Online Journalism Blog: 10 principles for data journalism in its second decade

Online Journalism Blog: 10 principles for data journalism in its second decade. “In 2007 Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel published The Elements of Journalism. With the concept of ‘journalism’ increasingly challenged by the fact that anyone could now publish to mass audiences, their principles represented a welcome platform-neutral attempt to articulate exactly how journalism could be untangled from the vehicles that carried it and the audiences it commanded. In this extract from a forthcoming book chapter* I attempt to use Kovach and Rosenstiel’s principles (outlined in part 1 here) as the basis for a set that might form a basis for (modern) data journalism as it enters its second and third decades.”

The Atlantic: Huge DNA Databases Reveal the Recent Evolution of Humans

The Atlantic: Huge DNA Databases Reveal the Recent Evolution of Humans
. “When we talk about human evolution, we usually talk about how we evolved into humans: how we lost body hair, gained brain mass, started to walk on two feet—in short, things that happened millions of years ago. But evolution did not stop when the first modern humans emerged. A new study of two massive genetic databases—one in the United Kingdom and one in California—suggests genetic mutations that shorten lifespans have been weeded out since, and are possibly still in the process of being weeded out today.”

Penn State Daily Collegian: Here’s how Penn State professor Mark Ballora transforms data sets to instrumental music

Penn State Daily Collegian: Here’s how Penn State professor Mark Ballora transforms data sets to instrumental music. “Many people use data sets to form a line on a graph. But Mark Ballora, a professor of music technology, maps data to auditory characteristics — such as pitches and loudness — and creates music in the process. This technique, which is called ‘sonification,’ is Ballora’s specialty. He’s used it on a variety of natural phenomena such as the aurora borealis and tropical storms.”

Rice University: Mapping Tool Helps Neighborhoods Better Understand Harvey, Houston

Rice University: Mapping Tool Helps Neighborhoods Better Understand Harvey, Houston. “In the wake of Harvey, there’s been a need for good data: whether its emissions information from industries along the port, maps of the flooding to see which areas were hardest hit or information about students who have been shuffled around after their schools suffered damage from the storm. As part of an ongoing effort with its roots well before storm, the Kinder Institute is unveiling its Houston Community Data Connections dashboard. After gathering and geocoding a number of datasets, the Kinder Institute’s data team, led by Jie Wu and Mingming Zhang, created a visualization tool that allows users to visualize several layered datasets at once.”

Newswise: Scientists Want to Study Your Tweets; Is It Ethical?

Newswise: Scientists Want to Study Your Tweets; Is It Ethical?. “Did you know researchers are reading and analyzing your tweets and Facebook posts in the name of science? If so, how do you feel about it? If you feel unsettled, what would make you feel better? What’s legal and what’s not in the age of big-data research? And even if it is legal, is it ethical?”

The Atlantic: The Case for Sharing All of America’s Data on Mosquitoes

The Atlantic: The Case for Sharing All of America’s Data on Mosquitoes. “For decades, agencies around the United States have been collecting data on mosquitoes. Biologists set traps, dissect captured insects, and identify which species they belong to. They’ve done this for millions of mosquitoes, creating an unprecedented trove of information—easily one of the biggest long-term attempts to monitor any group of animals, if not the very biggest. The problem, according to Micaela Elvira Martinez from Princeton University and Samuel Rund from the University of Notre Dame, is that this treasure trove of data isn’t all in the same place, and only a small fraction of it is public. The rest is inaccessible, hoarded by local mosquito-control agencies around the country.”

Google: Analyze your business data with Explore in Google Sheets, use BigQuery too

Google Blog: Analyze your business data with Explore in Google Sheets, use BigQuery too. “A few months back, we announced a new way for you to analyze data in Google Sheets using machine learning. Instead of relying on lengthy formulas to crunch your numbers, now you can use Explore in Sheets to ask questions and quickly gather insights. Check it out.”