Google Blog: A look at one billion drawings from around the world

Google Blog: A look at one billion drawings from around the world. “Since November 2016, people all around the world have drawn one billion doodles in Quick, Draw!, a web game where a neural network tries to recognize your drawings…. Each drawing is unique. But when you step back and look at one billion of them, the differences fade away. Turns out, one billion drawings can remind us of how similar we are.”

Scroll.in: How social media showed its unique power of crowdsourcing during the Chennai floods

Scroll.in: How social media showed its unique power of crowdsourcing during the Chennai floods. “One ingenious resource that was circulated widely during the floods was a crowdsourced effort that mapped inundated roads in the city. Over 2,500 flooded roads were added to the city’s map via social media, which was put together by engineer and information designer, Arun Ganesh. The Chennai floods were a superb example of the power of collective effort. Users across social media channels came together to offer shelter, food, transport, and even a place for people to charge their phones. SOS messages asking ground teams to rescue stranded family members also went back and forth, and there were many who offered their homes and offices to those who were stranded.”

Center for Cooperative Media: We’re building a database of journalism collaborations. We need your help.

Center for Cooperative Media: We’re building a database of journalism collaborations. We need your help.. “Over the past year, we’ve been collecting information about dozens of collaborative reporting projects involving hundreds of newsrooms around the world. We used that information to identify six distinct models of collaborative journalism, which are based on how long newsroom and information organizations worked together, and how they integrated their work and workflows. Now, we’re creating a comprehensive database with the information we’ve collected about both those projects and others we don’t know about yet. In the coming weeks, we’re planning to gather as much information as we can about all kinds of collaborative journalism projects from around the world. “

Stanford Scope: Abuzz aims to combat mosquito-spread diseases using cellphones

Stanford Scope: Abuzz aims to combat mosquito-spread diseases using cellphones. “Itching to help combat the scourge of mosquito-borne diseases? I’ve got just the thing: Abuzz. The crowd-sourced project birthed in the lab of Stanford’s Manu Prakash, PhD, is aiming to map the prevalence of mosquitos worldwide using audio recorded by cellphones. Participation is simple: Spot a mosquito, grab your phone — even an old flip one will do — and point the microphone at it.”

Phys.org: Crowdsourced game aims to find solutions to aflatoxin

Phys.org: Crowdsourced game aims to find solutions to aflatoxin. “Mars, Inc., UC Davis and partners have launched a crowdsourcing initiative to solve the problem of aflatoxin contamination of crops. A series of aflatoxin puzzles will go online on Foldit, a platform that allows gamers to explore how amino acids are folded together to create proteins. The puzzles provide gamers with a starting enzyme that has the potential to degrade aflatoxin. Gamers from around the world then battle it out to redesign and improve the enzyme so that it can neutralize aflatoxin. Successful candidates from the computer game will be tested in the laboratory of Justin Siegel, assistant professor of chemistry, biochemistry and molecular medicine at UC Davis.”

Teen Vogue: How Social Media Affects Crime Investigations

Teen Vogue (yes, really): How Social Media Affects Crime Investigations. “On September 12, 19-year-old Kenneka Jenkins was found dead in a walk-in hotel freezer in Rosemont, Illinois, where she had been at a party. Nearly one month after the fact, the Cook County medical examiner ruled her death an accident, despite thousands of social media users insisting otherwise. News of Kenneka’s death went viral almost immediately after becoming public, and amateur sleuths quickly got to work trying to solve the mystery of what happened. Social media was flooded not only with sadness and well-wishes, but also with analyses of social media videos, conspiracy theories, and personal accusations, which have continued for weeks.”

University of Iowa: Fanzines of science fiction, fantasy and horror available to read and transcribe

University of Iowa: Fanzines of science fiction, fantasy and horror available to read and transcribe. “What would you do with thousands of fragile leaflets, known as fanzines, that chronicle the history of science fiction? Such fanzines hold rich information too valuable to sit untouched, yet the materials cannot be handled without risking destruction. At the University of Iowa Libraries, a digitization project is underway to save a large, notable zine collection.”