Berkeley Engineering: UC Berkeley professor influences Facebook’s efforts to combat deepfakes

Berkeley Engineering: UC Berkeley professor influences Facebook’s efforts to combat deepfakes . “Hany Farid, a Berkeley professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences, was one of the researchers Facebook approached last year. The company ultimately invested $7.5 million with Berkeley, Cornell University and the University of Maryland to develop technology to spot the deepfakes. In a brief interview, Farid, who has a joint appointment at the School of Information, said manipulated videos, which often portray politicians and celebrities saying or doing things they didn’t do, pose a serious threat to society.”

CNN: Now fake Facebook accounts are using fake faces

CNN: Now fake Facebook accounts are using fake faces. “Artificially-generated faces of people who don’t exist are being used to front fake Facebook (FB) accounts in an attempt to trick users and game the company’s systems, the social media network said Friday. Experts who reviewed the accounts say it is the first time they have seen fake images like this being used at scale as part of a single social media campaign.”

MIT Technology Review: Making deepfake tools doesn’t have to be irresponsible. Here’s how.

MIT Technology Review: Making deepfake tools doesn’t have to be irresponsible. Here’s how.. “Synthetic media technologies—popularly known as deepfakes—have real potential for positive impact. Voice synthesis, for example, will allow us to speak in hundreds of languages in our own voice. Video synthesis may help us simulate self-driving-car accidents to avoid mistakes in the future. And text synthesis can accelerate our ability to write both programs and prose. But these advances can come at a gargantuan cost if we aren’t careful: the same underlying technologies can also enable deception with global ramifications.”

Ars Technica: I created my own deepfake—it took two weeks and cost $552

Ars Technica: I created my own deepfake—it took two weeks and cost $552. “My Ars overlords gave me a few days to play around with deepfake software and a $1,000 cloud computing budget. A couple of weeks later, I have my result, which you can see above. I started with a video of Mark Zuckerberg testifying before Congress and replaced his face with that of Lieutenant Commander Data (Brent Spiner) from Star Trek: The Next Generation. Total spent: $552.”

Ars Technica: Twitter wants your feedback on its proposed deepfakes policy

Ars Technica: Twitter wants your feedback on its proposed deepfakes policy. “A lie has always been able to travel faster than the truth, and that goes double on Twitter, where a combination of bad human choices and bad-faith bots amplifies false messaging almost instantly around the world. So what should a social media platform do about it? The question is not rhetorical. Twitter is trying to come up with a policy for handling ‘synthetic and manipulated media,’ the company said in a blog post today, and it wants your input.”

Bloomberg Government: Facebook, Google, Twitter Detail How to Address Deepfake Videos

Bloomberg Government: Facebook, Google, Twitter Detail How to Address Deepfake Videos. “Facebook, Twitter and Google are considering policy changes on handling realistic but fake videos and images following a widely circulated doctored video of Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the companies told a key lawmaker. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) asked the three companies in July 15 letters to detail how they planned to address doctored videos and images, including ‘deepfakes,’ which are manipulated content created with artificial intelligence.”

CNET: Adobe AI can spot facial manipulations in Photoshop

CNET: Adobe AI can spot facial manipulations in Photoshop. “In a world filled with manipulated photos, deepfakes and even totally fake human faces, Adobe says it’s working on an artificial intelligence tool to spot fake images. Citing ‘the ethical implications’ of Photoshop, Adobe partnered with researchers from the University of California at Berkeley to work on the issue.”

Federal News Network: NARA considers blockchain to verify records amid rise in deepfake videos

Federal News Network: NARA considers blockchain to verify records amid rise in deepfake videos. “The National Archives and Records Administration is exploring whether blockchain technology can help records management officials keep track of their vast stores of information, following the successful rollout of the emerging technology elsewhere in government.”

CNET: This website uses AI to generate startling fake human faces

CNET: This website uses AI to generate startling fake human faces. “When you visit the website “This Person Does Not Exist” you will likely see a face smiling back at you. Seems innocent enough — until you realize the face is not actually real, but generated by a neural network algorithm. That person is not real. They don’t exist.” Based on my playing with this, AI has the most problems with ears, teeth, and hair.

Wired: These New Tricks Can Outsmart Deepfake Videos—for Now

Wired: These New Tricks Can Outsmart Deepfake Videos—for Now. “For weeks, computer scientist Siwei Lyu had watched his team’s deepfake videos with a gnawing sense of unease. Created by a machine learning algorithm, these falsified films showed celebrities doing things they’d never done. They felt eerie to him, and not just because he knew they’d been ginned up. ‘They don’t look right,’ he recalls thinking, ‘but it’s very hard to pinpoint where that feeling comes from.’ Finally, one day, a childhood memory bubbled up into his brain. ”

Deepfakes for dancing: you can now use AI to fake those dance moves you always wanted (The Verge)

The Verge: Deepfakes for dancing: you can now use AI to fake those dance moves you always wanted. “Artificial intelligence is proving to be a very capable tool when it comes to manipulating videos of people. Face-swapping deepfakes have been the most visible example, but new applications are being found every day. The latest? Call it deepfakes for dancing — it uses AI to read someone’s dance moves and copy them on to a target body.”

Poynter: We tried to create a deepfake of Mark Zuckerberg and Alex Jones — and failed. Here’s what happened.

Poynter: We tried to create a deepfake of Mark Zuckerberg and Alex Jones — and failed. Here’s what happened.. “Making it look like someone did or said something that never happened is harder than it looks. That’s what Poynter learned over the past several weeks while trying to create a ‘deepfake’ video of Alex Jones, Infowars host and frequent conspiracy theorist, giving remarks that were actually made by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Deepfakes, named after the Reddit user who came up with the method, are essentially created by extracting a large number of frames from one video and superimposing them on one another.”

Gizmodo: Deepfake Videos Are Getting Impossibly Good

Gizmodo: Deepfake Videos Are Getting Impossibly Good. “Fake news sucks, and as those eerily accurate videos of a lip-synced Barack Obama demonstrated last year, it’s soon going to get a hell of a lot worse. As a newly revealed video-manipulation system shows, super-realistic fake videos are improving faster than some of us thought possible. The SIGGRAPH 2018 computer graphics and design conference is scheduled for August 12 to 16 in Vancouver, British Columbia, but we’re already getting a taste of the jaw-dropping technologies that are set to go on display.”

BuzzFeed: How To Spot A Deepfake Like The Barack Obama–Jordan Peele Video

BuzzFeed: How To Spot A Deepfake Like The Barack Obama–Jordan Peele Video. “Don’t be embarrassed if you were fooled, even if only briefly. Technology to trick our eyes and ears is advancing rapidly. Teams in Germany are working on Face2Face, the type of face- and voice-swapping technology used to create the video above. Software giant Adobe is creating a “Photoshop for audio” that makes it easy to edit and manipulate what someone has said, as is a Montreal startup called Lyrebird. After you’ve selectively edited someone’s words, you could take that audio and use tech developed at the University of Washington to generate a video of the very same person speaking those words, just to make it fully convincing.”