Berkeley Engineering: UC Berkeley professor influences Facebook’s efforts to combat deepfakes

Berkeley Engineering: UC Berkeley professor influences Facebook’s efforts to combat deepfakes . “Hany Farid, a Berkeley professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences, was one of the researchers Facebook approached last year. The company ultimately invested $7.5 million with Berkeley, Cornell University and the University of Maryland to develop technology to spot the deepfakes. In a brief interview, Farid, who has a joint appointment at the School of Information, said manipulated videos, which often portray politicians and celebrities saying or doing things they didn’t do, pose a serious threat to society.”

CNN: Now fake Facebook accounts are using fake faces

CNN: Now fake Facebook accounts are using fake faces. “Artificially-generated faces of people who don’t exist are being used to front fake Facebook (FB) accounts in an attempt to trick users and game the company’s systems, the social media network said Friday. Experts who reviewed the accounts say it is the first time they have seen fake images like this being used at scale as part of a single social media campaign.”

MIT Technology Review: Making deepfake tools doesn’t have to be irresponsible. Here’s how.

MIT Technology Review: Making deepfake tools doesn’t have to be irresponsible. Here’s how.. “Synthetic media technologies—popularly known as deepfakes—have real potential for positive impact. Voice synthesis, for example, will allow us to speak in hundreds of languages in our own voice. Video synthesis may help us simulate self-driving-car accidents to avoid mistakes in the future. And text synthesis can accelerate our ability to write both programs and prose. But these advances can come at a gargantuan cost if we aren’t careful: the same underlying technologies can also enable deception with global ramifications.”

Ars Technica: I created my own deepfake—it took two weeks and cost $552

Ars Technica: I created my own deepfake—it took two weeks and cost $552. “My Ars overlords gave me a few days to play around with deepfake software and a $1,000 cloud computing budget. A couple of weeks later, I have my result, which you can see above. I started with a video of Mark Zuckerberg testifying before Congress and replaced his face with that of Lieutenant Commander Data (Brent Spiner) from Star Trek: The Next Generation. Total spent: $552.”

Ars Technica: Twitter wants your feedback on its proposed deepfakes policy

Ars Technica: Twitter wants your feedback on its proposed deepfakes policy. “A lie has always been able to travel faster than the truth, and that goes double on Twitter, where a combination of bad human choices and bad-faith bots amplifies false messaging almost instantly around the world. So what should a social media platform do about it? The question is not rhetorical. Twitter is trying to come up with a policy for handling ‘synthetic and manipulated media,’ the company said in a blog post today, and it wants your input.”

Bloomberg Government: Facebook, Google, Twitter Detail How to Address Deepfake Videos

Bloomberg Government: Facebook, Google, Twitter Detail How to Address Deepfake Videos. “Facebook, Twitter and Google are considering policy changes on handling realistic but fake videos and images following a widely circulated doctored video of Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the companies told a key lawmaker. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) asked the three companies in July 15 letters to detail how they planned to address doctored videos and images, including ‘deepfakes,’ which are manipulated content created with artificial intelligence.”