Cal Poly Pomona: Signs of Habitability in Venus’ Clouds Found Using 1978 Probe Data

Cal Poly Pomona: Signs of Habitability in Venus’ Clouds Found Using 1978 Probe Data. “Signs of biologically relevant chemicals, including phosphine, have been found in the clouds of Venus by a team led by Rakesh Mogul, professor of biological chemistry at Cal Poly Pomona. The data was discovered in archived data from NASA’s Pioneer Venus Multiprobe, which arrived at Venus and collected data almost 42 years ago.” We stan archived data.

The Guardian: Sperm whales in 19th century shared ship attack information

The Guardian: Sperm whales in 19th century shared ship attack information. “Using newly digitised logbooks detailing the hunting of sperm whales in the north Pacific, the authors discovered that within just a few years, the strike rate of the whalers’ harpoons fell by 58%. This simple fact leads to an astonishing conclusion: that information about what was happening to them was being collectively shared among the whales, who made vital changes to their behaviour. As their culture made fatal first contact with ours, they learned quickly from their mistakes.”

Vanderbilt: Vanderbilt scientists sketch rare star system using more than a century of astronomical observations

Vanderbilt: Vanderbilt scientists sketch rare star system using more than a century of astronomical observations. “Vanderbilt astronomers have painted their best picture yet of an RV Tauri variable—a rare type of stellar binary, in which two stars orbit each other within a sprawling disk of dust. To sketch its characteristics, the scientists mined a 130-year dataset that spans the widest range of light yet collected for one of these systems, from radio waves to X-rays.”

University of Virginia: Why Everything We Thought We Knew About Corporate Governance Is Wrong

University of Virginia: Why Everything We Thought We Knew About Corporate Governance Is Wrong. “Nearly two decades of influential scholarship on how corporations are governed and valued is based on bad data, according to new research co-authored by Cathy Hwang of the University of Virginia School of Law. The paper, ‘Cleaning Corporate Governance,’ reveals that an index cited thousands of times by scholars to measure corporate governance and shareholder rights is riddled with errors. Written by Hwang, Columbia Law School postdoctoral fellow Jens Frankenreiter, Wisconsin law professor Yaron Nili and Columbia law professor Eric L. Talley, the new research also offers a dataset with pilot data to rectify the problem, creating a clearer picture about the power dynamics that control corporations and what that might imply in terms of profit potential, valuation and long-term prospects, among other business factors.”

Europeana Pro: Pioneering AI for digital cultural heritage – an interview with Dr Emmanuelle Bermes

Europeana Pro: Pioneering AI for digital cultural heritage – an interview with Dr Emmanuelle Bermes. “On Europeana Pro this month, we are exploring Artificial Intelligence (AI) related activities in the cultural heritage sector, and shining a light on women leading research, projects and work in this area. Today, Dr Emmanuelle Bermes of the National Library of France discusses the enormous potential of AI for large collections – and the challenge of realising it!”

Yale: Yale study shows limitations of applying artificial intelligence to registry databases

Yale: Yale study shows limitations of applying artificial intelligence to registry databases. “Artificial intelligence will play a pivotal role in the future of health care, medical experts say, but so far, the industry has been unable to fully leverage this tool. A Yale study has illuminated the limitations of these analytics when applied to traditional medical databases — suggesting that the key to unlocking their value may be in the way datasets are prepared.”

News@Northeastern: These Researchers Are Predicting Covid-19 Trends Weeks Before Standard Surveillance

News@Northeastern: These Researchers Are Predicting Covid-19 Trends Weeks Before Standard Surveillance. “Imagine trying to avoid a car crash. Every split second you spend deliberating what to do, you waste precious time needed to alter your course. Any delay between your brain’s perception of danger and your foot’s contact with the brake could mean the difference between life or death. Members of Northeastern’s Laboratory for the Modeling of Biological and Socio-technical Systems (MOBS) apply the same metaphor to COVID-19 response policies in their new paper, which outlines an early warning system that can predict coronavirus trends weeks in advance of standard surveillance techniques.”

Harvard Business Review: 4 Ways to Democratize Data Science in Your Organization

Harvard Business Review: 4 Ways to Democratize Data Science in Your Organization. “Many organizations have begun their data science journeys by starting ‘centers of excellence,’ hiring the best data scientists they can and focusing their efforts where there is lots of data. In some respects, this makes good sense — after all, they don’t want to be late to the artificial intelligence or machine learning party. Plus, data scientists want to show off their latest tools. But is this the best way to deploy this rare resource? For most companies, we think it unlikely. Rather, we advise companies to see data science both more strategically and broadly.”

MIT News: When more Covid-19 data doesn’t equal more understanding

MIT News: When more Covid-19 data doesn’t equal more understanding. “Since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, charts and graphs have helped communicate information about infection rates, deaths, and vaccinations. In some cases, such visualizations can encourage behaviors that reduce virus transmission, like wearing a mask. Indeed, the pandemic has been hailed as the breakthrough moment for data visualization. But new findings suggest a more complex picture. A study from MIT shows how coronavirus skeptics have marshalled data visualizations online to argue against public health orthodoxy about the benefits of mask mandates.”

Poynter: It’s time for data visualizations to be more inclusive of gender information

Poynter: It’s time for data visualizations to be more inclusive of gender information. “For decades, visualizations that display gender data have promoted a binary mindset, which marginalizes and excludes those who don’t identify as strictly male or female. Nonbinary concepts of gender are becoming more and more accepted, and the distinction between assigned sex and gender is finally being recognized on a societal scale. Our data should reflect this.”

University of Georgia: New data traces rise, fall of the Freedman’s Bank

University of Georgia: New data traces rise, fall of the Freedman’s Bank. “In 1865, the U.S. government established the Freedman’s Savings and Trust Co. in to help newly emancipated communities gain a financial footing. With 37 branches across the South and in New York, the bank initially flourished and grew to include more than 100,000 customers. But it collapsed in June 1874 after the Financial Panic of 1873. Some of the Freedman’s Bank records have been lost to time, but many still exist. [Professor Malcom] Wardlaw and his Ph.D. student, Virginia Traweek, found the archived records and decided to analyze the data to see what they could discover about African American communities after the Civil War.”

Democrats to DeSantis: Rescind job offer to coronavirus conspiracy theorist (Tampa Bay Times)

Tampa Bay Times: Democrats to DeSantis: Rescind job offer to coronavirus conspiracy theorist. “Nearly all members of Florida’s Democratic congressional delegation sent a letter Thursday to Gov. Ron DeSantis demanding that he remove Kyle Lamb, an Ohio sports blogger who has spread coronavirus conspiracy theories on the Internet, from his position as a data analyst at the governor’s office.”

ReliefWeb: Google and FAO launch new Big Data tool for all

ReliefWeb: Google and FAO launch new Big Data tool for all. “Earth Map is an innovative and free-to-use Web-based tool to provide efficient, rapid, inexpensive and analytically cogent insights, drawn from satellites as well as [Food and Agriculture Organization]’s considerable wealth of agriculturally relevant data, with a few clicks on a computer. Earth Map has also been designed to empower and provide integrative synergies with the federated FAO’s Hand-in-Hand geospatial platform, a more comprehensive tool to provide Members, their partners and donors with the means to identify and execute highly-targeted rural development initiatives with multiple goals ranging from climate adaptation and mitigation to socio-economic resilience.”

The Next Web: COVID-19 made your data set worthless. Now what?

The Next Web: COVID-19 made your data set worthless. Now what?. “The COVID-19 pandemic has perplexed data scientists and creators of machine learning tools as the sudden and major change in consumer behavior has made predictions based on historical data nearly useless. There is also very little point in trying to train new prediction models during the crisis, as one simply cannot predict chaos. While these challenges could shake our perception of what artificial intelligence really is (and is not), they might also foster the development of tools that could automatically adjust.”

Data Theatre: Why the Digital Dashboards of Dominic Cummings may not help with COVID (Martin Robbins)

Martin Robbins: Data Theatre: Why the Digital Dashboards of Dominic Cummings may not help with COVID. “The tech industry is an increasingly metrics- and data-obsessed culture. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing: product managers who expose themselves to user research studies and engagement analytics will tend to make smarter decisions, on average, then those who ignore them. The problem, as with any technique or approach, is when data becomes the end rather than the means; when teams and managers start to develop cargo-cult attitudes toward it.”