Phys .org: Multidisciplinary study provides new insights about French Revolution

Phys .org: Multidisciplinary study provides new insights about French Revolution. “New research from experts in history, computer science and cognitive science shines fresh light on the French Revolution, showing how rhetorical and institutional innovations won acceptance for the ideas that built the French republic’s foundation and inspired future democracies. The researchers, including an Indiana University professor, doctoral student and undergraduate, used data-mining techniques to comb through transcripts of 40,000 speeches from the two-year tenure of the National Constituent Assembly, the first parliament of the revolution.”

PR Newswire: Pulsar Launches “Google Trends” for Social Media (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Pulsar Launches “Google Trends” for Social Media (PRESS RELEASE.) “Audience intelligence platform Pulsar has launched a new product that lets users map real-time and historical trends instantly with access to 12 years worth of public data, from the very first Tweet back in March 2006 to today…. TRENDS is the first Pulsar product to be commercialised with a freemium model: users are able to access real-time TRENDS for free and only have to purchase a subscription to access historical TRENDS. Subscribers have access to unlimited data and unlimited queries for a flat 12 month fee which makes the user experience extremely flexible.”

New York Times: In 83 Million Eviction Records, a Sweeping and Intimate New Look at Housing in America

New York Times: In 83 Million Eviction Records, a Sweeping and Intimate New Look at Housing in America. “Two years ago, Mr. [Matthew] Desmond turned eviction into a national topic of conversation with ‘Evicted,’ a book that chronicled how poor families who lost their homes in Milwaukee sank ever deeper into poverty…. But for all the attention the problem began to draw, even Mr. Desmond could not say how widespread it was. Surveys of renters have tried to gauge displacement, but there is no government data tracking all eviction cases in America. Now that Mr. Desmond has been mining court records across the country to build a database of millions of evictions, it’s clear even in his incomplete national picture that they are more rampant in many places than what he saw in Milwaukee.”

Local Transport Today: Uber launches London journey time database

Local Transport Today: Uber launches London journey time database. “Uber has launched a free to access web-based database of road journey time data for London based on aggregated Uber journeys. Uber Movement for London does not provide information about Ubers’ movements around London. Rather it is a database of aggregate journey time data, which does not reveal how many trips have been aggregated in order to answer your query.”

ScienceBlog: Computer Searches Telescope Data For Evidence Of Distant Planets

ScienceBlog: Computer Searches Telescope Data For Evidence Of Distant Planets. “As part of an effort to identify distant planets hospitable to life, NASA has established a crowdsourcing project in which volunteers search telescopic images for evidence of debris disks around stars, which are good indicators of exoplanets. Using the results of that project, researchers at MIT have now trained a machine-learning system to search for debris disks itself. The scale of the search demands automation: There are nearly 750 million possible light sources in the data accumulated through NASA’s Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission alone.”

Linux Insider: SpaceChain, Arch Aim to Archive Human Knowledge in Space

Linux Insider: SpaceChain, Arch Aim to Archive Human Knowledge in Space. “SpaceChain on Monday announced that it has entered a partnership with the Arch Mission Foundation to use open source technology to launch an ambitious project involving the storage of large data sets in spacecraft and on other planets. Arch Mission will load large quantities of data onto SpaceChain’s satellite vehicles with the eventual aim of storing data on other planets.” This is from a couple of weeks ago but I had not seen it before.

UCLA: Tapping Twitter to Understand Crowd Behavior and Protest

UCLA: Tapping Twitter to Understand Crowd Behavior and Protests. “[Zachary] Steinert-Threlkeld created a guide for acquiring and working with data sets culled from Twitter, which has more than 320 million global accounts generating more than half a billion messages every day. His efforts culminated this year with the publication of ‘Twitter as Data,’ the first guide in Cambridge University Press’ new Elements series on Quantitative and Computational Methods for Social Science. The series provides short introductions and hands-on tutorials to new and innovative research methodologies that may not yet appear in textbooks.” The book is free online “for a limited time”.