Ars Technica: FBI recovers $14M from bogus business account wire transfers

Ars Technica: FBI recovers $14M from bogus business account wire transfers. “Federal authorities announced Monday that they had “disrupted” what they call ‘Business Email Compromise’ schemes, which involve a malicious actor sending a phishing email and somehow convincing employees with access to a company’s financial credentials to transfer money fraudulently. The FBI added that $2.4 million dollars was seized, while $14 million in ‘fraudulent wire transfers’ was recovered.”

BBC News: The Twitter crime mystery that gripped Spain

BBC News: The Twitter crime mystery that gripped Spain. “‘Police! I have just resolved a crime via Twitter! You need to deal with it immediately,’ wrote a Spanish social media user going by the name of Mr Brightside on Saturday afternoon. He then proceeded to unpick what appeared to be a murder case, in great detail over 100 tweets. With limited followers, he had not been expecting much reaction. He says he is still overwhelmed by what happened next.”

The Telegraph: Database aims to counter surge in luxury watch thefts

The Telegraph: Database aims to counter surge in luxury watch thefts . “The increased targeting of luxury watches by ruthless street robbers and smash and grab gangs has led to a dramatic rise in the number of stolen timepieces being registered with a crime prevention database. The surge in thefts – which has seen more than £1m of watches stolen in central London in the first quarter of this year alone – has led to a rush of owners using the Watch Register in a bid to trace their items.”

Scottish Legal News: Google comes under fire for revealing rape victims in searches

Scottish Legal News: Google comes under fire for revealing rape victims in searches. “Google is enabling users to uncover the identities of rape victims whose anonymity is guaranteed under law, The Times reports. Searches for criminals and alleged attackers in a number of prominent sexual assault cases reveal the names of women they have been convicted of attacking or accused of attacking.” You may remember that a similar issue was reported in Canada last September.

Mapping Out Missing and Murdered Native Women: ‘I Would Want My Story to Have Meaning’ (Rewire)

Rewire: Mapping Out Missing and Murdered Native Women: ‘I Would Want My Story to Have Meaning’. “[Annita] Lucchesi, a cartographer and doctoral student at the University of Lethbridge’s Cultural, Social and Political Thought program, recently created and published an online database logging cases of missing and murdered indigenous women and two spirit people. She began gathering information for the database in 2015 from news articles, online databases, lists compiled by Native advocates and community members, family members, social media, federal and state missing persons databases, and law enforcement records gathered through public records requests. She personally vets all information she receives before adding it to the database. Cases date from 1900 to the present; as of April 2018, she has found 2,501 cases of missing and murdered women and two spirit people in the United States and Canada.”

New York Times: How Fake Mark Zuckerbergs Scam Facebook Users Out of Their Cash

New York Times: How Fake Mark Zuckerbergs Scam Facebook Users Out of Their Cash. “A Facebook notification on Gary Bernhardt’s phone woke him up one night last November with incredible news: a message from Mark Zuckerberg himself, saying that he had won $750,000 in the Facebook lottery. ‘I got all excited. Wouldn’t you?’ said Mr. Bernhardt, 67, a retired forklift driver and Army veteran in Ham Lake, Minn. He stayed up until dawn trading messages with the person on the other end. To obtain his winnings, he was told, he first needed to send $200 in iTunes gift cards.”

Engadget: Investigators used online DNA databases to hunt Golden State Killer

Engadget: Investigators used online DNA databases to hunt Golden State Killer. “Yesterday several police departments in California announced the arrest of the ‘Golden State Killer,’ who killed a dozen people between 1978 and 1986 and has been accused of over 50 rapes. At the time, investigators said DNA played a role in identifying former Auburn, CA police officer Joseph James DeAngelo, and today went a step further with the explanation.”