Motherboard: Researcher Deepfakes His Voice, Uses AI to Demand Refund From Wells Fargo

Motherboard: Researcher Deepfakes His Voice, Uses AI to Demand Refund From Wells Fargo. “Do Not Pay is an organization that has previously automated all manner of things from fighting parking tickets to easily cancel unwanted subscriptions. In a video uploaded to Twitter on Wednesday, Do Not Pay founder Joshua Browder showed the tool calling Wells Fargo customer support, and using an AI-generated version of his own voice to overturn wire fees.”

Washington Post: The long, lonely wait to recover a hacked Facebook account

Washington Post: The long, lonely wait to recover a hacked Facebook account. “Help Desk, the personal technology section at The Washington Post, has received hundreds of emails from people locked out of their Facebook accounts with no idea how to get back in. Many lose their accounts to hackers, who take over Facebook pages to resell them or to game search-engine rankings. In some cases, losing the account is an inconvenience. But in many others, it is a threat to the finances, relationships or well-being of the user. [Lucretia] Groce, for instance, estimates she has lost $18,000 in income after waiting for months for her account to be unlocked.”

CNET: Americans’ Satisfaction With Internet Service Providers Falls, Study Shows

CNET: Americans’ Satisfaction With Internet Service Providers Falls, Study Shows. “When the American Customer Satisfaction Index in June announced its numbers for the broadband industry, we noted that internet service providers landed at the very bottom of all industries surveyed. Well, the news isn’t much better with the release last week of a study from J.D. Power.”

Washington Post: Europe’s largest airline is a troll on social media — and it’s working for them

Washington Post: Europe’s largest airline is a troll on social media — and it’s working for them . “Last month, when a Ryanair passenger tweeted a complaint about the lack of a window by her exit row seat, she might have expected Europe’s largest airline to offer an apology using language straight out of a customer service manual. But this wasn’t British Airways or Lufthansa. It was a no-frills carrier that might best be described to Americans as the Spirit Airlines of Europe — if Spirit had the most savage Twitter presence of any brand in the sky.”

Review Geek: Google Took My Money and Canceled My Nest Service

Review Geek: Google Took My Money and Canceled My Nest Service. “I should preface all of this with some crucial details. I freely admit I’m partially to blame for the start of the mess. And you should be aware that I used the 1st generation version of Nest Aware, which isn’t offered anymore. But that doesn’t absolve Google of the fact that it has taken my money for my Nest Aware subscription and refuses to provide me that service. Nor does the terrible customer service I received help the situation either.”

University of Exeter: Pandemic left hospitality workers more vulnerable to conflict from customers and less able to challenge managers over safety due to financial insecurity, study shows

University of Exeter: Pandemic left hospitality workers more vulnerable to conflict from customers and less able to challenge managers over safety due to financial insecurity, study shows. “Hospitality workers felt less able to challenge and negotiate bad practice or unsafe working conditions during the coronavirus pandemic, a new study shows. Workers feeling less financially secure, particularly those on zero-hour contracts, said they couldn’t raise concerns about health and safety with their bosses.”

New York Times: A Nation on Hold Wants to Speak With a Manager

New York Times: A Nation on Hold Wants to Speak With a Manager. “The meanness of the public has forced many public-facing industries to rethink what used to be an article of faith: that the customer is always right. If employees are now having to take on many unexpected roles — therapist, cop, conflict-resolution negotiator — then workplace managers are acting as security guards and bouncers to protect their employees.”

Newswise: Are you talking to a chatbot? Would you like to?

Newswise: Are you talking to a chatbot? Would you like to?. “As artificial intelligence and natural language processing advance, we often don’t know if we are talking to a person or an AI-powered chatbot, says Tom Kelleher, Ph.D., an advertising professor in the University of Florida’s College of Journalism and Communications. What matters more than who (or what) is on the other side of the chat, Kelleher has found, is the perceived humanness of the interaction.”

Axios: Unruly customers threaten economic recovery

Axios: Unruly customers threaten economic recovery. “The pace of the economic recovery hinges in part on workers returning to jobs that involve dealing with an unpredictable public. But many of those workers say increasingly combative customers — angry about everything from long wait times to mask mandates — have prompted them to quit.”

ZDNet: He thought iPhone users were stupid. Then his Google Pixel stopped working

ZDNet: He thought iPhone users were stupid. Then his Google Pixel stopped working. “It’s long been an issue with Google that many of its phones are excellent, but much of what surrounds them — the marketing and the customer service — are slightly less than excellent, drifting toward the really not very good. You’d think the company would fully commit, one way or the other. Yet it’s constantly seemed to resist, preferring to hang in slow, suspended animation.”

The Next Web: 2020 will mark the death of the chatbot as we know it

The Next Web: 2020 will mark the death of the chatbot as we know it. “According to recent research, only 9 percent of customers felt that they would be best served by a chatbot for serious enquiries, whereas the figures for a voice call were in excess of 80 percent. But with 80 percent of contact centers wanting to adopt chatbot technology by 2020, what is does this industry know that we don’t? Well, they are seeing the bright and not-so-distant future of this technology, and it doesn’t look like a thing like your average chatbot.”

India Today: Angry Pixel user puts up anti-Google posters in town, slams company’s aftersales service

India Today: Angry Pixel user puts up anti-Google posters in town, slams company’s aftersales service. “With so many smartphones in a market the size of India, manufacturers struggle to keep up with a uniform after sales service for various models. Customers, therefore, often end up dissatisfied and expressing their displeasure against that particular brand on social media channels. However, some people, like Manu Aggarwal from Haryana for instance, think that there’s a better way to publicise their problem with a particular brand, i.e. through banners and billboards. Therefore, when Google failed to offer him an unsatisfactory service, he took to the real world to express his emotions for Google.”

The Next Web: Your bank is probably using phishing tactics on you

Warning: this has an f-bomb in it. But it’s good information and a really good point. From The Next Web: Your bank is probably using phishing tactics on you. “Perhaps this doesn’t raise red flags for you. Perhaps this seems completely normal. Here I have a person from a totally unknown number calling me asking for my most secret information. This is a phishing scam, right? No, this is the FRAUD DEPARTMENT of my bank calling me. They’re just behaving exactly like a phishing scammer.”