The Next Web: Your social media use is helping scientists monitor the world’s ecosystems

The Next Web: Your social media use is helping scientists monitor the world’s ecosystems. “Smartphones and mobile internet connections have made it much easier for citizens to help gather scientific information. Examples of environmental monitoring apps include WilddogScan, Marine Debris Tracker, OakMapper and Journey North, which monitors the movements of Monarch butterflies. Meanwhile, social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Flickr host vast amounts of information. While not posted explicitly for environmental monitoring, social media posts from a place like the Great Barrier Reef can contain useful information about the health (or otherwise) of the environment there.”

Mic: These are the dozens of movements underway to remove Confederate monuments. Help us identify more.

Mic: These are the dozens of movements underway to remove Confederate monuments. Help us identify more.. “So far, Mic has identified 25 movements in 2017 that have removed or are pushing to remove specific Confederate monuments. Many of these efforts began or were renewed in the days since the violence in Charlottesville. That includes online petitions, in-person protests, moves by city officials and other efforts to remove memorials. At least eight Confederate monuments have been removed from public land in 2017 alone (a ninth was relocated from public land in one Kentucky city to another).”

Phys.org: AI, crowdsourcing combine to close ‘analogy gap’

Phys.org: AI, crowdsourcing combine to close ‘analogy gap’. “Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem devised a method enabling computers to mine databases of patents, inventions and research papers, identifying ideas that can be repurposed to solve new problems or create new products. Specifically, they developed a way for computers to find analogies—comparisons between sometimes disparate methods and problems that highlight underlying similarities.”

Berkeley: Megamovie app makes photographing total eclipse a snap

Berkeley: Megamovie app makes photographing total eclipse a snap. “When downloaded and installed, the app walks users through a simple process to point your smart phone at the sun using an appropriate filter to protect the camera’s sensors. Once protected and pointed properly, the camera determines where you are and automatically starts taking photos of the sun 15 seconds before totality at your location, snaps periodic shots throughout the total eclipse – which will last a maximum of 2 minutes, 40 seconds, depending on where you are – and takes a series of photos during the 15 seconds after the total eclipse has ended to capture the ‘diamond ring’ effect.”

Global News: U.K. researchers use Google satellite images to identify signs of slavery in India

Global News: U.K. researchers use Google satellite images to identify signs of slavery in India. “When Jess Wardlaw began working with the Slavery from Space project, she was taken aback by just how prevalent slavery is in the modern world. Slavery from Space is a project by the University of Nottingham’s Rights Lab that uses Google satellite images to identify signs of slavery in India, and pass that information onto local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) working on the ground and government officials. The Rights Lab is a wider initiative by the university to put an end to slavery around the world.”

GovTech: Cities Drowning in Data Turn to ‘Citizen Scientists’

GovTech: Cities Drowning in Data Turn to ‘Citizen Scientists’. “In the public sector, citizen data scientists range from volunteers to government workers. Dr. Matt Willis, a public health officer for Marin County, Calif., uses citizen data scientists to tackle a range of problems, from finding better ways to manage the county’s emergency services to stemming the exploding opioid epidemic. He’s excited by the potential and says that it’s increasingly important for governments to ‘provide tools that allow people who are not analysts to conduct analytical research.'”

Engadget: NASA wants you to record solar eclipse data with an app

Engadget: NASA wants you to record solar eclipse data with an app. “Chances are that, by now, you’ve heard about the full solar eclipse that will cross the continental United States on August 21, 2017. And now, NASA is enlisting all of us as citizen scientists: The organization wants your help to record data during the eclipse.”