Defence Procurement International: Ukraine’s Army of Drones crowdfunding campaign

Defence Procurement International: Ukraine’s Army of Drones crowdfunding campaign. “Ukraine is taking its drone war against Russian forces to unimaginable heights with a new crowdfunding campaign for an Army of Drones. The campaign aims to raise money to procure thousands of drones to monitor the more than 2,470 km long frontline in Ukraine and provide an effective response to Russian attacks.”

NPR: The Ice Bucket Challenge wasn’t just for social media. It helped fund a new ALS drug

NPR: The Ice Bucket Challenge wasn’t just for social media. It helped fund a new ALS drug. “The ALS Association said that $2.2 million of funds that were raised from the Ice Bucket Challenge went into funding the development and trial of the new drug that the Food and Drug Administration approved this week for treatment of ALS, which is also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.”

Wall Street Journal: Ukrainians Try Crowdsourcing to Catch Russian War Criminals

Wall Street Journal: Ukrainians Try Crowdsourcing to Catch Russian War Criminals. “The Justice Initiative Fund focuses its efforts only on war-crimes suspects officially ‘wanted’ by Ukrainian or foreign authorities. It states that it is ‘against vigilantism’ and doesn’t order assassinations of suspects. Instead, it seeks information it can verify and pass along to law enforcement to facilitate an arrest, as well as ‘previously unknown evidence of the crimes of the wanted person.’”

Adopt a Ukrainian grandparent: online portal launches to help Kharkiv’s most vulnerable (GlobalNews)

GlobalNews: Adopt a Ukrainian grandparent: online portal launches to help Kharkiv’s most vulnerable. “As well as organizing evacuations from the Luhansk, Donetsk and Kharkiv regions, Rescue Now has created an online database of elderly and vulnerable locals that features a brief bio, photo and fundraising goals for each of them for each month, depending on their needs. It’s almost like hundreds of GoFundMe pages accumulated in one place.”

The Next Web: Here’s how you can help build Ukraine’s drone army

The Next Web: Here’s how you can help build Ukraine’s drone army. “Earlier this month, Ukraine launched a campaign to assemble the world’s first ‘Army of Drones.’ It called on the international community to donate funds towards new drones or to ‘dronate’ their own recreational and commercial drones. That’s because Ukraine’s military doesn’t have an official drone unit, so drones supplied and funded globally will play a critical part in protecting the country against Russian occupation.”

Reuters: Cryptocurrency crash devalues Ukraine’s government crypto fundraise

Reuters: Cryptocurrency crash devalues Ukraine’s government crypto fundraise. “Cryptocurrencies have fallen sharply in recent weeks. Bitcoin has lost more than 20% of its price so far in May, following a 17% drop in April, highlighting the risks faced by holders of the highly volatile assets. All the funds raised in the ‘Aid for Ukraine’ fund were stored in cryptocurrency but the government was able to spend $45 million of it on equipment for Ukraine’s army before the crash, Bornyakov said in written responses to Reuters questions.”

The Block Crypto: Ukraine launches website for donating and buying NFTs

The Block Crypto: Ukraine launches website for donating and buying NFTs. “Ukraine’s government launched a website where people can donate and buy non-fungible tokens (NFTs), in an attempt to raise more funds for the war efforts. The new site lists several NFTs, including a mfer and a MoonCat with a Ukrainian flag, and links to their pages on OpenSea, where users can place bids to buy them.”

The big idea: can social media change the course of war? (The Guardian)

The Guardian: The big idea: can social media change the course of war?. “Social media users do not just watch these events unfold in real time; they react to and interact with them. Gestures such as incorporating a Ukrainian flag into one’s username may be merely symbolic, but when users lobby politicians online, donate money, or even offer up their own homes to refugees, their engagement with the war begins to have real-world consequences. Invading Russian forces seem to be aware of the potential of social media: they have targeted Ukrainian mobile communications networks, launching a missile attack on Kyivstar’s hub in Okhtyrka on 11 March, and reportedly going after communications infrastructure in Mariupol as well.”