BuzzFeed News: This Genealogy Database Helped Solve Dozens Of Crimes. But Its New Privacy Rules Will Restrict Access By Cops.

BuzzFeed News: This Genealogy Database Helped Solve Dozens Of Crimes. But Its New Privacy Rules Will Restrict Access By Cops.. “Days after BuzzFeed News revealed that the website GEDmatch had bent its published rules to allow police in Utah to search for relatives of the perpetrator of a violent assault, the website changed its terms of service so that users now have to explicitly opt in for their DNA profiles to be included in law enforcement searches.”

Republic TV: Google Location Data Helped Delhi Police Uncover Murder Case Of A Senior Citizen, Two Arrested

Republic TV: Google Location Data Helped Delhi Police Uncover Murder Case Of A Senior Citizen, Two Arrested. “Officials first looked into call detail records (CDRs). However, police made very little progress there onwards. Hence, Police then decided to look onto Google location data of one of the accused. The data showed that the accused had visited the Lucknow Expressway on March 2.”

New York Times: Sooner or Later Your Cousin’s DNA Is Going to Solve a Murder

New York Times: Sooner or Later Your Cousin’s DNA Is Going to Solve a Murder. “Using an unconventional technique that relies on DNA submitted to online genealogy sites, investigators have solved dozens of violent crimes, in many cases decades after they hit dead ends. Experts believe the technique could be used to revive investigations into a vast number of cases that have gone cold across the country, including at least 100,000 unsolved major violent crimes and 40,000 unidentified bodies.”

New York Times: Google’s Sensorvault Is a Boon for Law Enforcement. This Is How It Works.

New York Times: Google’s Sensorvault Is a Boon for Law Enforcement. This Is How It Works.. “Law enforcement officials across the country have been seeking information from a Google database called Sensorvault — a trove of detailed location records involving at least hundreds of millions of devices worldwide, The New York Times found. Though the new technique can identify suspects near crimes, it runs the risk of sweeping up innocent bystanders, highlighting the impact that companies’ mass collection of data can have on people’s lives.”

New York Times: He Spent 36 Years Behind Bars. A Fingerprint Database Cleared Him in Hours.

New York Times: He Spent 36 Years Behind Bars. A Fingerprint Database Cleared Him in Hours.. “All it took was for technicians in a crime lab to run the fingerprints collected at the scene of a rape through a national database. Within hours, the experts had established a match with a serial rapist. But that was last week — almost four decades after the attack on Dec. 9, 1982, when a woman was raped and stabbed in her home in a well-to-do neighborhood in Baton Rouge, La. A different man, Archie Williams, went to prison for the crime, even though it was known at the trial that the fingerprints were not his.”

The Scotsman: Scots asked to take pictures of their footwear to catch criminals

The Scotsman: Scots asked to take pictures of their footwear to catch criminals. “The University of Dundee’s Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science (LRCFS) is undertaking the largest ever study into the variation in footwear marks made by the same shoes across different surfaces and activities so the variation observed can be used to explore links between the shoe and the mark it makes. To do this, they are asking thousands of individuals to take part in a large-scale citizen science project by taking pictures of their footwear and the marks they make.”