Data Horde: Help Archive YouTube’s Community Contributions!

Data Horde: Help Archive YouTube’s Community Contributions!. “YouTube is removing their community contributions feature on September 28. In case you haven’t already heard, that’s the feature which allows viewers to add captions/subtitles, translated titles and video descriptions on videos. And YouTube seems to be pretty insistent on removing the feature, despite massive backlash. Now although YouTube have given their word to keep published community captions (and other contributions) online, there’s a small detail many people have overlooked. Last year, YouTube restricted the feature to only allow uploaders to publish contributions. As such, there are many many unpublished captions, title/description translations stuck in review.”

Engadget: Google wants you to train its AI by lip syncing ‘Dance Monkey’ by Tones and I

Engadget: Google wants you to train its AI by lip syncing ‘Dance Monkey’ by Tones and I. “Google is asking users to help teach its AI how to speak. A new ‘Experiments with Google’ called LipSync asks users to lip sync a small part of ‘Dance Monkey’ by Tones and I, Android Police reports. LipSync, which is built by YouTube for Chrome on desktop, will score your performance. It will then feed the video to Google’s AI — it doesn’t record any audio.”

Archives Jackpot: Citizen Archivist Contributions Top One Million (NARA)

National Archives: Archives Jackpot: Citizen Archivist Contributions Top One Million. “The Citizen Archivists who tag, transcribe, and comment in the National Archives Catalog recently achieved a milestone: their contributions have now enhanced more than one million pages of records. The community-sourced project witnessed a surge in contributions this fiscal year, then got an additional boost from the public and from National Archives staff, when the COVID-19 pandemic prompted increased telework for the agency and across the United States, beginning in March.”

The Next Web: Mozilla needs your help to expose YouTube’s recommendation algorithm

The Next Web: Mozilla needs your help to expose YouTube’s recommendation algorithm. “After installing the RegretsReporter and playing a YouTube video, you can click the frowning face icon in your browser to report the video, the recommendations that led you to it, and any extra details on ‘your regret.’ Mozilla researchers will then search for patterns that led to the recommendations.”

Lonely Planet: This website aims to find the top places for wildlife spotting in Africa

Lonely Planet: This website aims to find the top places for wildlife spotting in Africa. “Whether you want to tick the Big Five off your African safari bucket list or seek out specific species, a new website from Expert Africa is making it easier than ever to decide which country and even which lodges offer the best chances for wildlife sightings. The data, sourced from more than 700 traveler surveys compiled by the tour operator over two years, has morphed into a huge ‘citizen science’ project and represents nearly 30,000 observations of 26 animal species.”

Cosmos Magazine: Renewed interest in weathered records

Cosmos Magazine: Renewed interest in weathered records. “Each week Cosmos takes a look at projects and news about citizen science in Australia. This week, we report on a new initiative launched by Climate History Australia at the Australian National University (ANU). Scientists at ANU have an ambition to create Australia’s longest daily weather record, beginning in 1838, and they’d like help from citizen scientists.”

ABC News (Australia): Australian Museum crowdsourcing website DigiVol sees spike in volunteers during COVID-19

ABC News (Australia): Australian Museum crowdsourcing website DigiVol sees spike in volunteers during COVID-19 . “DigiVol was developed by the museum in collaboration with the Atlas Of Living Australia to help it and other institutions worldwide digitise and analyse their collections…. Since the website was launched in 2011, 4.4 million items from the museum and other institutions have been analysed by volunteers. Two million of those have been submitted since March.”

The Guardian: Could you help with the archive’s shorthand transcription project?

The Guardian: Could you help with the archive’s shorthand transcription project?. “We have digitised a set of notebooks from our Clyde Sanger archive. Sanger worked as a Guardian journalist in the mid-20th century, starting as the paper’s first Africa correspondent and going on to serve as UN correspondent and Canada correspondent. His notes are written in a mixture of longhand and Pitman’s New Era shorthand, and we’re looking for volunteers able to read the shorthand and willing to try transcribing it from the digital scans.”

University of California: With a nod to UC Berkeley, Google crowdsources earthquake data

University of California: With a nod to UC Berkeley, Google crowdsources earthquake data. “A UC Berkeley idea to crowdsource every cellphone on the planet to create a global seismic network has been adapted by Google and incorporated into the Android operating system, kicking off an effort to build the world’s largest network of earthquake detectors.”

Canadian Manufacturing: The next invasion of insect pests will be discovered via social media

Canadian Manufacturing: The next invasion of insect pests will be discovered via social media. “People of all ages are taking to social media to connect with other naturalists. From Whatsthisbug on Reddit (which boasts 245,000 members), to the thousands of active entomologists on Twitter, to the hundreds of groups dedicated to insect identification on Facebook such as Entomology (146,000 members) and Insect Identification (62,000 members), social media are enabling biodiversity conversations. New scientifically unnamed species — from fungi to flowers to insects — are now regularly found via Twitter, Facebook and Flickr.”

Taipei Times: Taiwan’s wildlife database the second-largest in Asia

Taipei Times: Taiwan’s wildlife database the second-largest in Asia . “A database on biodiversity in Taiwan has compiled records of almost 10 million wildlife sightings, making it the second-largest wildlife index in Asia, with the vast majority of data coming from volunteers, the Council of Agriculture’s Endemic Species Research Institute said. The Taiwan Biodiversity Network, which was launched in 2007, has recorded 9.87 million animal and plant sightings, Ko Chih-jen (柯智仁), an assistant researcher at the institute, said… adding that India maintains Asia’s largest database with up to 19 million recorded sightings.”

Atlas Obscura: A Database of 5,000 Historical Cookbooks Is Now Online, and You Can Help Improve It

Atlas Obscura: A Database of 5,000 Historical Cookbooks Is Now Online, and You Can Help Improve It. “In July 2020, [Barbara Ketcham] Wheaton and a team of scholars, including two of her children, Joe Wheaton and Catherine Wheaton Saines, launched The Sifter. Part Wikipedia-style crowd-sourced database and part meticulous bibliography, The Sifter is a catalogue of more than a thousand years of European and U.S. cookbooks, from the medieval Latin De Re Culinaria, published in 800, to The Romance of Candy, a 1938 treatise on British sweets.”

KTSP: New website tracks broadband access and internet speed across Minnesota

KTSP: New website tracks broadband access and internet speed across Minnesota. “The Minnesota Rural Broadband Coalition is asking people to take the speed test on their website. Participants give their address or a nearby location data. The website then measures the download and upload speeds of the internet connection. The results are then recorded and displayed on a map. Green dots indicate a fast connection; red dots equal a slow connection.”

Phys .org: Citizen scientists help geologists to identify earthquakes and tectonic tremors

Phys .org: Citizen scientists help geologists to identify earthquakes and tectonic tremors. “Tens of thousands of seismic stations around the world continuously record local seismic activity, with an output that is far beyond what scientists can process. Here, researchers from Northwestern University have called over 2,000 citizen scientists to the rescue for the crowd-based analysis of seismic recordings, rendered into audiovisual format, through the program Earthquake Detective on the Open-Science platform Zooniverse. They show that citizens are at least as accurate as machine learning, and can even identify tectonic tremors, which previously was only possible for trained professionals.”

CNET: Australia has invented Shazam for spiders

CNET: Australia has invented Shazam for spiders. “Critterpedia is a collaboration between creators Nic and Murray Scare and Australia’s National Science Agency, CSIRO. It’s a machine learning engine designed to automatically identify different species of spiders and snakes. An AI-powered algorithm like Critterpedia requires hundreds of thousands of images to become accurate in its assessments, so CSIRO and Data 61 are hoping to get as many people as possible to download Critterpedia and upload pictures of spiders and snakes they might see in the wild.”