New York Times: The Accidental Media Critics of YouTube

New York Times Magazine: The Accidental Media Critics of YouTube. “Even in a world with no gatekeepers and limited moderation, a certain savvy will assert itself. YouTube even has its equivalents of tabloids and trade publications, covering salacious online drama or niche interests. But it’s the commentary YouTubers in particular who have become, in some cases, as popular as the stars they react to, leading to strange conflicts between fame and critical integrity — plus literal run-ins in the influencer-infested studios of Los Angeles.”

Slate: Art From 1923 Is About to Enter the Public Domain. According to Critics From 1923, Here’s the Worst of It

Slate: Art From 1923 Is About to Enter the Public Domain. According to Critics From 1923, Here’s the Worst of It. “The vast majority of art created in 1923 was terrible, just like any other year, and some of it should probably be left right where it is. To find out which newly-public-domain works from 1923 will benefit the public the least, we consulted with the people who know the art of 1923 best: Critics from 1923.”

Hollywood Reporter: Time’s Up Teaming With USC Annenberg Professor to Launch Diverse Critics Database

Hollywood Reporter: Time’s Up Teaming With USC Annenberg Professor to Launch Diverse Critics Database. “As stars and studios continue to call for more diverse film critics, Time’s Up and Annenberg Inclusion Initiative director Dr. Stacy L. Smith are stepping into the fray with a new database of diverse critics and journalists. Called CRITICAL, the forthcoming opt-in database, open to all, aims to connect underrepresented film critics and journalists with publicists, studios, film critics associations and talent. Over 200 critics and journalists have created profiles so far after being contacted by CRITICAL or friends who forwarded CRITICAL’s email about the initiative.”

‘Angry boredom’: early responses to Waiting for Godot showcased online (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Angry boredom’: early responses to Waiting for Godot showcased online. “Today, Waiting for Godot is the most celebrated of Samuel Beckett’s plays, but newly digitised material from the depths of the British Library shows how its first audiences responded in horror to its ‘lavatory references’, while some anticipated that ‘this ugly little jet of marsh-gas’ from ‘the late James Joyce’s secretary’ would soon be forgotten.”