Free to Use and Reuse: Cycling Season Has Arrived! (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Free to Use and Reuse: Cycling Season Has Arrived!. “This month, as warmer weather signals the start of the cycling season, we’re adding to our Free to Use archive all kinds of themed content about bicycles. We’re including images portraying early women cyclers like Strage, but also historical ads featuring bicycles, cartoons, lithographs, maps and more. The Free to Use archive features themed sets of content (such as travel posters, presidential portraits, Civil War drawings, dogs and, now, bicycles) that are all free to use and reuse, meaning there are no known copyright restrictions associated with this content. In other words, you can do whatever you want with it.”

Bikerumor: Find your local frame builder with global map and database

Bikerumor: Find your local frame builder with global map and database. “The North American Handmade Bicycle Show is just around the corner, and frame builders from all around the world will begin to make the journey to Connecticut very soon. But when NAHBS is over, how will you find them? Sure, a number of frame builders have such a reputation that they’re easy to find, but others can be a little more obscure.”

The Free Press: Victoria man creates google map art on his bicycle

The Free Press: Victoria man creates google map art on his bicycle. “When ‘Cycleangelo’ finishes a piece of art, he has to step back in order to view it. In fact, he has to step so far back, he relies on satellites to view his final product. His brush strokes, some up to 220 kilometres long, are made with his bicycle, a map, and a GPS tracking device.”

PR Newswire: Getty Images acquires world leader in cycling photography TDWsport (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Getty Images acquires world leader in cycling photography TDWsport (PRESS RELEASE). “Getty Images, a world leader in visual communications, today announces it has acquired TDWsport, the world’s leading cycling photography business and archive. As part of the deal, Tim de Waele – owner of TDWsport and a 27-year veteran in the industry – has joined Getty Images as a staff photographer to lead the company’s cycling coverage.”

The Guardian: Google Maps must improve if it wants cyclists to use it

The Guardian: Google Maps must improve if it wants cyclists to use it. “Google Maps added a directions function for cyclists in 2010 in the US and Canada, and two years later across Europe. And while there are dozens of other apps now offering a similar service, Google Maps is the default for many. But the app seems to be falling behind expectations.”

Google Blog: Keep up with the Tour—or create your own—with Search and Maps

Google Blog: Keep up with the Tour—or create your own—with Search and Maps. “Now globally on the Google app for Android and iOS and the mobile web, when you search for Tour de France (or a similar query) on Google, you’ll see detailed information about the race and athletes as well as see the latest news stories. Most notably, you’ll also see the current standings of the race, which show jersey holders along with stage-by-stage results. As an added bonus, you’ll also have access to real-time update posts from the Tour de France directly in the search results.”

The Diaries And Photographs of a 19th Century Female Cycling Enthusiast

The University of Rochester is launched a site with the digitized diaries of a 19th century female cycling enthusiast. “Layered with original photographs, fabric swatches, correspondence, and other ephemera, the diaries, as the site notes, illustrate ‘the life of a single working woman set free by the bicycle and enlivened by friendships, the Kodak, the theatre, and a connection with the natural world.’ [May] Bragdon’s orbit included a constellation of family, coworkers, and friends, as well as obscure and well-known people. An avid cyclist and amateur photographer, Bragdon (1865-1947) cycled up to 13 miles a day. Her diaries contain dozens of photos that document Rochester’s active biking community at the turn of the 20th century.”