G Suite Updates: Google Fusion Tables to be shut down on December 3, 2019

G Suite Updates: Google Fusion Tables to be shut down on December 3, 2019. “Google Fusion Tables was launched almost nine years ago as a research project in Google Labs, later evolving into an experimental product. For a long time, it was one of the few free tools for easily visualizing large datasets, especially on a map. Since then, Google has developed several alternatives, providing deeper experiences in more specialized domains. In order to continue focusing our efforts in these areas, we will be retiring Fusion Tables.”

Quartz: The US plans to stop releasing its most detailed census data

Quartz: The US plans to stop releasing its most detailed census data. “As a data-focused journalist who writes about economic and demographic trends, I use census data a lot. Specifically, I rely on the individual-level microdata that is released by the bureau and turned into an easily usable format by the Minnesota Population Center. I am among tens of of thousands (pdf) of data analysts who rely on this data to study American poverty, health, and population patterns. The US Census announced this week that, because of privacy concerns, this microdata will no longer be made widely available.”

Washington Post: Step aside Edison, Tesla and Bell. New measurement shows when U.S. inventors were most influential.

Washington Post: Step aside Edison, Tesla and Bell. New measurement shows when U.S. inventors were most influential.. “The U.S. patent office has stockpiled the text to more than 10 million patents. But that’s often all they have: an enormous amount of text. Many early patents lack any form of citation or industry specification, which researchers could use to understand the history of American invention. Now a team of economists has created a clever algorithm that processes that text — often the only consistent data we have for many of the country’s most famous inventions — to create a measure of the influential inventors and industries of the past 180 years.”

Technical .ly: Cypher Philly, a project born from a meetup, wants to unlock the power of open data

Technical .ly: Cypher Philly, a project born from a meetup, wants to unlock the power of open data. “For Cypher Philly founder Jess Mason, the copious amounts of open data produced every year by OpenDataPhilly needed another layer that could maximize their potential impact. It’s why he set out — alongside cofounder Jason Cox and about 40 volunteers — to build an application that can connect the dots between data sets meant for transparency and higher government efficiency.”

The Verge: Google, Apple, and Uber must share mapping data with rivals, says UK data group

The Verge: Google, Apple, and Uber must share mapping data with rivals, says UK data group. “Tech companies like Google, Apple, and Uber should be forced to share mapping data with rivals firms and the public sector, the UK government has been advised by a data advocacy group.”

Phys .org: Researchers develop tool that analyzes biomedical data within minutes

Phys .org: Researchers develop tool that analyzes biomedical data within minutes. “Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed a tool that speeds up the analysis and publication of biomedical data from many months or years to mere minutes, transforming the way researchers communicate results of their studies. Until now, the primary method available to share biomedical research data has been through print publication in scientific journals. The new tool, BioJupies, relies on cloud technologies to analyze and visualize large amounts of data, such as that acquired by genome sequencing, as described in the November 2018 issue of Cell Systems.”

University of Iowa Libraries: UI Libraries collaborates to expand access to research data

University of Iowa Libraries: UI Libraries collaborates to expand access to research data. “Students, faculty, and researchers across the Midwest and beyond will gain crucial access to large research datasets through a secure, cloud-based platform called CADRE (Collaborative Archive & Data Research Environment). CADRE will be developed through a large-scale partnership led by the Indiana University Libraries and the Indiana University Network Science Institute.”