Tech war: Chinese database software vendor shrugs off sanctions risk on using open-source code from Oracle’s MySQL system (South China Morning Post)

South China Morning Post: Tech war: Chinese database software vendor shrugs off sanctions risk on using open-source code from Oracle’s MySQL system. “A Chinese software vendor has brushed aside speculation that its enterprise product, which uses code from Oracle Corp’s MySQL open-source relational database management system, faces the risk of sanctions amid simmering tensions between Washington and Beijing.”

Evelyn Perloff: Created database that assists thousands of researchers, students (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Evelyn Perloff: Created database that assists thousands of researchers, students. “In an age when women rarely worked outside of the home — much less earning a Ph.D, — Evelyn Perloff blazed a trail as a formidable research psychologist and scientist. The sole woman professor in the Psychology Department at Purdue University in the 1960s, the centenarian was also the creator of an innovative database that provides reliable and valid methods to measure everything from levels of pain to depression, anxiety, and quality of life.”

Bleeping Computer: Hundreds of Elasticsearch databases targeted in ransom attacks

Bleeping Computer: Hundreds of Elasticsearch databases targeted in ransom attacks. “Hackers have targeted poorly secured Elasticsearch databases and replaced 450 indexes with ransom notes asking for $620 to restore contents, amounting to a total demand of $279,000. The threat actors set a seven-day deadline for the payments and threaten to double the demand after that. If another week passes without getting paid, they say the victim would lose the indexes.”

Arizona State University: Closing the gap for real-time data-intensive intelligence

Arizona State University: Closing the gap for real-time data-intensive intelligence. “The online world fills databases with immense amounts of data. Your local grocery stores, your financial institutions, your streaming services and even your medical providers all maintain vast arrays of information across multiple databases. Managing all this data is a significant challenge. And the process of applying artificial intelligence to make inferences or apply logical rules or interpret information on such data can be urgent, especially when delays, known as latencies, are also a major issue.”

Redis, MongoDB, and Elastic: 2022’s top exposed databases (Bleeping Computer)

Bleeping Computer: Redis, MongoDB, and Elastic: 2022’s top exposed databases. “Security researchers have noticed an increase in the number of databases publicly exposed to the Internet, with 308,000 identified in 2021. The growth continued quarter over quarter, peaking in the first months of this year. In the first quarter of 2022, the amount of exposed databases peaked to 91,200 instances, researchers at threat intelligence and research company Group-IB say in a report shared with BleepingComputer.”

San Francisco Chronicle: San Francisco spent $250,000 on a database to track construction delays. Years later, it has never been used

San Francisco Chronicle: San Francisco spent $250,000 on a database to track construction delays. Years later, it has never been used. “Three years after developing a database meant to track the performance of contractors on city construction projects, the system of checks and balances remains unused, according to a report from the San Francisco Civil Grand Jury.”

University of Georgia: Creating databases to help cure diseases worldwide

University of Georgia: Creating databases to help cure diseases worldwide. “Jessica Kissinger never set out to make databases. From the time she was a little girl, she wanted to be a biologist. Today, the University of Georgia professor not only studies deadly pathogens like malaria and Cryptosporidium (a waterborne parasite), but also is a driving force behind worldwide, groundbreaking collaborations on novel databases. During her time at UGA, she has received nearly $40 million in federal and private grants and contracts.”

TechRadar: Thousands of mobile app cloud databases have been left exposed online

TechRadar Pro: Thousands of mobile app cloud databases have been left exposed online. “Businesses continue to leave their cloud databases unsecured online despite the risk of company data and even user data being exposed. Following a three month study, Check Point Research (CPR) found 2,113 mobile applications whose databases were unprotected in the cloud and could be accessed by anyone with a browser.”

TechCrunch: ApertureData is building a database focused on images with $3M seed

TechCrunch: ApertureData is building a database focused on images with $3M seed. “When Vishakha Gupta and her co-founder Luis Remis were working together at Intel Labs in 2016, they were charged with figuring out how to manage growing amounts of visual data (images and video). As the two founders dug into the problem, working with academics and data scientists, they began an effort to build the proper infrastructure to deal with this growing amount of speciality data.”

Global Banking and Finance Review: Why open databases are easy pickings for cyber criminals

Global Banking and Finance Review: Why open databases are easy pickings for cyber criminals. “Some of the largest breaches in recent times have stemmed from unsecured public databases. In June it was discovered that a database of 815 million records was left unprotected by web hosting company DreamHost. Last year, BlueKai, a data analysis platform owned by Oracle was found to have left potentially billions of records exposed through an unsecured server. Such breaches can be cripplingly expensive for the data holder. The average cost of a breach involving 40-50 million records was estimated to be $364 million in 2020, an increase of $19m from the year before. The average cost in 2020 jumped to $388 million for incidents involving more than 50 million records.”

How to Learn Microsoft Access: 7 Free Online Resources (MakeUseOf)

MakeUseOf: How to Learn Microsoft Access: 7 Free Online Resources. “Long story short, Excel is for data analysis while Access is for data management. It’s a subtle but crucial distinction that means Excel is more useful when you need to crunch numbers, while Access is better when you have to manage a lot of data that’s either non-numeric or relational in some way. While there are tons of resources for learning Excel, the Microsoft Access side is far sparser. That’s why we’ve rounded up a free courses and tutorial series that will introduce you to Microsoft Access, why it’s useful, and how to make use of it.”

VentureBeat: What are graph database query languages?

VentureBeat: What are graph database query languages?. “Classic relational databases can store graphs, and before graph databases it was common for developers to use them because they were the only option. SQL can answer basic questions, but traditional query languages generally can’t answer the most useful and tantalizing questions. Ironically, perhaps, relational databases are not nearly as good at representing very complex relations as graph databases are. Often, the only solution for a relational database query is to return large blocks of data so the client software can run the analysis.”

ComputerWorld: How Google Tables can turn up your productivity

ComputerWorld: How Google Tables can turn up your productivity. “The final Tables version won’t be available for a while, but in the meantime, you can get a taste of what Google’s cookin’ up by checking out the service’s completely free beta version. There’s an awful lot to like about it, and if you decide to stick with it, you’ll be able to move directly from it into the official Tables version whenever that’s released. (Google says it expects that to happen sometime ‘in the next year.’)”

All Hyped Up for HyperCard: Further Adventures with an Apple Legacy Format (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: All Hyped Up for HyperCard: Further Adventures with an Apple Legacy Format. “Jacob and Hilary assisted in updating and expanding the Sustainability of Digital Formats website, which provides information and analysis on over 500 digital file formats and offers guidance on the long-term preservation of digital content at the Library. Through their work, they assisted in providing current information on file formats to users at the Library of Congress and throughout the international digital preservation community. In this blog post, Jacob and Hilary discuss their research on the HyperCard file format.”