Intellectual humility: the importance of knowing you might be wrong (Vox)

Vox: Intellectual humility: the importance of knowing you might be wrong. “Julia Rohrer wants to create a radical new culture for social scientists. A personality psychologist at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Rohrer is trying to get her peers to publicly, willingly admit it when they are wrong. To do this, she, along with some colleagues, started up something called the Loss of Confidence Project. It’s designed to be an academic safe space for researchers to declare for all to see that they no longer believe in the accuracy of one of their previous findings. “

United States Politics and Policy: A new tool can help us determine which conspiracy theories are false and which might be true.

United States Politics and Policy: A new tool can help us determine which conspiracy theories are false and which might be true. . “Many or even most conspiracy theories are demonstrably false. But some, like Watergate, are true. How can we determine which are which? Drawing on his own experiences with conspiracy theorists, Stephan Lewandowsky writes that conspiratorial thinking is not necessarily truth-seeking behavior, but can often be a near-self destructive form of skepticism. We can use this skepticism, along with conspiracists’ tendency towards pattern-seeking and self-sealing reasoning, to flush out which are false, and which might be true after all.”

The Verge: How an upstart hacker collective is fighting back against misinformation in 2019

The Verge: How an upstart hacker collective is fighting back against misinformation in 2019. “With fake stories a seemingly permanent fixture of life online — and the threat of convincing fake videos gaining steam — it can be easy to despair. But even as the viral threat evolves, new antibodies are emerging. Amid fears that the boundaries between reality and fiction are dissolving, researchers have begun sketching out proposals to prevent it from disseminating. Drawing on experts from a variety of fields, advocates are putting together an organized effort to protect the information sphere from scammers and state-sponsored trolls.”

The Next Web: This study shows why people fall for fake online profiles

The Next Web: This study shows why people fall for fake online profiles. “Although social media companies have begun hiring more people and using artificial intelligence to detect fake profiles, that won’t be enough to review every profile in time to stop their misuse. As my research explores, the problem isn’t actually that people – and algorithms – create fake profiles online. What’s really wrong is that other people fall for them. My research into why so many users have trouble spotting fake profiles has identified some ways people could get better at identifying phony accounts – and highlights some places technology companies could help.”

FAQ: Do you think that an increase in algorithms is leading to a decline in human judgement? (Online Journalism Blog)

Online Journalism Blog: FAQ: Do you think that an increase in algorithms is leading to a decline in human judgement?. “The latest in my series of FAQ posts follows on from the last one, in response to a question from an MA student at City University who posed the question ‘Do you think that an increase in algorithmic input is leading to a decline in human judgement?’. Here’s my response.”

Quartz: YouTube’s autoplay function is helping convert people into Flat Earthers

Quartz: YouTube’s autoplay function is helping convert people into Flat Earthers. “The first time I watched a Flat Earther YouTube video, I was entranced. The theory was that Earth used to be populated by giant trees, and so any change in elevation on Earth was actually just giant tree stumps. It made so little sense that I needed to know more about the theory, so when YouTube automatically started playing another video after the first was complete, I continued watching. Then I sat through a third, and decided I should stop. Apparently, this is the path that has led many people towards believing flat earth theories.”