Forbes: Why Don’t Social Media Companies Stop Violent Imagery?

Forbes: Why Don’t Social Media Companies Stop Violent Imagery?. “The intense media coverage this past week of the so-called ‘Facebook killer’ drew attention once again to the horrific ways in which social media platforms can provide a global audience to people who wish to do themselves or others grievous harm and indeed begs the question of whether in the absence of such instant fame would at least some of these acts have been prevented?”

BBC: ‘Facebook killer’ Steve Stephens found dead after car chase

BBC: ‘Facebook killer’ Steve Stephens found dead after car chase. “A man suspected of randomly shooting a grandfather and posting video of it to Facebook has taken his own life. Police tracked down Steve Stephens after he was spotted by employees at a drive-thru McDonald’s in Pennsylvania, who stalled his order and rang 911.”

NBC News: Crackdowns on Social Media Accounts Backfire by Driving up Demand

NBC News: Crackdowns on Social Media Accounts Backfire by Driving up Demand. “Facebook shut down as many as 30,000 fake accounts in the past week — but that’s unlikely to hurt the multi-million-dollar spam industry. In fact, since Facebook’s post-election housecleaning, it’s become even more lucrative for spammers to pump out ‘inauthentic accounts.’ The asking price on the black market for 1,000 fake accounts used to be $20, but security changes by the social network giant only succeeded in driving up prices.”

Gizmodo: Police Searching for This Man Who Allegedly Posted a Murder Live on Facebook

Gizmodo: Police Searching for This Man Who Allegedly Posted a Murder Live on Facebook. “The Cleveland Police Department is searching for a man named Steve ‘Stevie Steve’ Stephens in connection with the murder of an elderly man that was broadcast live on Stephens’ Facebook page. In earlier posts, he claimed to be perpetrating an ‘Easter day slaughter.’ “

Gizmodo: How to Spot a Link You Shouldn’t Click On

Gizmodo: How to Spot a Link You Shouldn’t Click On. “Even as our tech gets increasingly sophisticated and intelligent, sometimes it’s falling for the oldest tricks in the book that breach the security walls we’ve put in place—like clicking on dodgy links or shady attachments that we shouldn’t. You don’t have to get tripped up by these simplest of scams though, if you know what you’re looking for.” Covers lots of scenarios, though I would have liked more external tools.

MIT Technology Review: The FBI Shut Down a Huge Botnet, but There Are Plenty More Left

MIT Technology Review: The FBI Shut Down a Huge Botnet, but There Are Plenty More Left. “Last Friday, at the request of the FBI, Spanish police officers arrested Russian hacker Peter Levashov while he holidayed in Barcelona with his family. The reason: Levashov is thought to be better known as Peter Severa, a cybercriminal who controlled the Kelihos botnet. Now, the Justice Department has announced that at the time he was seized the FBI simultaneously began the task of dismantling his nefarious creation.”

State Scoop: Portland’s new crime map shows how far data transparency has come

State Scoop: Portland’s new crime map shows how far data transparency has come. “Cities once merely dumped their data online without a plan. Today, portals like this one are shaping policy and guiding grander designs in community engagement and policing.”