Lifehacker: The Best Free Online Tools to Map Your Own Bike Routes

Lifehacker: The Best Free Online Tools to Map Your Own Bike Routes. “Whether you’re in an unfamiliar place or broadening your horizons in your hometown, there are plenty of tools online to customize different walk, run, and bike routes wherever you are. The online tools we’ll highlight here are not all created equal, so let’s take a look at the best free options depending on what you’re looking for in a map.”

VeloNews: Introducing the VeloNews Archive – 50 years of our magazines online

VeloNews: Introducing the VeloNews Archive – 50 years of our magazines online. “VeloNews photo director Brad Kaminski worked for more than a year on this project, which we are happy to share with you today on the eve of the 50th anniversary of VeloNews. Our first issue was published March 13, 1972. The magazine began as Northeast Bicycle News, then later became Cyclenews, Velo-news, and finally VeloNews.” Requires an access membership, but it’s not onerous.

Cycling Industry News: New tool lists nearly 300 EU subsidy and tax incentives for bike firms

Cycling Industry News: New tool lists nearly 300 EU subsidy and tax incentives for bike firms. “A new tool developed by the European Cyclists’ Federation (ECF) and the City Changer Cargo Bike project (CCCB) has curated a list of nearly 300 tax and subsidy benefits available in Europe. The national, regional and local incentives have been compiled in a first of its kind directory in the hope of giving bike firms and cycling groups a clear view on perks that may help them both in business and to subsequently grow cycling numbers in Europe.”

The Conversation: Virtual Tour de France shows how esports has come of age during lockdown

The Conversation: Virtual Tour de France shows how esports has come of age during lockdown. “Elite sports events are still largely closed to the world – but July 2020 has still been an unprecedented month for the global sporting calendar thanks to the world’s first Virtual Tour de France, which – despite the name – was based nowhere in particular, as riders took part from their homes in all parts of the world. It’s historic, not just because the event brought together the world of esports cycling and the iconic and gruelling race – this was also the first time that women competed in a multistage Tour.”

CNET: Google Map revamps its bike routes for easy riding

CNET: Google Map revamps its bike routes for easy riding. “To help people get around this summer in an eco-friendly — and healthy — way, Google Maps has added new features to its offerings for cyclists. Users can now access the most up-to-date bike routes generated by machine learning algorithms, as well as data from government authorities and community contributions.”

New York Times: Sports in a Pandemic Don’t All Stink

New York Times: Sports in a Pandemic Don’t All Stink. “The Tour de France, like many major sporting events, is on hold because of the pandemic. But last weekend, I watched cartoon likenesses of professional cyclists fighting to win a virtual version. Connected to the Zwift virtual world for running and cycling were the real-life athletes riding stationary bicycles in their dining rooms, garages or backyards. When they had to ride up a steep virtual French mountain, I watched a split-screen video feed of their real-life faces straining and their heart rates soaring. It was genuine fun.”

COVID-19 has created more cyclists: How cities can keep them on their bikes (The Conversation)

The Conversation: COVID-19 has created more cyclists: How cities can keep them on their bikes. “Personal vehicles do allow for adequate distancing, but many cities cannot support the shift of public transit riders to cars. There is also a substantial cost-barrier associated with car ownership: parking, insurance, gas. As a result, more people in North America are taking to cycling — and bike shops across the United States and Canada are seeing record sales and facing supply shortages.”

Cities must act to secure the future of urban cycling: our research shows how (The Conversation)

The Conversation: Cities must act to secure the future of urban cycling: our research shows how. “Cities worldwide are preparing for the long transition out of lockdown. Physical distancing measures will be in place for many months, with impacts on all walks of life, not least transport. With public transport options running at low capacity and emerging evidence of the role of air quality and exercise in mitigating the risks of COVID-19, solutions are needed more than ever.”

Coronavirus: France offers subsidy to tempt lockdown cyclists (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: France offers subsidy to tempt lockdown cyclists. “France is encouraging people to cycle to keep pollution levels low once lockdown restrictions end. Under the €20 million (£17m; $21.7m) scheme, everyone will be eligible for bike repairs of up to €50 at registered mechanics. The funding will also help pay for cycle training and temporary parking spaces.”

UKAuthority: TfL launches Cycling Infrastructure Database

UKAuthority: TfL launches Cycling Infrastructure Database. “Transport for London (TfL) has launched the Cycling Infrastructure Database for the city, describing it as the largest of its kind. It contains the location of more than 240,000 pieces of infrastructure such as cycle lanes and parking spaces, and has been made available to all of London’s boroughs and released as open data for third party developers.”

Quartz: Cycling referees are incorporating social media into video replay reviews

Quartz: Cycling referees are incorporating social media into video replay reviews. “The World Cup isn’t the only major sporting event to introduce video-assisted refereeing, better known as VAR, this year. The Tour de France, currently in its third and final week, is being officiated with the help of replay technology for the first time in its 105 year history. In addition to footage from TV cameras, race officials—known in cycling as commissaires—are using another lens to judge the race: social media.”

Hidden City Philadelphia: Victorian-era Philly Bicycle Routes Now Available Online

Hidden City Philadelphia: Victorian-era Philly Bicycle Routes Now Available Online. “Cycling was immensely popular in the 1890’s, and Estoclet produced what seems to be a unique set of American narrative bike routes published in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The detailed routes and hand-drawn maps described and showed crossroads, geographic features, and towns in the surrounding area, as well as local gossip. This allowed readers and riders to follow along. The routes ran regularly from 1896 to 1898 as a column called ‘Trips Awheel: Where to Go and How to Get There,’ and then as part of a special travel insert, The Inquirer Roadster, sporadically for another few years. The routes for 1897 through 1898 have been transcribed and digitized by faculty and staff of Paul Robeson Library, Rutgers Camden, and are now available online. “

Bangor Daily News: This website helps you discover the perfect Maine bike route

Bangor Daily News: This website helps you discover the perfect Maine bike route. “It’s a familiar conundrum for bicycling enthusiasts — the desire to explore new roads or trails on two wheels competing with the fear of encountering monster hills, heavy vehicular traffic or simply getting lost on unfamiliar routes. Now, thanks to a new website launched last week by The Bicycle Coalition of Maine, much of that guess work is eliminated.”

Google Street View can estimate travel patterns in cities: Study (Zee Business)

Zee Business: Google Street View can estimate travel patterns in cities: Study. “Google Street View has the potential to estimate how common cycling is in cities, and potentially other travel patterns too, a study has found. The analysis of 2,000 Google Street View images from 1,000 random locations in each of 34 cities in the UK found strong agreement with data on cycling, and public transport and motorbike use, said researchers from the University of Cambridge in the UK.”