Tom Hanks, The NBA, And COVID’s Day Of Reckoning In The US: An Oral History (BuzzFeed News)

BuzzFeed News: Tom Hanks, The NBA, And COVID’s Day Of Reckoning In The US: An Oral History. “So many forces of history years in the making converged on March 11 and were all subsumed by something few thought possible just weeks earlier. Suddenly there was no escape. The sentencing of Harvey Weinstein and the last moments of Bernie Sanders’ failing campaign against Joe Biden — huge milestones for the #MeToo movement and American politics — were abruptly overtaken. Even the experts at the World Health Organization would agree March 11 was a turning point — that was the date they officially declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic. BuzzFeed News reporters interviewed 65 people in four countries to tell the story of that fateful day.”

LA Weekly: The Truth In Photography Project Is Asking Big Questions

LA Weekly: The Truth In Photography Project Is Asking Big Questions. “An interactive project committed to presenting multiple points of view and encouraging a wider discourse, the Truth In Photography project features diverse and eclectic contributions of curators, photographers, critics, and historians, as well as vernacular photography, photojournalism, and fine art…. Truth in Photography will be updated quarterly, beginning with the new Winter 2021 which comes in three themed sections.”

Collecting These Times: American Jewish Experiences of the Pandemic (Spotted via Google Alerts)

Spotted via my Google Alerts: Collecting These Times: American Jewish Experiences of the Pandemic. From the front page: “COVID-19 has altered the way people engaged with their communities and religious practices. Collecting These Times connects American Jews to Jewish institutions and other collecting projects which can gather and preserve their experiences of the pandemic. Individuals can find relevant collecting projects through the portal and easily contribute materials such as images, videos, audio recordings, documents, and oral histories to collecting institutions in different parts of the U.S.”

Make Tech Easier: Five Websites for Keeping Tabs on the COVID-19 Pandemic

Make Tech Easier: Five Websites for Keeping Tabs on the COVID-19 Pandemic. “COVID-19 has now dragged into its second year. It’s more important now than ever to take in accurate information that is verified and without bias. The current information environment has now transitioned from discovering resources about testing to information about vaccinations and variants. We have found five of the best websites for consuming the latest in pandemic news, testing information, tracking the spread of the virus, and more. As information updates at a rapid rate, it is more important now than ever to ensure that you are up to date on the latest.”

UC Riverside: Pew Research Center Research Associate to Discuss How Global Legislators Use Twitter

UC Riverside: Pew Research Center Research Associate to Discuss How Global Legislators Use Twitter. “On Thursday, March 4, the University of California, Riverside (UCR) School of Public Policy will host a talk by Kat Devlin, a Research Associate of the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project, about the Center’s recent work using computational social science and social media to evaluate what lawmakers around the world think about current international affairs.”

Getty: Can Art and Science Solve the Most Complex Challenges of the 21st Century?

Getty: Can Art and Science Solve the Most Complex Challenges of the 21st Century?. “Forty-five cultural, educational, and scientific institutions throughout Southern California received over $5 million in exhibition research grants by the Getty Foundation to prepare for the next edition of the region-wide arts initiative Pacific Standard Time, scheduled to open in 2024. The landmark series will return with dozens of exhibitions and programs focused on the intertwined histories of art and science, past and present. Together, they address some of the most complex challenges of the 21st century—from climate change and environmental racism to the current pandemic and artificial intelligence—and the creative solutions these problems demand.”

University of Virginia: UVA Helps Educators Wrestle With How To Appropriately Teach Current Events

University of Virginia: UVA Helps Educators Wrestle With How To Appropriately Teach Current Events. “In the coming months and years, educators will grapple with how to most appropriately and effectively teach about recent events that illuminate the deep, troubling divisions in America and the history from which they emerged…. To address this need to support K-12 teachers throughout the U.S., a team of faculty and students from the University of Virginia School of Education and Human Development, alongside practicing educators, have collaborated to launch a new online resource hub. Educating for Democracy offers a range of teaching tools, including developmentally appropriate lessons that interrogate issues of race, justice and human welfare in the U.S. by connecting the full story of the past with current events.”

MIT Technology Review: The scramble to archive Capitol insurrection footage before it disappears

MIT Technology Review: The scramble to archive Capitol insurrection footage before it disappears. “As a violent mob incited by President Donald Trump stormed the US Capitol on January 6, halting the procedure in Congress to formally certify Joe Biden as president-elect, a Redditor with the username Adam Lynch began a thread on the subreddit r/DataHoarder—a forum dedicated to saving data that might be erased or deleted…. The thread included a link to upload files to Mega, a New Zealand–based cloud storage service. Within minutes, the thread was so inundated with Twitter links, Snapchat uploads, and other videos that Mega briefly shut the link down.”

From streets to museums: Artists archive 2020 summer of protest (Christian Science Monitor)

Christian Science Monitor: From streets to museums: Artists archive 2020 summer of protest. “As Black Lives Matter protests wane and protest murals fade, citizens, academics, and arts groups seeking to preserve the past for future generations are archiving art from this summer’s historic George Floyd protests in a myriad of physical and digital ways.”

EurekAlert: Survey finds Americans social media habits changing as national tensions rise

EurekAlert: Survey finds Americans social media habits changing as national tensions rise. “As national tensions rise, a new national survey of 2,000 people commissioned by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds more Americans are adjusting how they use social media platforms. Many participants cited stress from the global COVID-19 pandemic, along with the movement to end racial inequality and other divisive political issues in our country as reasons for taking a social media break.”

University of Washington: UW Libraries publishes new online research guides on racial justice, African American experience in Pacific Northwest

University of Washington: UW Libraries publishes new online research guides on racial justice, African American experience in Pacific Northwest. “The African American Research & Archival Collections in the Pacific Northwest Collections guide was compiled and released in June. This guide highlights archival and printed materials, photographs and moving image collections available in UW Special Collections that relate to Black communities, political groups and civil rights movements in the Pacific Northwest. UW Libraries also has created a tab titled ‘Racial Justice Resources: Keeping Current.’ The guide is a starting point for students and faculty ‘seeking to better understand issues related to racial justice and racism in America.’” Yes, some of the content is university access only, but the Keeping Current page is stuffed with resources. STUFFED.

NBC 2: Museums and historians are navigating how to write the history of Covid-19 when the end isn’t in sight

NBC 2: Museums and historians are navigating how to write the history of Covid-19 when the end isn’t in sight. “When the Covid-19 pandemic broke out in the United States, the California Historical Society received call after call asking for its archive on the 1918 flu. Researchers and journalists were looking for clues into how Americans coped in the thick of a pandemic — and what we could learn in 2020 from 1918. But the documents from the early 20th century were few and there was just one photograph in the archive to depict the entire experience. Historians, libraries and museums now are making sure, in that way, history does not repeat itself with the coronavirus pandemic.”

Insight News: U of M Press releases “Reading for Racial Justice” digital collection for free Summer reading

Insight News: U of M Press releases “Reading for Racial Justice” digital collection for free Summer reading. “On May 25, Minneapolis and the state of Minnesota became the center of attention with the death of George Floyd. It was also an open window to a curious world that wanted to learn more about African American history, race relations, and social justice. The University of Minnesota Press has released a digital collection, ‘Reading for Racial Justice,’ for free summer reading. The collection has been curated to express the intersectionality of race, food, and environmental justice.”