Morgridge Institute for Research: New search app gleans ‘collective consciousness’ from a massive research database

Morgridge Institute for Research: New search app gleans ‘collective consciousness’ from a massive research database. “The PubMed database contains more than 33 million papers that represent the ‘collective consciousness’ of what humans know about biomedicine. It is impossible for researchers to keep up with this vast literature where more than 1,000 new papers get added daily. A new web application, KinderMiner Web, developed by Ron Stewart’s Bioinformatics Group at the Morgridge Institute for Research, gives researchers a fighting chance.”

The Conversation: Charities are contributing to growing mistrust of mental-health text support — here’s why

The Conversation: Charities are contributing to growing mistrust of mental-health text support — here’s why. “Like many areas of society, mental healthcare has changed drastically as a result of the pandemic. Forced to adapt to a growing demand for counselling and crisis services, mental health charities have had to quickly increase their digital services to meet the needs of their users…. Recently, two charities faced a public backlash as a result of how they used machine learning and handled data from users who contacted their mental health support services at a point of crisis.”

Inderscience: How to best analyze big social data

Inderscience: How to best analyze big social data . “Big data is big, as it were, and the buzz phrase is often accompanied by associated terms such as data mining, machine learning, computational intelligence, the semantic web, and social networks. Research published in the International Journal of Cloud Computing looks at big data in this context and asks how social big data might best be analyzed with state-of-the-art tools to allow us to extract new knowledge.”

New York Times: How Data Is Reshaping Real Estate

New York Times: How Data Is Reshaping Real Estate. “The added layers of technology in stores and entertainment venues — crowd-tracking cameras, information gleaned from smartphones, tallies of neighborhood foot traffic and sophisticated demographic data — aim to replicate the data measurement and analysis of the online experience. But privacy advocates are sounding the alarm about the technology as Big Tech is under increased scrutiny.”

Penn State News: What was really the secret behind Van Gogh’s success?

Penn State News: What was really the secret behind Van Gogh’s success?. “By using artificial intelligence to mine big data related to artists, film directors and scientists, the researchers discovered this pattern is not uncommon but, instead, a magical formula. Hot streaks, they found, directly result from years of exploration (studying diverse styles or topics) immediately followed by years of exploitation (focusing on a narrow area to develop deep expertise).”

Quanta Magazine: How Big Data Carried Graph Theory Into New Dimensions

Quanta Magazine: How Big Data Carried Graph Theory Into New Dimensions. “Graph theory isn’t enough. The mathematical language for talking about connections, which usually depends on networks — vertices (dots) and edges (lines connecting them) — has been an invaluable way to model real-world phenomena since at least the 18th century. But a few decades ago, the emergence of giant data sets forced researchers to expand their toolboxes and, at the same time, gave them sprawling sandboxes in which to apply new mathematical insights. Since then, said Josh Grochow, a computer scientist at the University of Colorado, Boulder, there’s been an exciting period of rapid growth as researchers have developed new kinds of network models that can find complex structures and signals in the noise of big data.”

Penn State: Mining Twitter data may help National Parks staff gather feedback faster

Penn State: Mining Twitter data may help National Parks staff gather feedback faster. “The National Park system has been referred to as one of America’s national treasures. A team of Penn State researchers in the department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Management and the Social Science Research Institute, report that mining tweets about the park may open up a rich vein of information that could lead to better service for park visitors while still protecting these national treasures and their wildlife.”

EurekAlert: KDD 2020 showcases brighest minds in data science and AI

EurekAlert: KDD 2020 showcases brighest minds in data science and AI. “The Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (ACM SIGKDD) will hold its flagship annual conference, KDD 2020, virtually, August 23-27. The KDD conference series, started in 1989, is the world’s oldest and largest data mining conference, and is the venue where concepts such as big data, data science, predictive analytics and crowdsourcing were first introduced. Continuing this tradition, KDD 2020 will showcase leading-edge research papers in data science, data mining, knowledge discovery, large-scale data analytics and big data.”

Guelph Now: Researchers Develop New Method Of Analyzing Social Media Data To Identify Potential Disease Outbreaks

Guelph Now: Researchers Develop New Method Of Analyzing Social Media Data To Identify Potential Disease Outbreaks. “A new method to analyze social media data could help predict future outbreaks of diseases and viruses like COVID-19 and the measles. In a new study, researchers from the University of Waterloo examined computer simulations to develop a new method of analyzing interactions on social media that can predict when a disease outbreak is likely.”

Scientific American: Supercomputer Scours Fossil Record for Earth’s Hidden Extinctions

Scientific American: Supercomputer Scours Fossil Record for Earth’s Hidden Extinctions. “Using the world’s fourth most powerful supercomputer, Tianhe II, a team of scientists based mostly in China mined a database of more than 11,000 fossil species that lived from around 540 million to 250 million years ago. The result is a history of life during this period, the early Palaeozoic era, that can pinpoint the rise and fall of species during diversifications and mass extinctions to within about 26,000 years.”

International News Media Association: Introducing Cicero AI, Globe and Mail’s information mining tool

International News Media Association (INMA): Introducing Cicero AI, Globe and Mail’s information mining tool. “Cicero, named for the Roman orator, was created by our data scientists through conversations with the editor-in-chief and editorial staff. It’s an Artificial Intelligence platform used to reduce reporters’ manual work while helping them find connections and providing more transparency to readers for increased engagement.”

EurekAlert: Data mining applied to scholarly publications to finally reveal Earth’s biodiversity

EurekAlert: Data mining applied to scholarly publications to finally reveal Earth’s biodiversity. “The Biodiversity Literature Repository (BLR), a joint project of Plazi, Pensoft and Zenodo at CERN, takes on the challenge to open up the access to the data trapped in scientific publications, and find out how many species we know so far, what are their most important characteristics (also referred to as descriptions or taxonomic treatments), and how they look on various images. To do so, BLR uses highly standardised formats and terminology, typical for scientific publications, to discover and extract data from text written primarily for human consumption.”

Quartz: The IRS wants to use social media to catch tax cheats

Quartz: The IRS wants to use social media to catch tax cheats. “The Internal Revenue Service is looking for ways to scour social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter in its ongoing quest to catch tax cheats. That’s according to a request for information issued December 18 by the IRS’s National Office of Procurement. The mining of social media data by the agency has been suspected in the past, but the IRS has never before confirmed the practice.”

Harvard Business Review: How the Data That Internet Companies Collect Can Be Used for the Public Good

Harvard Business Review: How the Data That Internet Companies Collect Can Be Used for the Public Good. “We live in a quantified era. It is estimated that 90% of the world’s data was generated in the last two years — from which entirely new inferences can be extracted and applied to help address some of today’s most vexing problems. In particular, the vast streams of data generated through social media platforms, when analyzed responsibly, can offer insights into societal patterns and behaviors. These types of behaviors are hard to generate with existing social science methods. All this information poses its own problems, of complexity and noise, of risks to privacy and security, but it also represents tremendous potential for mobilizing new forms of intelligence.”