YouTube Community Contributions Archive Now Available: A Look at the Stats (DataHorde)

DataHorde: YouTube Community Contributions Archive Now Available: A Look at the Stats. “The YouTube Community Contributions Archive is now available on the Internet Archive! You can download the entire collection, or simply search for and download files for a particular video. The collection is composed of 4096 ZIP archives which contain 406,394 folders and 1,361,998 files. Compressed, the collection is 3.83GB, and once decompressed, the collection is 9.46GB.”

ProBono Australia: The resource hub recharging Australian volunteering

ProBono Australia: The resource hub recharging Australian volunteering. “Volunteering Australia is launching an online resource hub to help reignite and strengthen Australian volunteering in a post-pandemic world. The hub brings together over 350 templates, videos, guides, and research to support volunteer managers to re-engage volunteers after COVID-19, manage the mental health and wellbeing of volunteers, and recruit younger volunteers.”

New York Times: Squealing Children and Noisy Neighbors? There’s a Map for That

New York Times: Squealing Children and Noisy Neighbors? There’s a Map for That. “The website, DQN Today, describes itself as a crowdsourced guide to help house hunters avoid neighborhoods inhabited by ‘stupid parents who let their children play on roads and parking lots.’ It is populated by maps visualizing the dorozoku, or ‘road tribe,’ a term that applies to people who block the way or wreak havoc in public.”

Atlas Obscura: California’s Elusive Urban Lizards Can’t Hide From Citizen Scientists

Atlas Obscura: California’s Elusive Urban Lizards Can’t Hide From Citizen Scientists. “AS A LIZARD-LOVING KID GROWING up in the San Francisco Bay area, Greg Pauly sometimes found himself running an accidental rehabilitation center for wayward reptiles out of his parents’ house. One neighbor wasn’t particularly sold on the squamates that lived around her yard, he recalls, but her cats, Crackers, Peepers, and Stinkers, kept intercepting them and delivering them to her. Pauly remembers that she paid him a dollar to take the unwelcome gifts off her hands, so he adopted the ‘three-legged, no tail’ lizards as pets.”

Journalism .co .uk: How to track down case studies for your next article

Journalism .co .uk: How to track down case studies for your next article. “Whether it is a woman who bought a divorce horse or a parent homeschooling five children, finding a case study can sometimes feel like more of an art than a science. Yet, the human experience is at the heart of journalism and it is a vital skill to be able to track down individuals with compelling stories. There are a number of methods that can be deployed to find the right person to illustrate a story, no matter how obscure the request may seem.”

Carteret County News-Times: NC Bird Atlas survey begins in March

Carteret County News-Times: NC Bird Atlas survey begins in March. “Audubon N.C. announced Jan. 15 the launch of the five-year survey. The statewide community science survey will harness the power of thousands of volunteer birdwatchers to map the distribution and abundance of birds from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Outer Banks. The observations will give researchers a comprehensive picture of bird populations across North Carolina and help wildlife officials, land managers and conservation organizations make important conservation decisions about the state’s avian population.”

NBC News: Twitter launches ‘Birdwatch,’ a forum to combat misinformation

NBC News: Twitter launches ‘Birdwatch,’ a forum to combat misinformation. “The new system allows users to discuss and provide context to tweets they believe are misleading or false. The project, titled Birdwatch, is a standalone section of Twitter that will at first only be available to a small set of users, largely on a first-come, first-served basis. Priority will not be provided to high-profile people or traditional fact-checkers, but users will have to use an account tied to a real phone number and email address.”

The Verge: Parkinson’s Meds Are Hard To Grab, So TikTok Users Crowdsourced A Solution

The Verge: Parkinson’s Meds Are Hard To Grab, So TikTok Users Crowdsourced A Solution. “Jimmy Choi’s TikTok page is filled with the typical videos of a high-level athlete: clips of himself doing one-armed pushups, climbing ropes, holding planks with weights on his back. If you look closely, though, you’ll notice that even before he begins his feats of strength and endurance, his hands are shaking. Choi has Parkinson’s disease, a central nervous system disorder that causes tremors, and he often posts about what it’s like to live with the disease…. One of his daily struggles comes in the shape of the pills he takes to manage his tremors. They’re very tiny, making them difficult to grasp with trembling hands.”

NiemanLab: After the Capitol riots, platforms, archivists, conspiracists, and investigators collide

NiemanLab: After the Capitol riots, platforms, archivists, conspiracists, and investigators collide. “Some of the entries in our 2021 predictions package proved gloomily prescient this week as a mob stormed the Capitol, incited by Trump’s baseless claims that he won the election. ‘A lot of America slipped into conspiracy thinking during this pandemic, and they got there from yoga Instagrams and NFL forums and private church choir Facebook groups that were systematically invaded by QAnon and anti-vax recruiters,’ NBC’s Ben Collins had written in his prediction. ‘It’s going to be a rude awakening in the next few months as we find out which of our friends got sucked into truly astonishing tales of New World Orders and Great Resets that helped them cope — and just so happen to be spectacularly wrong.’”

Smithsonian Magazine: Twenty-Four Ways to Turn Outdoor Passions Into Citizen Science

Smithsonian Magazine: Twenty-Four Ways to Turn Outdoor Passions Into Citizen Science. “The idea of crowdsourcing data from citizen scientists is far from new. But as more digital tools like drones and smartphones have entered the hands of ordinary people, projects looking to involve the outdoor-recreating public to collect data are getting more ambitious and diverse. Whether it’s collecting water samples, measuring snowpack or tracking wildlife, plenty of choices are available for people of every background and taste for adventure. As we consider our New Year’s resolutions, here is a roundup of suggestions for how to venture outdoors with a purpose.”

Wired: Open-source sleuths are already unmasking the Capitol Hill mob

Wired: Open-source sleuths are already unmasking the Capitol Hill mob. “While the mob was still in the Capitol building multiple groups, including Bellingcat, started to scrape everything being posted – a vast digital archive of the riots. Reddit users created a 12GB tranche of videos, Bellingcat’s spreadsheet has more than 100 examples of streams or videos and a database by search engine and data archive Intelligence X has more than 1,300 files totalling 83GB.”

Smithsonian Magazine: Your Cherished Family Recipes Could Be Featured in a Museum Exhibition

Smithsonian Magazine: Your Cherished Family Recipes Could Be Featured in a Museum Exhibition. “Family recipes, whether invented on the fly or handed down through generations, often become treasured heirlooms, offering a window into the private lives, flavors and histories of one’s ancestors. Now, the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) is giving the public a chance to share their relatives’ beloved recipes with a broader audience.”

BetaNews: Software industry turns to crowdsourced security during the pandemic

BetaNews: Software industry turns to crowdsourced security during the pandemic. “Among the many things that have changed in 2020 it’s proved to be a record year for crowdsourced cybersecurity adoption, according to Bugcrowd. Enterprises across all industries have been implementing crowdsourced cybersecurity programs to keep up with the evolving threat landscape. Bugcrowd has seen a 50 percent increase in submissions on its platform in the last 12 months, including a 65 percent increase in Priority One (P1) submissions, which refer to the most critical security vulnerabilities.”

Phys .org: ‘Strange rays’ crowdsourced on social media shed light on black hole illumination

Phys .org: ‘Strange rays’ crowdsourced on social media shed light on black hole illumination. “Unlike most scientific research, the team observing IC 5063’s strange rays assembled in a peculiar fashion: via crowd sourcing on social media. In December 2019, space image processing expert and citizen scientist Judy Schmidt noticed strange cones while processing an image of IC 5063, at first wondering if they were real, and if they were, whether they were galaxy-sized shadows, star streams, or something else.”