Hindustan Times: Delhi cops google HT story, catch ‘super’ thief who targeted rich in Vasant Kunj

Hindustan Times: Delhi cops google HT story, catch ‘super’ thief who targeted rich in Vasant Kunj. “A thief who travelled to ‘work’ in a Chevrolet Cruze car and only targeted houses in the affluent south Delhi neighbourhoods, such as Vasant Kunj, was arrested on Monday after police used Google search to identify him.”

Get Started: FBI warns of spreading W-2 email theft scheme (Phys.org)

Phys.org: Get Started: FBI warns of spreading W-2 email theft scheme. “The IRS is warning businesses about a sharp increase in email phishing scams involving employees’ W-2 forms—scams that can put staffers’ Social Security numbers and other critical information in the hands of thieves. The government said 200 businesses, public schools, universities, Native American governments and nonprofits were victimized by these scams during this year’s tax filing season, resulting in the theft of several hundred thousand employees’ data. That’s up from 50 in 2016, when the scam first appeared.”

BBC: Chinese ‘cyber-court’ launched for online cases

BBC: Chinese ‘cyber-court’ launched for online cases. “China has launched a digital “cyber-court” to help deal with a rise in the number of internet-related claims, according to state media. The Hangzhou Internet Court opened on Friday and heard its first case – a copyright infringement dispute between an online writer and a web company.”

The Atlantic: Solving a Murder Mystery With Ancestry Websites

The Atlantic: Solving a Murder Mystery With Ancestry Websites. “On August 9, 1977, David Roth drove his mother’s car to Silver Lake. It was a hot day for Washington, the temperature slinking toward the high 80s, so he’d decided to go for a swim. He headed about 20 minutes north of Lynnwood, where he slept on his mom’s couch, and parked at a beach just off the road. But his plans changed when he noticed a girl trying to hitch a ride.”

Wired: When Government Rules by Software, Citizens Are Left in the Dark

Wired: When Government Rules by Software, Citizens Are Left in the Dark. “IN JULY, SAN Francisco Superior Court Judge Sharon Reardon considered whether to hold Lamonte Mims, a 19-year-old accused of violating his probation, in jail. One piece of evidence before her: the output of algorithms known as PSA that scored the risk that Mims, who had previously been convicted of burglary, would commit a violent crime or skip court. Based on that result, another algorithm recommended that Mims could safely be released, and Reardon let him go. Five days later, police say, he robbed and murdered a 71-year old man. On Monday, the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office said staffers using the tool had erroneously failed to enter Mims’ prior jail term. Had they done so, PSA would have recommended he be held, not released.”

FedScoop: The FBI teamed up with 18F to build an open crime data resource

FedScoop: The FBI teamed up with 18F to build an open crime data resource. “The FBI wants to make national crime data more accessible, and the recently released Crime Data Explorer, built in partnership with 18F, is the agency’s latest attempt at this goal. The interest isn’t new — decades ago it led to the creation of the Uniform Crime Reporting Project, which the bureau was tasked with collecting data for in 1930. But modern technology enables better reporting and more transparency than UCR’s standard yearly reports. And so, in the fall of 2016, the FBI began building the Crime Data Explorer.”