France24: French police announce arrest of ‘darknet’ paedophilia site operator

France24: French police announce arrest of ‘darknet’ paedophilia site operator. “French prosecutors said Monday that police had arrested a man suspected of operating paedophilia sites on secret ‘darknet’ internet networks providing pornographic videos and pictures to thousands of people worldwide. The 40-year-old arrested near the southwestern city of Bordeaux on July 7 was described by prosecutors as “one of the 10 most-wanted targets” of authorities fighting child sex crimes around the globe.”

US Department of Justice: Man Sentenced to 50 Years in Prison for Orchestrating Snapchat Sextortion Ring that Targeted Children

US Department of Justice: Man Sentenced to 50 Years in Prison for Orchestrating Snapchat Sextortion Ring that Targeted Children. “U.S. Attorney Ariana Fajardo Orshan for the Southern District of Florida, Special Agent in Charge George L. Piro of the FBI’s Miami Field Office, Chief W. Howard Harrison of the Planation Police Department, and Chief Dale Engle of the Davie Police Department, announced that Joseph Isaiah Woodson, Jr., 30, of Ashburn, Virginia, was sentenced yesterday to a total of 600 months in federal prison and a lifetime of supervised release by U.S. District Judge Jose E. Martinez, after having been convicted at trial of using the internet to target and extort children through sexual exploitation (‘sextortion’) and pornographic offenses.”

PR Newswire: Database of Mass Shooters Compiled by Hamline Students Released for Public Use

PR Newswire: Database of Mass Shooters Compiled by Hamline Students Released for Public Use (PRESS RELEASE). “On November 19, 2019, The Violence Project, a nonpartisan think tank, will publicly release the largest, most comprehensive database of mass shooters in the United States. This new database, funded by the National Institute of Justice, the research arm of the U.S. Department of Justice, was developed by professors Jillian Peterson and James Densley and a team of students at Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota. It includes 171 mass shooters from 1966 to 2019, each coded on 100 pieces of life history information.”

The Guardian: Campaign launched to catch ‘Europe’s most wanted women’

The Guardian: Campaign launched to catch ‘Europe’s most wanted women’. “Europe’s policing agency has launched a campaign to catch the continent’s most wanted female criminals. Europol’s new website, called the Crime Has No Gender campaign, reveals the faces of fugitives wanted by 21 EU countries in an interactive way. Eighteen of them are women.”

RFI: The 100-year horror of France’s most notorious serial killer unveiled

Part new, part new-to-me, from RFI: The 100-year horror of France’s most notorious serial killer unveiled. “On 12 April 1919, Paris police arrested Henri Désiré Landru, who went into history as France’s most notorious serial killer. Convicted of having murdered at least 11 people, including 10 women, he was guillotined in February 1922. Today, documents covering the Landru case are available online and offer a chilling picture of the life and times of the ‘French Bluebeard’.”

Dayton Daily News: Gov. Kasich signs bill to set up Ohio violent offender registry

Dayton Daily News: Gov. Kasich signs bill to set up Ohio violent offender registry. “Violent offenders will need to self-register — and annually re-register for a decade — under a bill signed Wednesday by Gov. John Kasich that will establish a database of Ohio’s released murderers and kidnappers.”

The Register: Back to school soon – for script kiddies as well as normal kids. Hackers peddle cybercrime e-classes via Telegram

The Register: Back to school soon – for script kiddies as well as normal kids. Hackers peddle cybercrime e-classes via Telegram . “Russian criminals have for some time now taught classes over the internet on how to rip off folks and credit card companies. Digital Shadows, which chronicled this trade last year, said this week there has been a shift over the past 12 months from publicizing these courses on marketplaces to attracting wannabe hackers via Telegram.”

The Citizen: When social media lets criminals get off scot-free

The Citizen (South Africa): When social media lets criminals get off scot-free. “Gauteng police recently appealed to the public to think twice before sharing pictures and CCTV footage of crime scenes or suspected criminals on social media. Social media was potentially a helpful tool in curbing crime, but often it winds up influencing and compromising identity parades, said Lyttelton police spokesman Captain Dave Miller. ‘Any subsequent identification parade can be invalid because it is then considered biased,’ said Miller.”

Wired: When YouTube Removes Violent Videos, It Impedes Justice

Wired: When YouTube Removes Violent Videos, It Impedes Justice. “When the International Criminal Court issued an arrest warrant for Mahmoud al-Werfelli in August for the war crime of murder in Libya, it marked a watershed moment for open-source investigations. For those of us who embrace the promise of the digital landscape for justice and accountability, it came as welcome validation that content found on Facebook and YouTube form a good deal of the evidence before the Court. But this relatively new path to justice is at risk of becoming a dead-end.”

Hindustan Times: Delhi cops google HT story, catch ‘super’ thief who targeted rich in Vasant Kunj

Hindustan Times: Delhi cops google HT story, catch ‘super’ thief who targeted rich in Vasant Kunj. “A thief who travelled to ‘work’ in a Chevrolet Cruze car and only targeted houses in the affluent south Delhi neighbourhoods, such as Vasant Kunj, was arrested on Monday after police used Google search to identify him.”

The Gleaner (Jamaica): Online Database Of Wanted People Being Prepared For May Roll Out

Jamaica is getting an online database of people wanted by law enforcement. “Jamaicans should by the end of this month have access to an online database showing people who are wanted by the police for various crimes. Head of the criminal investigation Branch, Assistant Commissioner of Police Ealan Powell, says the police are developing a comprehensive list of all wanted persons for widespread distribution.”

FBI Launches a New “Wanted” App

The FBI has launched a new “wanted” app. “The app allows the public to view, search, sort, filter, and bookmark the full range of information issued by the FBI. That includes pictures and descriptions of wanted fugitives, missing persons, crime suspects, deceased victims, and others the Bureau is seeking to locate or identify. The app is free and works on Apple and Android devices, including smartphones, iPads, and iPods. Depending on your device, it can be downloaded from the Apple App store or Google Play.”

The Guardian: Rising numbers of criminals are using Facebook to document their crimes

The Guardian: Rising numbers of criminals are using Facebook to document their crimes. “Facebook Live allows anyone to broadcast a video directly from their smartphone to the social network. Despite a wide-reaching advertising campaign urging people to use the feature to share heartwarming life moments, it’s gained a reputation for much grittier subject matter…”

New Database of People Who Died While in Legal Custody in Texas, 2005-2015

Now available: an online archive of people who died while within legal custody in Texas, 2005-2015. It’s important to note that this database is about all deaths, and not only deaths that occurred as a direct action of law enforcement. “The final product was culled from thousands of internal reports and includes names, time and place of death, cause of death, time in custody, and a description of the circumstances. Aided by web developers, Patrick Diaz and Vitaly Kezlya, and her husband, Robert Pinkard, [Amanda] Woog envisioned and created a website that’s well organized and cleanly designed.”

Forensic psychologists reveal why people are posting evidence to their crimes on Facebook and Snapchat

I have wondered about this a lot: Forensic psychologists reveal why people are posting evidence to their crimes on Facebook and Snapchat. “Across social media, people are using the platforms to showcase their crimes — with heartless selfies and humiliating clips of their victims. For all the crooks posting their own incriminating evidence on social media, forensic psychologists say a common thread ties them all together: an insatiable craving for attention.”