The Verge: Congress is split over your right to sue Facebook

The Verge: Congress is split over your right to sue Facebook. “Should private citizens be able to sue companies like Facebook or Twitter for misusing their data? That’s the question Republicans and Democrats have been ensnared in for months, as they work to craft a new data privacy law. But talks have stalled in recent weeks, and rather than putting out a bipartisan bill, both parties have now opted to introduce their own measures to stake out their positions.”

Japan Times: Google restricts data-sharing for ads under EU privacy pressure

Japan Times: Google restricts data-sharing for ads under EU privacy pressure. “Starting in February, Google will no longer divulge information to participants in its ad auction about the type of content on a website or page where an ad could appear, the Alphabet Inc. company said in a blog post Thursday.”

The Register: Microsoft embraces California data privacy law – don’t expect Google to follow suit

The Register: Microsoft embraces California data privacy law – don’t expect Google to follow suit . “Microsoft has said that not only will it embrace a new data privacy law in California, due to come into force in the New Year, but will extend the same protections to everyone in the US.”

New York Times: Building a World Where Data Privacy Exists Online

New York Times: Building a World Where Data Privacy Exists Online. “Dawn Song, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and one of the world’s foremost experts in computer security and trustworthy artificial intelligence, envisions a new paradigm in which people control their data and are compensated for its use by corporations. While there have been many proposals for such a system, Professor Song is one actually building the platform to make it a reality.”

Ars Technica: Proposed data privacy law could send company execs to prison for 20 years

Ars Technica: Proposed data privacy law could send company execs to prison for 20 years. “A US senator has proposed a privacy law that could issue steep fines to companies and send their top executives to prison for up to 20 years if they violate Americans’ privacy. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. announced a discussion draft of his Consumer Data Protection Act yesterday. The bill would establish new privacy rules that major companies must follow and establish fines and prison sentences big enough to make even the largest companies take notice.”