Global News: Researchers examine the use of Twitter in the Christopher Garnier trial

Global News: Researchers examine the use of Twitter in the Christopher Garnier trial. “Were you one of the thousands of people who followed every moment of Christopher Garnier’s second-degree murder trial on Twitter? If so, researchers are looking for your feedback.”

Wired: The Quest To Recreate The Olympics With Mechanical Turk

Wired: The Quest To Recreate The Olympics With Mechanical Turk. “SHAMIK GHOSH HAD been picking up tasks on Amazon Mechanical Turk for several months when he logged on in winter 2010 and saw a perplexing request: Someone wanted him to act out a series of Winter Olympic sports—snowboarding, ice hockey, figure skating, etc.—and they were offering to pay him $3.50 for every video that he uploaded to YouTube. Given that conceptualizing, filming, and uploading a video would take 10 minutes at most, that came out to an hourly wage of about $21—an immense sum for the microtask platform, where the average wage as of 2017 was $2/hour. And unlike most tasks on Mechanical Turk, this one actually seemed … fun.”

Mumbai: American Photographer Launches Crowd-Sourced Aarey Forest Image Bank (Mid Day)

Mid Day: Mumbai: American Photographer Launches Crowd-Sourced Aarey Forest Image Bank. “[Craig] Boehman, an independent photographer, is the man behind Aarey Forest Image Bank. The database, which can be found on Instagram, Facebook and mainly Flickr, is meant as a crowd-sourced pool of photographs that offers vignettes of life in Aarey Milk Colony, which has become the heavily contested site between the Mumbai Metro Rail Corporation Limited (MMRC) and, those on the other side of the debate, such as environmentalists and the adivasis.” “Adivasis” is a term for indigenous people in India.

Penn State: Can social media data be used to predict threats or identify fake news?

Penn State: Can social media data be used to predict threats or identify fake news?. “Can publicly available data from large-scale social media networks be used to help predict catastrophic events within the country’s infrastructure, such as threats to national security, the energy system or even the economy?”

Times of India: Now, an app to record, bring down roadkill

Times of India: Now, an app to record, bring down roadkill. “A large number of animals are killed each year along roads and railway lines crisscrossing reserve forests in the country, but the exact number of lives lost is not recorded. Wildlife Conservation Trust (WCT), an NGO working for tiger conservation, recently launched a citizen science initiative…. The idea is to collect data on mortality of wild animals on roads, irrigation canals or railway lines so that targeted mitigation measures can be undertaken in these areas, and wildlife conservation and planned development can go hand-in-hand.”

Linux Journal: Introducing the CAPS0ff Project

Linux Journal: Introducing the CAPS0ff Project. “It’s no secret that I love classic video games. Fortunately, thanks to emulation, many of the classic arcade games still can be enjoyed and forever will be available via digital copies of the ROM chips. Sadly, some older systems have protection, making them impossible to dump into ROMs properly. If the chips can’t be dumped, how will you ever get a digital copy of the ROM data? Well, the folks over at the CAPS0ff blog actually are disassembling the original chips and painstakingly transcribing the contents one bit at a time. They’re literally looking at the chips and determining the 1s and 0s burned onto them. Yes, there are a lot of chips. Yes, it takes a long time to copy the bits one by one. And yes, you can help. When a chip is stripped down literally to its bits (using various acid baths and so forth), it is scanned at high resolution. Then, pieces of the chips are put into a database, and people like you and me can transcribe the photos into 1s and 0s for the project!”

Newark Advertiser (UK): More help needed to preserve our pictures from the past

Newark Advertiser (UK): More help needed to preserve our pictures from the past. “Thousands of images from the Advertiser’s photographic archive are now online thanks to a long-term project to safeguard them for future generations. They are working their way through thousands of old photographic negatives, some dating back to the 1940s. Because of their age, some of the negatives are becoming damaged or corroded so it is vital that they are digitalised.”