AL .com: Hey, Alabama, public data are public documents, too

AL .com: Hey, Alabama, public data are public documents, too. “David Simpson is curious, which is a good thing for a researcher to be. Simpson is a PhD student studying political science at Columbia University. Also, he’s an Alabama native. So when it came time to direct his study to a particular interest, he naturally turned his attention to his home state.”

Nature: Hundreds of extreme self-citing scientists revealed in new database

Nature: Hundreds of extreme self-citing scientists revealed in new database. “[Sundarapandian] Vaidyanathan, a computer scientist at the Vel Tech R&D Institute of Technology, a privately run institute, is an extreme example: he has received 94% of his citations from himself or his co-authors up to 2017, according to a study in PLoS Biology this month1. He is not alone. The data set, which lists around 100,000 researchers, shows that at least 250 scientists have amassed more than 50% of their citations from themselves or their co-authors, while the median self-citation rate is 12.7%.”

University of Alberta: First global open-source database for spinal cord injury research will be a ‘game-changer,’ say experts

University of Alberta: First global open-source database for spinal cord injury research will be a ‘game-changer,’ say experts. “Experts from the University of Alberta and two universities of California are teaming up to launch the world’s first open-source database for spinal cord injury research. The Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research (ODC-SCI) will improve research and treatment worldwide by making data more accessible, according to researchers and patients.”

StateScoop: Crowdsourced environment data gets a home on Louisville Data Commons

StateScoop: Crowdsourced environment data gets a home on Louisville Data Commons. “The ‘Louisville Data Commons’ repository, announced by the University of Louisville on Tuesday, is an open-data website that will incorporate data contributions from residents and researchers to keep track of the city’s environmental and health-related measurements. The community-gathered data will be available for research for a minimum of one year, according to the site, while some larger, frequently updated data sets will be available indefinitely.”

Ars Technica: AI researchers have a plan to pay patients for data

Ars Technica: AI researchers have a plan to pay patients for data. “Robert Chang, a Stanford ophthalmologist, normally stays busy prescribing drops and performing eye surgery. But a few years ago, he decided to jump on a hot new trend in his field: artificial intelligence. Doctors like Chang often rely on eye imaging to track the development of conditions like glaucoma. With enough scans, he reasoned, he might find patterns that could help him better interpret test results. That is, if he could get his hands on enough data.”

Fast Company: The world’s most-advanced AI can’t tell what’s in these photos. Can you?

Fast Company: The world’s most-advanced AI can’t tell what’s in these photos. Can you?. “Is that a manhole cover or dragonfly sitting on a table? Is that a green iguana or just a squirrel running with some nuts? Is that a unicycle or a crocodile crossing the road? To humans, the answer is obvious. But the best image-identifying artificial intelligence in the world hasn’t a clue.”

University of Southern California: Tackling Lack of Diversity in Genetics Research

University of Southern California: Tackling Lack of Diversity in Genetics Research. “Genotyping, or determining which genetic variants an individual possesses, has paved the way for understanding how common variations in our DNA can be associated with health conditions like heart disease and diabetes. The hope is to determine your risk of developing a disease and, hopefully, prevent it. But if you’re not white, the science may fall short.”