BBC: Norway funds satellite map of world’s tropical forests

BBC: Norway funds satellite map of world’s tropical forests. “A unique satellite dataset on the world’s tropical forests is now available for all to see and use. It’s a high-resolution image map covering 64 countries that will be updated monthly. Anyone who wants to understand how trees are being managed will be able to download the necessary information for analysis – for free.”

InsideSources: InsideSources Presents New Searchable COVID Database For Citizens, Journalists

InsideSources: InsideSources Presents New Searchable COVID Database For Citizens, Journalists. “InsideSources presents the ‘COVID-19 Accountability Library,’ a free, searchable database of hundreds of thousands of unique data points on the COVID-19 pandemic. These statements, quotes and comments come from prominent American and international figures. And they are all easily searched in this new online library.”

National Library of New Zealand: Papers Past data has been set free

National Library of New Zealand: Papers Past data has been set free . “Papers Past is the National Library’s fully text searchable website containing over 150 newspapers from New Zealand and the Pacific, as well as magazines, journals and government reports. As a result of the data being released, people can now access the data from 78 New Zealand newspapers from the Albertland Gazette to the Victoria Times, all published before 1900. The data itself consists of the METS/ALTO XML files for each issue. The XML files sit in the back of Papers Past and are what allows you to locate keywords within articles.”

Technology Networks: Database Offers Access to 200 Million Immune Sequences From COVID-19 Patients

Technology Networks: Database Offers Access to 200 Million Immune Sequences From COVID-19 Patients. “Across the world, many laboratories are conducting research relating to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, whether it be to understand the pathophysiology of COVID-19, or to develop robust diagnostics and efficacious therapeutics for the disease. As such, the pandemic has highlighted the critical importance of data sharing within the scientific community. The iReceptor Plus consortium, a European Union (EU)- and Canadian-funded project, has gathered 200 million T and B cell receptor sequences from COVID-19 patients – it is the largest repertoire of its kind. The sequencing data is open source and available online through the iReceptor Gateway.”

VentureBeat: Mozilla Common Voice updates will help train the ‘Hey Firefox’ wakeword for voice-based web browsing

VentureBeat: Mozilla Common Voice updates will help train the ‘Hey Firefox’ wakeword for voice-based web browsing. “Mozilla today released the latest version of Common Voice, its open source collection of transcribed voice data for startups, researchers, and hobbyists to build voice-enabled apps, services, and devices. Common Voice now contains over 7,226 total hours of contributed voice data in 54 different languages, up from 1,400 hours across 18 languages in February 2019.”

Selected Datasets: A New Library of Congress Collection (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Selected Datasets: A New Library of Congress Collection. “Friends, data wranglers, lend me your ears; The Library of Congress’ Selected Datasets Collection is now live! You can now download datasets of the Simple English Wikipedia, the Atlas of Historical County Boundaries, sports economic data, half a million emails from Enron, and urban soil lead abatement from this online collection. This initial set of 20 datasets represents the public start of an ongoing collecting program tied to the Library’s plan to support emerging styles of data-driven research, such as text mining and machine learning.”

Berkeley Haas: Open-source smartphone database offers a new tool for tracking coronavirus exposure

Berkeley Haas: Open-source smartphone database offers a new tool for tracking coronavirus exposure. “The Covid-19 Exposure Indices, created by Berkeley Haas Asst. Prof. Victor Couture and researchers from Yale, Princeton, the University of Chicago, and the University of Pennsylvania in collaboration with location data company PlaceIQ, is aimed at academic investigators studying the spread of the pandemic. The data sets allow researchers to visualize how people can potentially be exposed to those infected with the virus, based on cell-phone movements to and from businesses and other locations where a great deal of the exposure happens.”

FierceBiotech: Life science companies combine to form COVID-19 research database

FierceBiotech: Life science companies combine to form COVID-19 research database. “A group of major CRO, life science, data analytics, publishing and healthcare companies joined forces to release a pro bono research database to build up and integrate a central hub on the latest data out for COVID-19. On the technical side, it’s a secure repository of HIPAA-compliant, de-identified and limited patient-level data sets that will be ‘made available to public health and policy researchers to extract insights to help combat the COVID-19 pandemic,’ according to the group.”

Bing Blogs: Bing delivers new COVID-19 experiences including partnership with GoFundMe to help affected businesses

Bing Blogs: Bing delivers new COVID-19 experiences including partnership with GoFundMe to help affected businesses. “Bing has already released a full-page map tracker of case details by geographic area. Now, those working in academia and research can access our data on cases by geographic area at bing.com/covid/dev or on GitHub. This dataset is pulled from publicly-available sources like the World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control, and more. We then aggregate the data and add latitude and longitude information to it, to make it easier for you to use. Since COVID-19 data is constantly evolving, we have a 24 hour delay so we can ensure the stability of the data that we include. This data is available for non-commercial, public use geared towards medical researchers, government agencies, and academic institutions.”

Analytics India: A Beginner’s Guide To Using Google Colab

Analytics India: A Beginner’s Guide To Using Google Colab. “We are all familiar with the pop-up alerts of ‘memory-error’ while trying to work with a large dataset of machine learning (ML) or deep learning algorithms on Jupyter notebooks. On top of that, owning a decent GPU from an existing cloud provider has remained out of bounds due to the financial investment it entails. The machines at our disposal, unfortunately, do not have the unlimited computational ability. But the wait is finally over as we can now build large ML models without selling our properties. The credit goes to Google for launching the Colab – an online platform that allows anyone to train models with large datasets, absolutely free.”

EdScoop: Researchers publish social media data early for pandemic response

EdScoop: Researchers publish social media data early for pandemic response. “To help represent the spread and impact of the coronavirus pandemic, researchers at the Georgia State University on Monday released a data set of more than 140 million tweets related to COVID-19 as a resource for the global research community. The work is part of research that collects and tracks social media chatter to understand mobility patterns during natural disasters, but researchers decided to release their data before finalizing their own results to assist other researchers studying the current pandemic.”

Los Angeles Times: To aid coronavirus fight, The Times releases database of California cases

Los Angeles Times: To aid coronavirus fight, The Times releases database of California cases. “In an effort to aid scientists and researchers in the fight against COVID-19, The Times has released its database of California coronavirus cases to the public.To follow the virus’ spread, The Times is conducting an independent survey of dozens of local health agencies across the state. The effort, run continually throughout the day, supplies the underlying data for this site’s coronavirus tracker.”

BusinessWire: Free Accelerated Data Transfer Software for COVID-19 Researchers (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Free Accelerated Data Transfer Software for COVID-19 Researchers (PRESS RELEASE). “High-performance data transfer software that can move files ranging from megabytes to terabytes among research institutions, cloud providers, and personal computers at speeds many times faster than traditional software…. Available immediately for an initial 90-day license; requests to extend licenses will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis to facilitate continued research.”

Phys .org: How to quickly and efficiently identify huge gene data sets to help coronavirus research

Phys .org: How to quickly and efficiently identify huge gene data sets to help coronavirus research. “Thanks to the advancement of sequencing technology, it’s possible to produce massive amounts of genome sequence data on various species. It’s crucial to examine pan-genomic data—the entire set of genes possessed by all members of a particular species—particularly in areas like bacteria and virus research, investigation of drug resistance mechanisms and vaccine development. For example, why is the coronavirus resistant to common drugs? Can big data help to rapidly identify the characteristics of such novel virus strains? A group of researchers supported by the EU-funded PANGAIA project is now tackling this challenge by developing methods for comparing gigantic gene data sets.”

USC Viterbi School of Engineering: USC Researchers Release Public Coronavirus Twitter Set for Academics

USC Viterbi School of Engineering: USC Researchers Release Public Coronavirus Twitter Set for Academics. “Researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering Information Sciences Institute (ISI) and the Department of Computer Science have released a public coronavirus twitter dataset for scholars. Emilio Ferrara and Kristina Lerman, the principal researchers on this project, have a history of studying social media and bots to understand how misinformation, fear and influence spread online.”