Stars and Stripes: Free online records database aims to identify unknown troops from WW2

Stars and Stripes: Free online records database aims to identify unknown troops from WW2. “An online database that could be used to identify unknown World War II-era U.S. servicemembers buried around the world will soon be available free to families and researchers. The directory — which cross-references information about recovered unknown troops with missing servicemembers’ attributes — is expected to go live sometime this month. It was developed by Kenneth Breaux and his team at the Houston-based M.I.A. Recovery Network, a nonprofit that advocates for missing-in-action servicemembers and their families.”

University of Colorado Boulder: When celebrities die, ‘grief policing’ abounds, social media gets toxic

University of Colorado Boulder: When celebrities die, ‘grief policing’ abounds, social media gets toxic. “After the deaths of David Bowie, Prince and actor Alan Rickman in 2016, grieving fans flocked to public comment threads on social media to pay their respects in what has been likened to a virtual wake. But many also arrived to find a toxic space where so-called ‘grief police’ mocked them for lamenting the loss of a stranger, chastised them for emotional rubber-necking or even dissed the dead. That’s the key finding of a study published this week by CU Boulder researchers who analyzed more than 7,000 Facebook comments to gain insight into how people mourn death in the internet age. Their conclusion: People are surprisingly mean to each other online even in times of tragedy, but some technological fixes could likely make things better.”

Digital Journal: WW2 Research Inc. and Research Expert Bill Beigel Launch WW2 Casualties Database (PRESS RELEASE)

Digital Journal: WW2 Research Inc. and Research Expert Bill Beigel Launch WW2 Casualties Database (PRESS RELEASE). “WW2 Research Inc founder and research expert William L. ‘Bill’ Beigel has announced the launch of his WW2 Casualties Database. The database has launched with more than 100,000 names and other vital information on U.S. WWII casualties. When complete, the database will include all 407,000 American service members who died in active duty in World War II. The database will be the first complete, public, and searchable online resource to include all U.S. WWII casualties, with corrections to some of the errors in the historic listings at the National Archives.”

Arizona State University: ASU students learn from the dead at Teotihuacan

Arizona State University: ASU students learn from the dead at Teotihuacan. “Teotihuacan was once the largest and most influential city in the ancient new world. Yet its social structure seems to be more egalitarian than those in its fellow ancient cities. ‘Most ancient societies had an elite class that lived in big houses and had big fancy tombs. Then you got the commoners living in little houses and their burials were very simple with no gravestones,’ said Michael E. Smith, a professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University. ‘You don’t seem to have that distinction at Teotihuacan.'”

Introducing We Remember – Free Online Memorials (Ancestry)

Ancestry:Introducing We Remember – Free Online Memorials. “With We Remember, you can quickly and easily create a free public memorial page for a loved one. Rather than being a research page, the We Remember page is designed to gather and showcase memories about your loved one. You can celebrate their life by bringing together those who knew them and collecting stories, and photos, to paint a rich picture of who they were.”

Voice of America: Even After Death, Social Media Still Connects Loved Ones

Voice of America: Even After Death, Social Media Still Connects Loved Ones. “Social media is turning into a vast graveyard for profiles of owners who have passed away, leaving them unattended or as standing memorials. And some experts are urging social networks to do more to help users prepare for their digital deaths. There are millions of them – pages that remain on social media sites, and in some cases, automatically update after their owners’ death. The numbers vary from 5 million to as many as 300 million, according to Jed Brubaker, a digital death expert with the University of Colorado, Boulder. But it’s hard to know the exact numbers because ‘tracking the rate of death across the world is hard,’ he said.”

Corporate Crime Reporter: New Database Documents State Worker Death Prosecutions

Corporate Crime Reporter: New Database Documents State Worker Death Prosecutions. “The database catalogues state criminal prosecutions against companies and individuals whose actions caused a worker’s death or serious injury. The database contains information on 75 incidents in 16 states that have led to criminal charges and provides additional related materials.”