ProPublica: Here’s How TurboTax Just Tricked You Into Paying to File Your Taxes

ProPublica: Here’s How TurboTax Just Tricked You Into Paying to File Your Taxes. “Did you know that if you make less than $66,000 a year, you can prepare and file your taxes for free? No? That’s no accident. Companies that make tax preparation software, like Intuit, the maker of TurboTax, would rather you didn’t know.”

KFGO: U.S. senators introduce social media bill to ban ‘dark patterns’ tricks

KFGO: U.S. senators introduce social media bill to ban ‘dark patterns’ tricks. “Two U.S. senators introduced a bill on Tuesday to ban online social media companies like Facebook Inc and Twitter Inc from tricking consumers into giving up their personal data. The bill from Mark Warner, a Democrat, and Deb Fischer, a Republican, would also ban online platforms with more than 100 million monthly active users from designing addicting games or other websites for children under age 13.”

Make Tech Easier: What You Need to Know About “Dark Patterns” and How They Trick Users

Make Tech Easier: What You Need to Know About “Dark Patterns” and How They Trick Users. “If you’ve ever accidentally subscribed to an email list, installed some software you didn’t want, or been tricked into needlessly sharing personal data, you’ve already experienced a dark pattern, or a maliciously-designed user interface.”

Ars Technica: Dark Patterns are designed to trick you (and they’re all over the Web)

Ars Technica: Dark Patterns are designed to trick you (and they’re all over the Web). “It happens to the best of us. After looking closely at a bank statement or cable bill, suddenly a small, unrecognizable charge appears. Fine print sleuthing soon provides the answer—somehow, you accidentally signed up for a service. Whether it was an unnoticed pre-marked checkbox or an offhanded verbal agreement at the end of a long phone call, now a charge arrives each month because naturally the promotion has ended. If the possibility of a refund exists, it’ll be found at the end of 45 minutes of holding music or a week’s worth of angry e-mails.”

WUOM: Anonymity drives ‘dark patterns’ of social media behavior

WUOM: Anonymity drives ‘dark patterns’ of social media behavior. “A new study by a Michigan State University researcher probes the mechanisms behind the spread of mass online harassment and fake news by looking at the ‘dark patterns’ underlying the technology platforms. In the science of user experience, dark patterns are psychological tricks incorporated into technology interfaces that are designed to get a user to do something they normally wouldn’t do, like buying a product or signing up for a newsletter.”