News@Northeastern: Can Listening To The Beatles Improve Your Memory? New Research Says Music Just Might Stir The Brain

News@Northeastern: Can Listening To The Beatles Improve Your Memory? New Research Says Music Just Might Stir The Brain. “Published in Nature’s Scientific Reports, Loui found that for older adults who listened to some of their favorite music, including The Beatles, connectivity in the brain increased. Specifically, [Psyche] Loui—and her multi-disciplinary team of music therapists, neurologists and geriatric psychiatrists—discovered that music bridged the gap between the brain’s auditory system and reward system, the area that governs motivation.”

CNET: VR Exercise Games Could Offer Hope for Delaying Dementia

CNET: VR Exercise Games Could Offer Hope for Delaying Dementia. “Virtual reality exergaming has exploded in popularity in recent years, with more people getting a workout by using PlayStation VR or Oculus headsets and playing games like Beat Saber and Supernatural. Less known is the impact VR exergaming may have on improving cognitive function in older adults. Growing research, however, suggests VR exergaming, or ‘gamercising,’ may help slow cognitive decline, which could have a major impact on the health and quality of life for seniors.”

KX News: ND Health Department debuts ‘Alzheimer’s and Dementia Data’ website dashboard

KX News: ND Health Department debuts ‘Alzheimer’s and Dementia Data’ website dashboard. “North Dakota has the fourth highest mortality rate for Alzheimer’s disease in the United States (U.S.) at 52.9 per 100,000 North Dakota residents. The rate for the U.S. is 37 per 100,000 residents. In 2016, according to the dashboard, there were 405 deaths in the state from Alzheimer’s and dementia. In 2020, that number jumped to 505.”

World Health Organization: WHO launches new platform for knowledge exchange on dementia

World Health Organization: WHO launches new platform for knowledge exchange on dementia. “The new tool, the Global Dementia Observatory Knowledge Exchange Platform, contains key resources to support the implementation of the Global action plan on the public heath response to dementia 2017-2025 and its seven action areas. It provides a space for stakeholders to share resources, such as policies, guidelines, case studies and examples of good practice, to facilitate mutual learning and promote the exchange of knowledge in the area of dementia.”

Good News Story: Nigerian Irish Teen Girls Win Prize For Dementia App (NPR)

NPR: Good News Story: Nigerian Irish Teen Girls Win Prize For Dementia App. “Memory Haven can be used by both patients and caregivers. Its six features target three problems faced by those with dementia: memory loss and difficulty with recognition and speech. A reminder feature, for example, alerts both the patient and caregiver that it’s time for medication, while photo albums allow users to flip through tagged photos identifying who is in the image.”

Hey, Google? Alexa? Am I At Risk for Alzheimer’s?: UMass Boston Professor Part of $1.1M Research Project (UMass Boston)

UMass Boston: Hey, Google? Alexa? Am I At Risk for Alzheimer’s?: UMass Boston Professor Part of $1.1M Research Project. “Assistant Professor of Computer Science Xiaohui Liang is leading a four-year $1,179,714 National Institute on Aging (NIA)-funded research project to use Voice Assistant Systems, such as Amazon’s Alexa and Google Home, to detect early cognitive impairment. Early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias in older adults living alone is essential for developing, planning, and ensuring adequate support at home for patients and their families.”

The Conversation: Truly smart homes could help dementia patients live independently

The Conversation: Truly smart homes could help dementia patients live independently. “The growing number of people with dementia is encouraging care providers to look to technology as a way of supporting human carers and improving patients’ quality of life. In particular, we want to use technology to help people with dementia live more independently for as long as possible.”

TechCrunch: Google announces Action Blocks, a new accessibility tool for creating mobile shortcuts

TechCrunch: Google announces Action Blocks, a new accessibility tool for creating mobile shortcuts. “Google today announced Action Blocks, a new accessibility tool that allows you to create shortcuts for common multi-step tasks with the help of the Google Assistant. In that respect, Action Blocks isn’t all that different from Shortcuts on iOS, for example, but Google is specifically looking at this as an accessibility feature for people with cognitive disabilities.”

UC Davis Health: $4 million grant to UC Davis and Drexel tests online tool for caregivers of individuals with dementia

UC Davis Health: $4 million grant to UC Davis and Drexel tests online tool for caregivers of individuals with dementia. “Agitation and aggression are just a few of the behavioral and psychological symptoms that people with Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders – and their caregivers — can have difficulty understanding and managing. But an easy-to-use online platform, called WeCareAdvisor, aims to bridge the information gap for caregivers, who are typically family members. The tool educates caregivers about dementia and provides daily tips for managing stress. It also offers a systematic approach for describing, investigating, creating and evaluating strategies, known as the DICE approach.”

The Healthy Cognitive Aging Project: A major data resource for cognitive epidemiology (National Institute on Aging)

National Institute on Aging: The Healthy Cognitive Aging Project: A major data resource for cognitive epidemiology . “Anybody who has ever loved, lived with, or cared for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or its related dementias knows that its effects are multifaceted, complex, and often difficult to predict. That’s why NIA’s longitudinal aging studies are so important—they can provide prospective data on these as-yet incompletely understood points. This week, we are proud to announce the first public release of data from the Healthy Cognitive Aging Project (HCAP), a nationally representative study that will help shed light on how and when cognitive decline progresses in older adults.”