Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources: Snapshot Wisconsin’s Data Dashboard Now Open To The Public

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources: Snapshot Wisconsin’s Data Dashboard Now Open To The Public. “Snapshot Wisconsin, one of the Department of Natural Resources’ largest citizen science projects, opened its new data visualization tool to the public today. data dashboard is a new tool that lets the public interact with data collected from approximately 2,000 cameras spread across the state to monitor wildlife.”

PR Newswire: FileUnemployment. org Launches ‘DataView’- A Comprehensive Unemployment Database (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: FileUnemployment. org Launches ‘DataView’- A Comprehensive Unemployment Database (PRESS RELEASE). “FileUnemployment.org has further expanded its footprint as a reputable unemployment database by unveiling DataViewTM, a graphical representation of numerical data on US unemployment. Various sets of databases are presented in an attractive graphical format that’s easy to conceptualize. There are also interpretations of the most important trends for the less numerically inclined.”

Search Engine Journal: The Beginner’s Guide to Google Data Studio

Search Engine Journal: The Beginner’s Guide to Google Data Studio. “Originally introduced in beta mid-2016, Google Data Studio is a free data visualization tool. Google Data Studio syncs all of your data sources into one reporting experience. It enables users to create informative and visual dashboards that are easy to interpret, share, and customize.”

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Georgia revamps virus maps, charts that critics said were confusing

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Georgia revamps virus maps, charts that critics said were confusing. “The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) said on Tuesday it revamped its coronavirus website to make maps and charts easier to read and use. The changes follow complaints about poor design of maps and charts by the public, independent health experts and some in the media.”

News-Medical: Researchers develop new tool to visualize worldwide trends in coronavirus infection

News-Medical: Researchers develop new tool to visualize worldwide trends in coronavirus infection. “Researchers at the Complexity Science Hub Vienna (CSH) developed a tool that uses the well-known traffic light system to visualize worldwide trends in coronavirus infection. The ‘CSH Corona Traffic Light’ shows countries in green, yellow, or red based on the confirmed cases within the past two weeks.” The tool is available at https://vis.csh.ac.at/corona-traffic-light/world/ .

SciTechDaily: Carnegie Mellon Tool Automatically Turns Math Into Beautiful and Instructive Illustrations

SciTechDaily: Carnegie Mellon Tool Automatically Turns Math Into Beautiful and Instructive Illustrations. “The tool enables users to create diagrams simply by typing an ordinary mathematical expression and letting the software do the drawing. Unlike a graphing calculator, these expressions aren’t limited to basic functions, but can be complex relationships from any area of mathematics. The researchers named it Penrose after the noted mathematician and physicist Roger Penrose, who is famous for using diagrams and other drawings to communicate complicated mathematical and scientific ideas.”

Columbia Academic Commons: Visualizing Archival Collections for Fun and (Non)Profit Using Google Data Studio

Columbia Academic Commons: Visualizing Archival Collections for Fun and (Non)Profit Using Google Data Studio. “Presentation delivered at Code4Lib 2020, Pittsburgh, 11 March 2020. The presentation used archival collections data from Columbia University’s distinctive collections to demonstrate the effectiveness of Google Data Studio combined with other data manipulation tools to visualize collections data in meaningful ways. The presentation discussed some of the pros and cons of this approach and suggested institutional scenarios for which it could be a good fit.”

EurekAlert: Carnegie Mellon tool automatically turns math into pictures

EurekAlert: Carnegie Mellon tool automatically turns math into pictures. “Some people look at an equation and see a bunch of numbers and symbols; others see beauty. Thanks to a new tool created at Carnegie Mellon University, anyone can now translate the abstractions of mathematics into beautiful and instructive illustrations. The tool enables users to create diagrams simply by typing an ordinary mathematical expression and letting the software do the drawing. Unlike a graphing calculator, these expressions aren’t limited to basic functions, but can be complex relationships from any area of mathematics.”

Google Data Studio: 5 Charts for Visualizing your Data (Towards Data Science)

Towards Data Science: Google Data Studio: 5 Charts for Visualizing your Data. “As the second part of the GDS series, this tutorial will go over specific types of visualizations. With each chart, there are dimensions, metrics, sort, date range, interactions, and style menus that are changeable. In addition to these charts, there is the text you can add, as well as data and filter controls. The dataset below that is used for this tutorial and chart highlight has a filter control to display certain categories over others. The date range filter, also consisting of a drop-down menu, is useful if you want to zoom in or out of your data. The best part of these features is that when you edit a filter in the dashboard view, the data is, therefore, adjusted as well with its respective charts.”

Harvard FXB: New Data Visualization Tool Can Help Officials Assess COVID-19 Vulnerability in Their Communities

Harvard FXB: New Data Visualization Tool Can Help Officials Assess COVID-19 Vulnerability in Their Communities. “Researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics and the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard have made available a data visualization tool for county officials to explore a range of biological, demographic and socioeconomic factors that may heighten the vulnerability of their communities, and impact the county’s ability to respond to this crisis in a just and equitable manner. The tool is available here: https://mkiang.shinyapps.io/county_risks”

Rensselaer: Data Visualization Tool Examines Community Factors Underlying COVID-19 Outcomes

Rensselaer: Data Visualization Tool Examines Community Factors Underlying COVID-19 Outcomes. “A new data visualization tool examines how and why COVID-19 impacts regions differently. Using daily updated data, COVIDMinder compares community risks, mediation tools, and outcomes related to COVID-19 by state across the United States, and by county within New York state.”

North Carolina State University: Visualization Tool Tracks COVID-19

North Carolina State University: Visualization Tool Tracks COVID-19. “How does where I live compare with other regions in reports of COVID-19 infections and deaths? When should we expect our region to start ‘flattening its curve,’ or showing declines in the number of COVID-19 cases? NC State analytics experts Christopher Healey and Susan Simmons built a visualization dashboard using publicly available data that shows these comparisons and predictions.”

The Atlantic: Mapping Wikipedia

The Atlantic: Mapping Wikipedia. “Every time anyone edits Wikipedia, the software records the text added or removed, the time of the edit, and the username of the editor. (This edit history is part of Wikipedia’s ethos of radical transparency: Everyone is anonymous, and you can see what everyone is doing.) When an editor isn’t logged in with a username, the software records that user’s IP address. I parsed all of the 884 million edits to English Wikipedia to collect and geolocate the 43 million IP addresses that have edited English Wikipedia. I also counted 8.6 million username editors who have made at least one edit to an article. The result is a set of maps that offer, for the first time, insight into where the millions of volunteer editors who build and maintain English Wikipedia’s 5 million pages are—and, maybe more important, where they aren’t.”

University of Washington: New, UW-developed data tool tracks state legislative process, from first draft to final law

University of Washington: New, UW-developed data tool tracks state legislative process, from first draft to final law. “Legislators introduce thousands of bills during each session of the Washington State Legislature. But tracking how a bill becomes a law, or what happens to the vast majority that never make it that far, isn’t easy with current technology. A new data visualization tool aims to address this need. Legislative Explorer, or LegEx, developed by University of Washington political science professor John Wilkerson and undergraduate Rohnin Randles, in partnership with Seattle-based Schema Design, draws on bill information made available by the state to enable students, journalists and voters to visually explore the lawmaking process.”