Boston University School of Medicine: New Open-Source Bioinformatics Tool Identifies Factors Responsible for Diseases

Boston University School of Medicine: New Open-Source Bioinformatics Tool Identifies Factors Responsible for Diseases. “Researchers have developed and tested a new computational tool, Candidate Driver Analysis (CaDrA), which will search for combinations of factors that are likely to cause a specific disease. CaDrA recognizes that diseases are complex and likely induced by multiple causes. It is now available free to members of the research community. To measure CaDrA’s ability to select sets of genomic features that are responsible for certain oncogenic phenotypes in cancer, the researchers performed extensive evaluations based on simulated data, as well as real genomic data from cancer cell lines and primary human tumors. The results from their simulations showed CaDrA has high sensitivity for mid- to large-sized datasets, and high specificity for all sample sizes considered.”

Yeshiva University: Data-Driven Torah

Yeshiva University: Data-Driven Torah. “Since the introduction of the Bar Ilan Responsa database a generation ago, much discussion has focused on how accessibility and searchability change the landscape of Torah study and halachic [Jewish legal] decision-making, for better or worse. More recently, a new model has emerged, according to which texts are data, vast sets of individual pieces of information linked in different ways. Two projects can help illustrate where this is headed.”

CBC: Twitter trolls stoked debates about immigrants and pipelines in Canada, data show

CBC: Twitter trolls stoked debates about immigrants and pipelines in Canada, data show. “Twitter trolls linked to suspected foreign influence campaigns stoked controversy over pipelines and immigration in Canada, according to a CBC/Radio-Canada analysis of 9.6 million tweets from accounts since deleted. Roughly 21,600 tweets from those troll accounts directly targeted Canadians — many of them with messages critical of Canadian pipeline projects and tweets that highlighted divisions over Canada’s policies on immigration and refugees.”

New York University: Research to Use Innovative Data Science Tools to Study Pretrial Detention in More than 1,000 U.S. Counties

New York University: Research to Use Innovative Data Science Tools to Study Pretrial Detention in More than 1,000 U.S. Counties. “A team of researchers from NYU’s Public Safety Lab will use data science techniques to study the impacts of pretrial detention in more than 1,000 U.S. counties—including many rural counties that have remained largely unstudied.”

Factor Daily: Data is India’s handicap in AI but help is at hand

Factor Daily: Data is India’s handicap in AI but help is at hand. “The global race in artificial intelligence is like the space race of the 20th century with large powers vying for the pole position. China currently leads the pack with countries such as the US and Israel trailing behind. India too has big ambitions in this race. The government announced last week that it plans to set up a National Centre for Artificial Intelligence to help citizens benefit from AI and related technologies.”

EU Science Hub: New Urban Centres Database sets new standards for information on cities at global scale

EU Science Hub: New Urban Centres Database sets new standards for information on cities at global scale. “Building on the Global Human Settlement Layer (GHSL), the new database provides more detailed information on the cities’ location and size as well as characteristics such as greenness, night time light emission, population size, the built-up areas exposed to natural hazards, and travel time to the capital city. For several of these attributes, the database contains information recorded over time, dating as far back as 1975.” The database covers over 10,000 cities worldwide.

EurekAlert: Next-generation big data analytics tools will make sense of streaming data in real time

EurekAlert: Next-generation big data analytics tools will make sense of streaming data in real time . “With a three-year, $499,753 grant from the National Science Foundation, Elke Rundensteiner, professor of computer science and director of WPI’s Data Science Program, is leading a team of computer science and data science students that is building a next-generation event trend analysis tool known as SETA (Scalable Event Trend Analytics). This open-source software will be used not just to find patterns in real-time, high-volume data streams (“data in motion”), but to analyze those patterns and make sense of them on the fly for just-in-time decision making.”