BetaNews: Facebook admits to yet another shocking example of leaking user data

BetaNews: Facebook admits to yet another shocking example of leaking user data. “Facebook has sneakily used a blog post purportedly about ‘protecting people’s data’ to reveal that it has failed to do precisely that. In a post in its almost ironically titled Privacy Matters series, Facebook admits that it shared private user data with thousands of app developers when it should not have. Two years ago, Facebook implemented a privacy policy that stopped apps that had not been used for 90 days from sharing data with developers, but it turns out that data was in fact still shared.”

Immuno-Oncology News: FDA’s New ‘Project Patient Voice’ to Share Symptoms Data From Cancer Trials

Immuno-Oncology News: FDA’s New ‘Project Patient Voice’ to Share Symptoms Data From Cancer Trials. “The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has launched an initiative called Project Patient Voice to create a publicly available information bank describing patient-reported symptoms from cancer trials for marketed treatments. The initiative is a part of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence (OCE), which is designed to advance the development and regulation of oncology products for all types of cancers.”

PLOS Blogs: Novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak

PLOS Blogs: Novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak. “The novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak is both saddening and concerning. The scientific community has come together rapidly to address this outbreak in an open and collaborative manner. As a publisher, we look to support the global response to this outbreak by sharing and amplifying research data and findings relevant to the outbreak…. Here is what we are doing…”

It’s not just Google: Amazon, Microsoft, IBM get hospital data, too (Mashable)

Mashable: It’s not just Google: Amazon, Microsoft, IBM get hospital data, too. “The public freaked out in November 2019 at the Wall Street Journal’s revelations that Google was taking in non-anonymous healthcare information from hospital network Ascension. Now, a new report from the Journal shows that the tech giant is far from alone: Microsoft, Amazon Web Services (AWS), and IBM also have data-sharing agreements with hospitals. The scope of work spelled out in those agreements allows for some information to be shared that could identify patients, too.”

Dawn: Senate panel recommends pact with Twitter to block fake accounts

Dawn: Senate panel recommends pact with Twitter to block fake accounts. (This is Pakistan.) “The Senate Standing Commit­tee on Information Technology on Wednesday asked the government to enter into an agreement with Twitter’s management to share information and block fake accounts. The committee members asked the authorities concerned to identify accounts that were allegedly involved in defamation and harassment of individuals as well as organisations.”

Everyone’s Voice Matters: Making Science Open and Accessible to the Public (NLM Musings from the Mezzanine)

NLM Musings from the Mezzanine: Everyone’s Voice Matters: Making Science Open and Accessible to the Public. “Last month, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) released its Draft NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing and Supplemental Draft Guidance (Draft NIH Policy), making it available for public comment. Comments are due by January 10, 2020. Because everyone’s voice matters, I’m calling on the Musings audience to review the draft and offer your perspectives on this policy now!”

Caltech: Electron Tomography Database Changes the Game for Scientific Data Distribution

Caltech: Electron Tomography Database Changes the Game for Scientific Data Distribution. “Caltech researchers in collaboration with the start-up Alexandria have built the world’s first blockchain-powered platform for sharing scientific data. The Electron Tomography Database (ETDB), which is free and open to the public, uses blockchain to securely distribute and track ownership of data without relying on a central authority or moderation. The database is simultaneously a powerful new tool for basic research and proof of concept for a new model of scientific data sharing.”

Techdirt: Vigilant And Its Customers Are Lying About ICE’s Access To Plate Records

Techdirt: Vigilant And Its Customers Are Lying About ICE’s Access To Plate Records. “Everyone’s hooking up ICE with automatic license plate reader (ALPR) data. And everyone’s misleading the public about it, starting with ALPR manufacturer, Vigilant. The EFF has been investigating California law enforcement’s data sharing claims with relation to its Vigilant ALPRs and finding their public statements are directly contradicted by internal communications obtained with public records requests.”

EurekAlert: Data sharing by popular health apps is ‘routine,’ research finds

EurekAlert: Data sharing by popular health apps is ‘routine,’ research finds . “Published in BMJ today, the research team – from the University of Sydney, the University of Toronto and University of California – set out to investigate if and how user data is shared by top rated medicines-related mobile apps. It also sought to characterise privacy risks to app users, both clinicians and consumers. The researchers found sharing of user data by medicines-related apps is routine but far from transparent, and also identified a small number of commercial entities with the ability to aggregate and potentially re-identify user data.”

The Atlantic: The Case for Sharing All of America’s Data on Mosquitoes

The Atlantic: The Case for Sharing All of America’s Data on Mosquitoes. “For decades, agencies around the United States have been collecting data on mosquitoes. Biologists set traps, dissect captured insects, and identify which species they belong to. They’ve done this for millions of mosquitoes, creating an unprecedented trove of information—easily one of the biggest long-term attempts to monitor any group of animals, if not the very biggest. The problem, according to Micaela Elvira Martinez from Princeton University and Samuel Rund from the University of Notre Dame, is that this treasure trove of data isn’t all in the same place, and only a small fraction of it is public. The rest is inaccessible, hoarded by local mosquito-control agencies around the country.”