RIP: The Uncanny Business of Dead Celebrity Endorsements on Social Media (TorrentFreak)

TorrentFreak: RIP: The Uncanny Business of Dead Celebrity Endorsements on Social Media. “The dead are more alive than ever. Thanks to social media and inherited ‘intellectual property rights,’ stars of the past enjoy digital immortality. Icons including Elvis, Marilyn Monroe, and John Lennon remain active on blue-checkmarked social media accounts that are often controlled by for-profit corporations, which don’t require a family tie to the deceased.”

Mashable: 150,000 handpainted hearts on memorial wall represent each life lost to COVID in the UK

Mashable: 150,000 handpainted hearts on memorial wall represent each life lost to COVID in the UK. “150,000 hand-painted red and pink hearts line a wall beside the River Thames in London, with each heart representing a person lost to COVID-19 in the UK. The National COVID Memorial Wall sits on the embankment on the south side of the River Thames in London, stretching nearly 500 metres between Westminster and Lambeth bridges. The hearts have been handpainted by volunteers.”

The Hill: Reported daily COVID-19 deaths dropped to lowest point in year on Sunday

The Hill: Reported daily COVID-19 deaths dropped to lowest point in year on Sunday. “The number of COVID-19 deaths per day reported in the U.S. dropped to its lowest point in more than a year on Sunday, with the country documenting 222 fatalities. The U.S. saw daily toll drop from 676 fatalities recorded on Saturday, according to Johns Hopkins University statistics. The data show the number of daily deaths reached its lowest point since early in the pandemic on March 23, 2020, when 192 deaths were documented.”

Lapham’s Quarterly: Revisiting the Dead

Lapham’s Quarterly: Revisiting the Dead. “Earlier in the year, I heard a news report that mentioned there were few, if any, memorials to those who died in the influenza pandemic of 1918. It just wasn’t the sort of mass death that lent itself easily to memorialization. I wondered if or how we would memorialize our own pandemic. Soon thereafter, I stumbled across a blog post about the burial grounds—and memorials—dedicated to those who died in nineteenth-century pandemics on Staten Island. I wanted to go see all three sites—the one in St. George, one up the road from there, and one farther south along the coast called Seguine Point—thinking maybe I would glimpse into our future.”

WRAL: COVID-19 was third leading cause of death last year, CDC confirms in early data

WRAL: COVID-19 was third leading cause of death last year, CDC confirms in early data. “Covid-19 was the third leading cause of death in the United States last year, after heart disease and cancer, according to provisional data released on Wednesday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The death rate from 2019 to 2020 increased by 15.9%, going up from 715.2 to 828.7 deaths per 100,000 people, according to the report.”

Scoop Culture: Website’s Digital Stories Highlight Care Of Dying Māori Kaumātua

Scoop Culture: Website’s Digital Stories Highlight Care Of Dying Māori Kaumātua. “A new website that focuses on Māori end of life experiences was launched today. Short films showcasing whānau care of kaumātua as they approach death will serve as a key focal point. The site is a response to concerns that Māori are losing knowledge of traditional end of life caregiving tikanga (customs).”

The City: One in 10 Local COVID Victims Destined for Hart Island, NYC’s Potter’s Field

The City: One in 10 Local COVID Victims Destined for Hart Island, NYC’s Potter’s Field. “More people were buried on Hart Island in 2020 than any year during the AIDS epidemic — and the city is on pace to inter one in 10 of its COVID-19 victims in the potter’s field. An exclusive analysis of city data, public records and interviews with dozens of local officials indicates at least 2,334 adults were buried on Hart Island in 2020 — 2 ½ times the figure recorded in 2019 and about 1,000 more than in 1988, the peak year for AIDS burials.”

NOLA: Louisiana doesn’t count people who die behind bars, so Loyola Law School will fill the void

NOLA: Louisiana doesn’t count people who die behind bars, so Loyola Law School will fill the void. “There’s been no shortage of needless deaths in New Orleans-area lock-ups, but until now there’s been no count. That will change thanks to an effort by Loyola University law school to create the database that Louisiana officials have not: a full list of everyone who dies in the state’s prisons, jails and detention centers. Professor Andrea Armstrong’s project aims to restore dignity to people who die behind bars while giving jailors in the world’s incarceration capital the tools to prevent more deaths.”

AP: Married 66 years, husband, wife die minutes apart of virus

AP: Married 66 years, husband, wife die minutes apart of virus. “Bill and Esther Ilnisky spent nearly seven decades together as Christian ministers and missionaries, including stints in the Caribbean and Middle East before preaching for 40 years in Florida. They complemented each other — he the bookworm, she outgoing and charismatic. One without the other seemed unthinkable. So when they died minutes apart of COVID-19 this month at a Palm Beach County hospice, it may have been a hidden blessing, their only child, Sarah Milewski, said — even if it was a devastating double loss for her.”

FEMA: COVID-19 Funeral Assistance

FEMA: COVID-19 Funeral Assistance. “Under the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021 and the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, FEMA will provide financial assistance for COVID-19-related funeral expenses incurred after January 20, 2020. We are working with stakeholder groups to get their input on ways we can best provide this assistance, and to enlist their help with outreach to families and communities. FEMA will begin to implement COVID-19 funeral assistance in April.”

Getty: See the Faces of People Who Lived in Egypt under the Roman Empire

Getty: See the Faces of People Who Lived in Egypt under the Roman Empire. “In Egypt, it was customary to mummify the deceased and create a likeness of them, often in the form of a mummy mask or an anthropoid (human-form) coffin. From the first to third centuries AD, after Egypt had become a province of the Roman Empire, the traditional practice of mummification continued but a new trend also arose: some individuals chose to be represented in portraits painted on thin wooden panels or linen burial shrouds that were affixed to their mummy wrappings. These mummy portraits were part of ancient Egyptian traditions and their preparations for the afterlife…. Discover more about these mummy portraits and the stories they tell, in the new Google Arts & Culture exhibition: Faces of Roman Egypt.”

Laughing Squid: Images of New Yorkers Lost to COVID-19 Projected Onto the Brooklyn Bridge in a Moving Tribute

Laughing Squid: Images of New Yorkers Lost to COVID-19 Projected Onto the Brooklyn Bridge in a Moving Tribute. “COVID Day of Remembrance, a moving tribute to the 30,258 New Yorkers who died from COVID-19, took place on March 14, 2021. This date marked the tragic anniversary of the first New York City death due to this horrific pandemic. To remember those whom the city has lost forever, images of COVID victims were projected onto the Brooklyn Bridge.”

Washington Post: José Alberto Ortiz Chevez Jr., who loved his family and cooking, dies of covid-19

Washington Post: José Alberto Ortiz Chevez Jr., who loved his family and cooking, dies of covid-19. “Those who knew Chevez well say his affinity for the city was only superseded by the love he had for his family. When he finally felt ready in June to move into his own apartment — in the District’s Manor Park neighborhood — Chevez, then 30, still called his mother every day, to say good morning, be careful and ‘I love you.’ It was a tradition he carried on until he was physically unable to continue. Chevez was intubated in late December, just over a week after he tested positive for the coronavirus. Covid-19 had decimated his lungs, and a doctor told his family that it was among the most aggressive cases they’d seen.”