Mashable: 5 interactive tools for learning about abortion access in your state

Mashable: 5 interactive tools for learning about abortion access in your state . “Despite the ruling, a network of activists and professionals have spent decades preparing for and fighting against this now-reality. Reproductive rights organizations, legal institutions, and news organizations have created numerous resources to help guide people through the new restrictions, including many interactive maps and infographics about nationwide policies and access.”

VoxLens: Adding one line of code can make some interactive visualizations accessible to screen-reader users (University of Washington)

University of Washington: VoxLens: Adding one line of code can make some interactive visualizations accessible to screen-reader users. “University of Washington researchers worked with screen-reader users to design VoxLens, a JavaScript plugin that — with one additional line of code — allows people to interact with visualizations. VoxLens users can gain a high-level summary of the information described in a graph, listen to a graph translated into sound or use voice-activated commands to ask specific questions about the data, such as the mean or the minimum value.”

World Health Organization: WHO launches new Mortality Database visualization portal

World Health Organization: WHO launches new Mortality Database visualization portal. “Since its founding in 1948, WHO has required all Member States to report mortality data and collected this information in the WHO Mortality Database. Today, this unique database is the oldest and largest of its kind, containing data from over 120 countries and areas by cause, year, sex, and age. The portal is a significant step towards ensuring mortality data is used to drive impact in countries. Among other features, users can now filter and compare information by disease category or age group. They can also use interactive visualizations to view the data by number of deaths, death rates per 100 000, or as a percentage of total deaths.”

Radboud University: New digital tool reveals spheres of influence of big tech companies

Radboud University: New digital tool reveals spheres of influence of big tech companies. “These companies bring innovations to these domains, but their involvement also results in all kinds of new dependencies, which we are often completely unaware of and which are inadequately regulated. The new tool reveals how far this influence goes and offers both a visual representation and a database with examples of activities of tech companies that are reaching beyond their original spheres of influence.”

NiemanLab: How maps show — and hide — key information about the Ukraine war

NiemanLab: How maps show — and hide — key information about the Ukraine war. “Geographers often speak in terms of what they call the ‘silences’ of maps — what’s missing and unseen, hidden in the margins. Those silences are just as meaningful as what’s on the page. It’s important to ask what has been left out. That’s certainly true when looking at maps depicting aspects of Russia’s war on Ukraine. News organizations around the world have published many maps of the crisis, but their standard views are not the only way maps can help people understand what is happening in Ukraine.”

Capitol Riot Map: Briefing & Updates (Radical Reports)

Radical Reports: Capitol Riot Map: Briefing & Updates. “The Capitol Riot Insurrectionists Networks is a project to map the networks of the more than 700 individuals who have been arrested and charged in connection to the Capitol Riot on January 6th, as well as the more than 100 individuals and organizations issued subpoenas by the U.S. House Select Committee on the January 6 Attack.”

Harvard School of Public Health: Interactive web series explores environmental racism

Harvard School of Public Health: Interactive web series explores environmental racism. “When it comes to exposures to environmental hazards, people of color and low-income groups tend to get the short end of the stick. They are more likely than other groups to live close to highways or power plants; to live in housing with lead, pest, or other problems; and to be exposed to hazardous chemicals in personal care products. A new series of web resources titled Environmental Racism in Greater Boston, produced by experts at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, tells a multifaceted and accessible story, including interactive data visualizations, about disparities in environmental exposures from the regional level to the individual level.”

EurekAlert: HathiTrust Research Center receives NEH support for open research tools

EurekAlert: HathiTrust Research Center receives NEH support for open research tools. “The HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC), cohosted by the School of Information Sciences (iSchool) at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and the Luddy School of Informatics at Indiana University, has received a $325,000 Digital Humanities Advancement Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. One of 15 awarded nationwide, this grant will support the development of a new set of visualizations, analytical tools, and infrastructure to enable users to interact more directly with the rich data extracted from the HathiTrust Digital Library’s collection of more than 17.5 million digitized volumes.”

Hyperallergic: This Extremely Satisfying Website Ranks Emojis By Actual Size

Hyperallergic: This Extremely Satisfying Website Ranks Emojis By Actual Size. “In a light parody of infographics and wall signs you might find in a museum that offer information of actual pedagogical value — such as the size of marine animals or dinosaur species — Emoji to Scale presents us with common sense we learn in early childhood development, like the fact that a mosquito is smaller than a rat, which is smaller than a cat. Beginning with the mosquito emoji, clocking in at three millimeters, a visitor scrolls down to introduce larger emojis, so that at any given point in time every emoji on the screen has the correct proportions in relation to one another.”

Tracking business dynamism during the COVID-19 pandemic: New cross-country evidence and visualisation tool (Vox EU)

Vox EU: Tracking business dynamism during the COVID-19 pandemic: New cross-country evidence and visualisation tool. “Business dynamism is key for creative destruction and to foster resource reallocation – both crucial elements of long-run economic growth. This column uses a new data visualisation tool to reveal large sector- and country-level heterogeneity in the impact on business dynamism of the COVID-19 crisis in 2020 and in recovery. Initially, firm entry fell sharply in all countries, but the pace of recovery varied across countries. Bankruptcies fell and remained below pre-crisis levels well into 2021. The tool allows users to monitor the evolution of key indicators over the recovery period, keeping track of sector-specific patterns.”

HongKiat: 5 Tools to Create Bar Chart Race Without Coding

HongKiat: 5 Tools to Create Bar Chart Race Without Coding. “Data visualization is all these days – no matter what kind of information you want to present, either for school, work, or high-level corporate demos, it’s always important to present data in a very visual way…. Here are some solutions that you can use to create a bar chart race with or without pre-knowledge of coding.”

Washington Post: Dive into the data behind the news with How To Read This Chart, a newsletter from Philip Bump

Washington Post: Dive into the data behind the news with How To Read This Chart, a newsletter from Philip Bump. “In How To Read This Chart, we’ll consider good charts, parse complex ones and discuss how bad ones might be improved. We’ll look at ways in which information might be conveyed more effectively with lines than words. Analyses of pop culture, politics, economics — anything where there’s a number in the news. I’ve done this for a while, having worked as a designer at the software company Adobe and spending years translating data from the news into visuals, so I’m confident in serving as your tour guide.”