Chicago Sun-Times: Threats to feds lead to more than 4 years in prison for man convicted in first pandemic jury trial

Chicago Sun-Times: Threats to feds lead to more than 4 years in prison for man convicted in first pandemic jury trial. “A jury convicted 40-year-old Robert Haas in August. His trial became a test run of sorts for new COVID-19 safety protocols at the Dirksen Federal Courthouse. Jurors were spread out beyond the traditional jury box, taking breaks and deliberating in a separate courtroom. Public seating was limited, and witnesses were asked to wipe down the witness stand after their testimony.”

Law Society Gazette: Justice delayed is justice denied for clients in lockdown limbo

Law Society Gazette: Justice delayed is justice denied for clients in lockdown limbo. “No matter how long a criminal case goes on for, the mental anguish of being accused is unavoidable. The adversarial process which is already long and tortuous (the investigation stage alone can take years) is exacerbated by the Covid-19 delays and will take its toll on the most hardened of clients. Tragically for some it can be too much and I am not alone in representing clients who have sought to end their lives as a result of the unbearable pressures caused by an on-going criminal investigation.”

BBC: Charlie Hebdo trial suspended as suspect catches Covid-19

BBC: Charlie Hebdo trial suspended as suspect catches Covid-19. “The main suspect in the 2015 Charlie Hebdo attack in France has tested positive for Covid-19 and his trial has been suspended, lawyers say. Ali Reza Polat is accused of helping the militant Islamist attackers who killed 12 people at the satirical magazine four years ago. The presiding judge says 10 accused accomplices must be tested for the virus before the trial can resume.”

The Donziger Exception: How SDNY’s First Covid-Age Criminal Trial Fell Apart (Courthouse News)

Courthouse News: The Donziger Exception: How SDNY’s First Covid-Age Criminal Trial Fell Apart. “Private lawyers tapped as prosecutors asked the defendant to foot the technology bill for holding the proceedings remotely. Witnesses from around the globe prepared to testify, and attorneys from across the country worried about how to best serve their client in New York. There would have been no jury. It was supposed to have been the first criminal trial in Manhattan Federal Court for the coronavirus age, but the plan fell apart — with the man on the dock complaining about a constitutional and public-health crisis in the making.”

Omaha World-Herald: First Douglas County murder trial in months ends abruptly over apparent coronavirus case

Omaha World-Herald: First Douglas County murder trial in months ends abruptly over apparent coronavirus case. “The search for justice in an Omaha double-homicide case continues to be plagued by the novel coronavirus. Douglas County District Judge Marlon Polk declared a mistrial Monday in the case of Nyir Kuek after Kuek’s sister informed attorneys that she had tested positive for COVID-19.”

New York Times: Boston Marathon Bomber’s Death Sentence May Depend on What His Jurors Tweeted

New York Times: Boston Marathon Bomber’s Death Sentence May Depend on What His Jurors Tweeted. “During the days after bombs exploded at the Boston Marathon in 2013, killing and maiming people who had gathered to cheer on runners, a restaurant manager from Dorchester joined the chorus of heartbreak and outrage on Twitter.”

New York Times: Imagine Being on Trial. With Exonerating Evidence Trapped on Your Phone.

The New York Times: Imagine Being on Trial. With Exonerating Evidence Trapped on Your Phone.. “In America, citizens accused of crimes are supposed to have an advantage. The burden of proof is on prosecutors, and the government must turn over all its evidence to defendants, who have no reciprocal obligation. In practice, of course — and especially when defendants don’t have a lot of money — the government has the edge. Investigators can issue subpoenas, compel testimony and pressure defendants into pleas. Today, one way in which the deck is stacked against defendants involves technology.”

New Zealand Herald: Grace Millane’s killer named on social media and by overseas publications despite suppression orders

New Zealand Herald: Grace Millane’s killer named on social media and by overseas publications despite suppression orders. “Overseas news publications are naming the man convicted of Grace Millane’s murder, despite his name still being suppressed. And in New Zealand, the man has also been named on social media accounts leaving the police to issue a warning not to state his identity on any posts. The 27-year-old man was found guilty of killing the 21-year-old backpacker last night, in a unanimous decision by the jury.”

WRAL TechWire: Will Facebook fight court decision allowing access to private social media postings in murder trial?

WRAL TechWire: Will Facebook fight court decision allowing access to private social media postings in murder trial? . “The California Supreme Court has effectively ruled that the defense in a gang-related murder trial can obtain private postings from social media companies. The court on Wednesday lifted a stay of a ruling by the judge overseeing the San Francisco trial and noted that the judge’s findings strongly justify access in this case, the Los Angeles Times reported Friday.”

India Times: Google saves student from murder rap

India Times: Google saves student from murder rap. “A college student arrested last year for the alleged murder of an 11-year-old boy has managed to prove his innocence and get acquitted with the help of Google. Jai Pratap Singh, alias Mohit, was let off on Thursday by additional district and sessions judge Rajat Singh Jain, who also observed that the role of police in the case was suspicious.”