Engadget: Unsecured database exposed millions of Instagram influencers

Engadget: Unsecured database exposed millions of Instagram influencers. “A database containing contact information for millions of Instagram influencers was reportedly found online, exposing info like phone numbers and email addresses for celebrities, influencers and brand accounts. According to TechCrunch, the database was hosted on Amazon Web Services and left without a password. It contained as many as 49 million records.”

CNET: Your most sensitive data is likely exposed online. These people try to find it

CNET: Your most sensitive data is likely exposed online. These people try to find it. “[Justin] Paine is part of an informal army of web researchers who indulge an obscure passion: scouring the internet for unsecured databases. The databases — unencrypted and in plain sight — can contain all sorts of sensitive information, including names, addresses, telephone numbers, bank details, Social Security numbers and medical diagnoses. In the wrong hands, the data could be exploited for fraud, identity theft or blackmail.”

Forbes: Samsung Investigates Massive Data Leak — What You Need To Know

Forbes: Samsung Investigates Massive Data Leak — What You Need To Know. “A security researcher has revealed that a whole load of sensitive information has been inadvertently made accessible to the public on GitLab. Nothing so unusual about that you might think. However, the information concerned included source code, credentials and secret keys for various projects. Still nothing too out of the ordinary you say? Here’s the thing, the Vandev Lab Gitlab instance in question was one used by Samsung staff to work on code for various projects including the SmartThings and Bixby platforms.”

Engadget: AMC accidentally exposed data on 1.6 million subscribers

Engadget: AMC accidentally exposed data on 1.6 million subscribers. “A security researcher discovered that AMC Networks had inadvertently exposed more than 1.6 million records of subscribers to the company’s two premium streaming video platforms, Sundance Now and Shudder. The publicly accessible database included the names and email addresses of subscribers as well as details about their subscription plans. It included more than 3,000 invoices processed by Stripe that listed the last four digits of a user’s credit card.”

TechCrunch: Security lapse exposed a Chinese smart city surveillance system

TechCrunch: Security lapse exposed a Chinese smart city surveillance system. “Smart cities are designed to make life easier for their residents: better traffic management by clearing routes, making sure the public transport is running on time and having cameras keeping a watchful eye from above. But what happens when that data leaks? One such database was open for weeks for anyone to look inside.”

Dark Reading: Misconfigured Ladders Database Exposed 13M User Records

Dark Reading: Misconfigured Ladders Database Exposed 13M User Records. “Another company has misconfigured another AWS-hosted database, and this time the results are 13 million user profiles exposed. Employment-recruitment site Ladders exposed the records of job seekers who had signed up for the possibility of landing a high-end position.”

CNET: Cloud database removed after exposing details on 80 million US households

CNET: Cloud database removed after exposing details on 80 million US households. “In a blow to consumers’ privacy, the addresses and demographic details of more than 80 million US households were exposed on an unsecured database stored on the cloud, independent security researchers have found. The details included names, ages and genders as well as income levels and marital status. The researchers, led by Noam Rotem and Ran Locar, were unable to identify the owner of the database, which until Monday was online and required no password to access. Some of the information was coded, like gender, marital status and income level. Names, ages and addresses were not coded.”