AFP: Cuban hip hop group shoots to world fame via social media

AFP: Cuban hip hop group shoots to world fame via social media. “With no other platform on which to ply their trade, 16-member Cuban dance troupe Datway (a play on That Way) have taken to Facebook and Instagram to display their unique brand of hip hop moves, blended with more traditional, home-grown styles. It has launched them to international fame, even catching the eye of Daddy Yankee, dubbed the King of Reggaeton — a Latin American music style that borrows heavily from hip hop and rap.”

Penn State Collegian: Penn State student-made database Éclaireur seeks to help ballet dancers further their careers

Penn State Collegian: Penn State student-made database Éclaireur seeks to help ballet dancers further their careers. “Dancers on the website who are looking for programs can search using factors like dates they are available, the location and their tuition budget… Some of the other search factors include in-person or online programs, as well as housing options.” I couldn’t find the actual URL for the database anywhere in the article! It’s https://www.eclaireur.info/ . The site is not finished yet and I couldn’t get some of the searches to work. But there’s already plenty here to browse.

Masked moves and ballet in the bath: a year of digital dance (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Masked moves and ballet in the bath: a year of digital dance. “At the beginning of the pandemic, the dance that appeared online was all about trying to connect. That’s what was moving about Birmingham Royal Ballet’s The Swan, or the Alvin Ailey company’s dancers performing Revelations in their New York apartments, or the companies doing their ritual daily class over Zoom and inviting us to watch or join in. It was a way of witnessing people apart but moving in harmony, absorbed in the same actions, finding a rhythm together, closing the distance.”

New York Times: On Ballet TikTok, a Place for Young Dancers to Be Real

New York Times: On Ballet TikTok, a Place for Young Dancers to Be Real. “As more and more stuck-at-home dancers join TikTok, it has also become a place to dissect some of the problems and clichés that dog ballet. Users make darkly funny memes about body dysmorphia, eating disorders, abusive teachers, misogyny and homophobia. They are the same issues that dance films and TV shows mine for drama and melodrama. But the wounded whimsy of ballet TikTok reflects what it actually feels like to be a ballet dancer — the frustrations and joys of a demanding, problematic, beautiful art.”

University of Alabama: UA Professor Receives Prestigious Grant to Create Digital Dance Archive

University of Alabama: UA Professor Receives Prestigious Grant to Create Digital Dance Archive. “Funded by a nearly $100,000, two-year National Endowment for the Humanities grant, [Professor Rebecca] Salzer is collaborating with University of Texas at Austin dance professor Gesel R. Mason and Alabama Digital Humanities Center director Dr. Anne Ladyem McDivitt to create an online archive based on Mason’s collection of recordings titled No Boundaries: Dancing the Visions of Contemporary Black Choreographers. The digital archive will be constructed using the open-source software CollectiveAccess, and will serve as a prototype for future dance archives.”

New Digital Exhibit THE CONSTELLATION PROJECT: MAPPING THE STARS OF BALLET Live Now (Broadway World)

Broadway World: New Digital Exhibit THE CONSTELLATION PROJECT: MAPPING THE STARS OF BALLET Live Now. “Memoirs of Blacks in Ballet’s (MoBBallet) newest digital exhibit ‘The Constellation Project: Mapping the Dark Stars of Ballet’ brings into view the lives, relationships and artistic collaborations of key Black ballet dancers to show their influence in the development of major Black dance organizations and American ballet as a whole. The exhibit uses art and graphic design to create a digital galaxy that is both visually compelling and educational.”

Vulture: Where to Stream Great Dance Performances

Vulture: Where to Stream Great Dance Performances. “You won’t be able to attend a dance performance for a while: For the next few months, it’s video or nothing. And there are certainly things you lose watching dance virtually, like the way a dancer’s gestures communicate directly to the watcher’s muscles (as she leaps, you feel yourself leaping too). But the screen doesn’t cut that link entirely. Watching a TikTok dance, you can choose to stay on the couch, but you are experiencing a little kinesthetic shudder in your lumbar region—it’s deep down, where the dance comes from. And what you can gain from on-camera dance is the screen’s pristine landscape view. Those 19th-century choreographers exploiting the wide architecture of the classical proscenium stage were designing for the wide shot long before there was one.”

The Hindu: Unboxing dancers on Instagram

The Hindu: Unboxing dancers on Instagram. “With venues closed for the foreseeable future due to the ongoing pandemic, dancers are looking for alternate stages. In Boxed, an online series curated by Chennai-based veteran dancer Anita Ratnam, they find the freedom to choose where they would like to dance. Even if it is a bathtub, a kitchen or a flight of stairs.”

Artnet: Are You an Artist Looking for Work? This New Website Wants to Connect You With Paying Customers Hungry to Learn How to Make Art

Artnet: Are You an Artist Looking for Work? This New Website Wants to Connect You With Paying Customers Hungry to Learn How to Make Art. “[The site] is designed to work similarly to TaskRabbit or Fiverr, websites that link gig workers to employers looking for people to do one-off jobs. It invites photographers, dancers, and website designers, among those in other disciplines, to sell their skills and knowledge to anyone looking for art lessons, or even to buy artworks. It’s free to sign up, and unlike other sites, HireArtists doesn’t collect a fee.”

Esquire: These ballet stars entertain millions via video conference and social media

Esquire: These ballet stars entertain millions via video conference and social media. “Ballet performers are some of the fittest on the planet, and many aren’t going to let the coronavirus get in the way of that. Stars of the American Ballet Theatres Isabella Boylson and James Whiteside have posted videos of them using a kitchen worktop as a stand-in ballet barre, while Russian Vadim Muntagirov – a dancer at the Royal Ballet in London – has posted videos of him pirouetting around the living room.”

The Citizen: A Facebook group that started in Harrisonburg connects people across the globe through dance

The Citizen: The Citizen: A Facebook group that started in Harrisonburg connects people across the globe through dance. “With countries banning mass gatherings and governments and health organizations are urging people to practice social distance to stop the spread of COVID-19, people are having to get creative to make contact with each other and unite amid being quarantined. After Virginia’s governor declared a state of emergency, one Harrisonburg resident started Dancing Resilience as a virtual dancing community to do just that. The aim of building this online community is to make people feel connected, but in another form, said Katie Mansfield, Dancing Resilience’s founder.”

Pointe: This New Instagram Account Calls Out Bad Imitations of Ballet in Advertising

Pointe: This New Instagram Account Calls Out Bad Imitations of Ballet in Advertising. “Let’s start with an undisputed fact: Ballet dancers work hard. Very hard. And yet they’re often underpaid, overworked and misunderstood by a society that idolizes tutus, toe shoes and a dancer’s physique, without understanding what’s behind it. So it’s no surprise that bunheads are left feeling frustrated when clothing companies and fashion magazines choose to hire models, rather than dancers, to show off their ballet-inspired wares.”

New Web Site Aggregates Resources for Freelancers Impacted by Coronavirus

A new Web site is working to aggregate information for freelancers impacted by COVID-19: COVID-19 Freelance Artist Resources. From the front page “This list is specifically designed to serve freelance artists, and those interested in supporting the independent artist community. This includes, but is not limited to, actors, designers, producers, technicians, stage managers, musicians, composers, choreographers, visual artists, filmmakers, craft artists, teaching artists, dancers, writers & playwrights, photographers, etc.”