New-to-Me: Washington Prison History Project

I’m not sure how new this is but it’s new-to-me: the Washington Prison History Project. From the front page: “Welcome to the Washington Prison History Project, an online project documenting the history of prisoner activism and policy in our state. The site features a robust collection of prisoner-produced newspapers from the late 20th century; oral histories and testimonials about the Washington state prison system; research on local histories of punishment; and a text-adventure computer game designed inside a maximum security prison.”

National Institute of Corrections: New Council of State Governments Web Tool Provides Look at Legal, Regulatory Restrictions Against People who have Criminal Convictions

National Institute of Corrections: New Council of State Governments Web Tool Provides Look at Legal, Regulatory Restrictions Against People who have Criminal Convictions. “The new National Inventory of Collateral Consequences of Conviction resource (link is external), launched today – October 31, 2018 by the National Reentry Resource Center and The Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice Center, compiles thousands of state and federal statutes into a searchable database, making it easier to identify these obscure regulations that can be triggered by a particular conviction.”

Techdirt: California Police Officers Used Self-Destructing Messaging App For Years

Techdirt: California Police Officers Used Self-Destructing Messaging App For Years. “The Long Beach PD had more than 100 officers using TigerText to preemptively destroy possible public records and/or evidence. The use of self-destructing messages, if nothing else, violates record preservation laws. Depending on what disappeared into the ether, there’s a good chance criminal cases were also affected by the rolling destruction of communications.”

Journal of Blacks in Higher Education: University of Montana’s New Online Archive of Black Criminal Justice History in the State

Journal of Blacks in Higher Education: University of Montana’s New Online Archive of Black Criminal Justice History in the State. “The University of Montana has debuted a new online historical timeline that documents the history of African Americans in Montana relating to state law and the criminal justice system. The timeline, which includes entries from 1864 to 2018, includes archival photos, interpretive commentary and hundreds of individuals and events.”

University of Virginia: Mapping The Modern Death Sentence

University of Virginia: Mapping The Modern Death Sentence. “Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Law have collaborated on a new website that uses a data-driven, interactive map to illustrate the rapid decline of the issuance of the death sentence in the United States since 1991.”

Govtech: Will Florida’s Data Collection Bill Make It the Most Transparent State in the Nation?

Govtech: Will Florida’s Data Collection Bill Make It the Most Transparent State in the Nation?. “Florida will have the most transparent criminal justice system in the nation following new legislation aimed at improving data collection. The legislation establishes a framework for a new database that will track a defendant’s experience at each step of the criminal justice system — from arrest and bail proceedings to sentencing — and compare those outcomes through a searchable website available to the public.”

Bozeman Daily Chronicle (Montana): State launches new website to help with Marsy’s Law compliance

Bozeman Daily Chronicle (Montana) : State launches new website to help with Marsy’s Law compliance. “The new Web page, created by the Montana Department of Justice, will provide locations and contact information for county prosecutors, law enforcement agencies, county courts and victim advocacy and resource centers across Montana. It will also include a model Marsy’s Card, a document law enforcement and prosecutors can provide to victims that outlines their constitutional rights as well as contact information for law enforcement and victim advocacy.”