Texas A&M: Big data-derived tool facilitates closer monitoring of recovery from natural disasters

Texas A&M: Big data-derived tool facilitates closer monitoring of recovery from natural disasters. “By analyzing peoples’ visitation patterns to essential establishments like pharmacies, religious centers and grocery stores during Hurricane Harvey, researchers at Texas A&M University have developed a framework to assess the recovery of communities after natural disasters in near real time. They said the information gleaned from their analysis would help federal agencies allocate resources equitably among communities ailing from a disaster.”

Navigating the unCHARTed: web tool explores public sequencing data for cancer research (Morgridge Institute for Research)

Morgridge Institute for Research: Navigating the unCHARTed: web tool explores public sequencing data for cancer research. “In the past, traditional RNA sequencing methods were limited to bulk gene expression profiles averaging thousands of cells; but the development of single-cell RNA sequencing technology has helped cancer biologists better understand the specific mechanisms that lead to tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance. However, these large, complex datasets are often difficult to navigate. Morgridge Postdoctoral Fellow Matthew Bernstein developed a web tool to explore these public datasets and facilitate analysis for cancer researchers.”

UPI: Massive data-sharing effort to help doctors diagnose rare diseases across Europe

UPI: Massive data-sharing effort to help doctors diagnose rare diseases across Europe. “Doctors and medical researchers in Europe have undertaken a massive data-sharing project they hope will aid the diagnosis of rare disease. In a series of papers, published Tuesday in the European Journal of Human Genetics, researchers demonstrated how reanalysis of genomic and phenotypic data from patients with rare diseases — when combined with wide-scale data sharing — can increased the odds of accurate diagnosis.”

Eos: A New Tool May Make Geological Microscopy Data More Accessible

Eos: A New Tool May Make Geological Microscopy Data More Accessible. “Alex Steiner, a doctoral student at Michigan State University, had research to do working on thin sections—slivers of geological materials that are usually analyzed under a microscope. But he and the two undergraduate students on the project were not allowed to access the lab or the geological samples they were working on. Because, well, pandemic. It was out of this necessity that Steiner helped develop a new tool that could automatically take pictures of entire thin sections and stitch them into digital panoramic microscope images that could be analyzed anywhere.”

BetaKit: Biobox Analytics Launches Platform To Help Scientists Analyze Genomic Data

BetaKit: Biobox Analytics Launches Platform To Help Scientists Analyze Genomic Data. “Founded in 2019 by a trio of University of Toronto graduate students including [Christopher] Li, Hamza Farooq, and Julian Mazzitelli, BioBox offers a subscription-based data analytics platform for scientists working with next-generation sequencing data. The startup’s platform allows researchers to analyze genomic information.”

From Avocet to Zebra Finch: big data study finds more than 50 billion birds in the world (Phys .org)

Phys .org: From Avocet to Zebra Finch: big data study finds more than 50 billion birds in the world. “There are roughly 50 billion individual birds in the world, a new big data study by UNSW Sydney suggests—about six birds for every human on the planet. The study—which bases its findings on citizen science observations and detailed algorithms—estimates how many birds belong to 9700 different bird species, including flightless birds like emus and penguins.”

Phys .org: New AI-based tool can find rare cell populations in large single-cell datasets

Phys .org: New AI-based tool can find rare cell populations in large single-cell datasets. “Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have developed a first-of-its-kind artificial intelligence (AI)-based tool that can accurately identify rare groups of biologically important cells from single-cell datasets, which often contain gene or protein expression data from thousands of cells. The research was published today in Nature Computational Science.”

Digiday : Facebook is ‘not a researchers-friendly space’ say academics encountering roadblocks to analyzing its 2020 election ad data

Digiday: Facebook is ‘not a researchers-friendly space’ say academics encountering roadblocks to analyzing its 2020 election ad data. “Facebook is providing academic researchers with a massive data haul revealing how political ads during last year’s U.S. elections were targeted to people on the platform. However, researchers have been held up by an arduous process to access the data and worry the information is insufficient to provide meaningful analysis of how Facebook’s ad platform was used —and potentially misused — leading up to the election.”

Johns Hopkins University: Next-generation database will democratize access to massive amounts of turbulence data

Johns Hopkins University: Next-generation database will democratize access to massive amounts of turbulence data. “Led by Johns Hopkins University, a team of 10 researchers from three institutions is using a new $4 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to create a next-generation turbulence database that will enable groundbreaking research in engineering and the atmospheric and ocean sciences. This powerful tool will let researchers from all over the world access data from some of the largest world-class numerical simulations of turbulent flows. Such simulations are very costly and their outputs are traditionally very difficult to share among researchers due to the data sets’ massive size.”

The Program Era Project: Limning the depths of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop’s literary influence (University of Iowa)

University of Iowa: The Program Era Project: Limning the depths of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop’s literary influence. “The Program Era Project, or PEP, uses data visualization and other computer-assisted methods to track the aesthetic and cultural influence of the Workshop since its founding in 1936. In particular, writers affiliated with the Workshop, both as alumni and/or professors, have gone on to found or teach at many other creative writing programs around the nation…. The PEP, supported by the Digital Scholarship and Publishing Studio at UI Libraries, has compiled extensive datasets that track those networks of Workshop-affiliated writers.”

Cal Poly Pomona: Signs of Habitability in Venus’ Clouds Found Using 1978 Probe Data

Cal Poly Pomona: Signs of Habitability in Venus’ Clouds Found Using 1978 Probe Data. “Signs of biologically relevant chemicals, including phosphine, have been found in the clouds of Venus by a team led by Rakesh Mogul, professor of biological chemistry at Cal Poly Pomona. The data was discovered in archived data from NASA’s Pioneer Venus Multiprobe, which arrived at Venus and collected data almost 42 years ago.” We stan archived data.

The Guardian: Sperm whales in 19th century shared ship attack information

The Guardian: Sperm whales in 19th century shared ship attack information. “Using newly digitised logbooks detailing the hunting of sperm whales in the north Pacific, the authors discovered that within just a few years, the strike rate of the whalers’ harpoons fell by 58%. This simple fact leads to an astonishing conclusion: that information about what was happening to them was being collectively shared among the whales, who made vital changes to their behaviour. As their culture made fatal first contact with ours, they learned quickly from their mistakes.”

Vanderbilt: Vanderbilt scientists sketch rare star system using more than a century of astronomical observations

Vanderbilt: Vanderbilt scientists sketch rare star system using more than a century of astronomical observations. “Vanderbilt astronomers have painted their best picture yet of an RV Tauri variable—a rare type of stellar binary, in which two stars orbit each other within a sprawling disk of dust. To sketch its characteristics, the scientists mined a 130-year dataset that spans the widest range of light yet collected for one of these systems, from radio waves to X-rays.”