Penn Today: Reclaiming a Fragmented History

Penn Today: Reclaiming a fragmented history . “Harnessing the power of human cooperation, digital humanities scholars at Penn Libraries are orchestrating an epic effort to sort and transcribe handwriting on thousands of documents discarded hundreds of years ago. Through an innovative new website built by the Penn team in collaboration with Zooniverse, an online platform for crowdsourced research, citizen scholars can help analyze the digitized texts, which are written in five Hebrew and three Arabic scripts, some of them exceedingly rare.”

NARA: Citizen Archivists Help Make Access Happen, One Scanned Record at a Time

NARA: Citizen Archivists Help Make Access Happen, One Scanned Record at a Time. “Citizen Archivists recently helped the National Archives and Records Administration reach a new milestone, collectively scanning their 300,000th page for inclusion in the National Archives Catalog. It’s all part of an agency-wide effort to make more records publicly accessible online.”

Public Radio East: Shark Spotting Citizen-Science Program Launches

Public Radio East: Shark Spotting Citizen-Science Program Launches. “The Spot A Shark USA program starts June 1. People who encounter sand tiger sharks are asked to upload their photos to the online database. Marine scientists will be able to use the pictures to identify individual sharks and track their movements, said South-East Zoo Alliance for Reproduction and Conservation Dr. Avery Paxton. “

New York Public Library: Unlocking the Record of American Creativity—with Your Help

The New York Public Library apparently posted this on March 30 and good heavens, how did I miss it? Unlocking the Record of American Creativity—with Your Help. “The New York Public Library (NYPL) is embarking on a pilot project to extract the data from a publication known as the Catalog of Copyright Entries, published annually by the United States Copyright Office. The volumes have already been digitized and are freely available through the Internet Archive; our project aims to extract and parse the data contained in the records in order to create a searchable database that will aid copyright research.”

Alabama Centennial Blog: We Need YOU to Help Transcribe World War I Service Records!

Alabama Centennial Blog: We Need YOU to Help Transcribe World War I Service Records! . “Earlier this month, as part of its commemoration of the World War I Centennial, the Archives launched the Alabama History DIY: World War I Service Records initiative. Archives staff, volunteers, and student workers spent eighteen months digitizing more than 100,000 index cards with information about the men and women who served in the war. Details ranging from biographical (age, residence, race) to military (enlistment date, branch of service, engagements) make the records a boon to both genealogists and historians. Users of the Archives’ World War I Gold Star Database will find this an excellent supplement, as it also includes survivors of the war. Now that the cards have been scanned, we are seeking volunteers to help us transcribe the information and create a new, searchable resource for our patrons. ”

Dallas News: Holocaust Museum project debunks myth that Americans weren’t aware of the plight of Jews in Nazi Germany

Dallas News: Holocaust Museum project debunks myth that Americans weren’t aware of the plight of Jews in Nazi Germany. “Two years ago, in preparation for the exhibition, the museum launched a crowd-sourcing project, ‘History Unfolded.’ Museum staff asked students, teachers, librarians and history buffs across the country to research their local newspapers and determine what kind of information their communities could have read or heard about Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. With the help of hundreds of students and dedicated volunteers, the museum built an extensive online archive of American newspaper coverage of key Holocaust events, including more than 12,000 articles from every U.S. state. Each submission is important historical evidence.”

Irish Times: Ireland’s darkest, oddest and weirdest secrets uncovered

This is from last month but I missed it and I must include it here because it’s AMAZING. From the Irish Times: Ireland’s darkest, oddest and weirdest secrets uncovered. “A worldwide crowdsourcing movement is currently unearthing Ireland’s deepest fairy secrets and darkest myths. A voluntary collective online is working its way through transcribing 700,000 pages of folklore that were collected throughout Ireland between 1937 and 1939. This mass of previously inaccessible material was gathered by more than 100,000 children who were sent to seek out the oldest person in their community just before second World War to root out the darkest, oddest and weirdest traditional beliefs, secrets and customs, which were then logged into 1,128 volumes, titled the Schools’ Manuscripts Collection.”