sentenced a drug suspect to death on the popular videoconferencing app Zoom because of the city-state’s coronavirus lockdown, in a move slammed by a human rights group as callous and inhumane. Defense lawyer Peter Fernando said the Supreme Court announced the penalty to his client, Punithan Genasan from Malaysia, in a virtual hearing Friday. Genasan was in jail, while Fernando and prosecutors participated in the hearing from different locations.”

New York Times: Son Stabs Father 15 Times on Zoom Call, Killing Him, Prosecutors Say

New York Times: Son Stabs Father 15 Times on Zoom Call, Killing Him, Prosecutors Say. “A 32-year-old Long Island man was arrested and charged with murder on Thursday after fatally stabbing his father more than a dozen times while he was on a Zoom video chat with about 20 people, the authorities said. The father, Dwight Powers, 72, had been participating in the Zoom call at his home on Dixon Avenue in Amityville, N.Y., when he was attacked by his son Thomas Scully-Powers, just after noon on Thursday, the Suffolk County Police Department said.”