Columbia Climate School: New York City’s Hidden Old-Growth Forests

Columbia Climate School: New York City’s Hidden Old-Growth Forests. “Historic preservation has never been New York’s strong point; about 1,000 old buildings are demolished or gut-renovated every year, the remains mostly going to landfills. Now, a team from the Tree Ring Laboratory at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is harnessing the destruction to systematically mine torn-out timbers for data. Annual growth rings from trees that were young in the 1500s may offer records of past climate no longer available from living trees. Studies of timber species, ages and provenances can shed light on the history of U.S. logging, commerce and transport.

Fast Company: IBM’s new AI tool figures out exactly how much carbon each tree can capture

Fast Company: IBM’s new AI tool figures out exactly how much carbon each tree can capture. “All trees suck up CO2 as they grow. But the type of tree and where it’s planted make a difference in how much carbon it can capture—and when companies pay for carbon offsets in forests, they’re often based on generic estimates that may not quite represent what’s actually growing in an area. A new tool in development from IBM uses AI to precisely map specific trees and better understand their climate benefit.”

Mondo Visione: New Open-Access FRESCOS Tool Launched For Accounting The Carbon Sequestration In Forestry Projects

Mondo Visione: New Open-Access FRESCOS Tool Launched For Accounting The Carbon Sequestration In Forestry Projects. “The overall goal of the FRESCOS Tool is to better account and analyse the carbon balance of forestry and agroforestry projects. This information can then be further used to estimate the annual net emissions of an investment portfolio. However, the tool can be used by any organisation – such as a forestry company or investor – interested in gaining insights on carbon sequestration and a better understanding of the climate impact that forestry projects can have.”

Bloomberg CityLab: The U.S. Neighborhoods With the Greatest Tree Inequity, Mapped

Bloomberg CityLab: The U.S. Neighborhoods With the Greatest Tree Inequity, Mapped. “A new analysis quantifies just now unequal tree cover is in the U.S.: Neighborhoods with a majority of people of color have, on average, 33% less tree canopy than majority-white communities, according to data from the Tree Equity Score map, a project of the conservation nonprofit American Forests. The poorest neighborhoods, where 90% of residents live in poverty, have 41% less coverage than the wealthiest ones.”

Nature: Ancient oaks of Europe are archives — protect them

Nature: Ancient oaks of Europe are archives — protect them. “Fennoscandia and the United Kingdom could better safeguard their oaks using mechanisms such as those offered by the European Union’s Natura 2000 network of protected areas, or the protections conferred by UNESCO World Heritage sites in the United Kingdom. Otherwise, unsustainable management practices, deforestation, air pollution and climate change could leave these ancient species vulnerable to disease and extinction, with the loss of irreplaceable scientific information and cultural heritage.” Clueless about Fennoscandia? Me too. WorldAtlas helped me out.

Mongabay: How to pick a tree-planting project? Mongabay launches transparency tool to help supporters decide

Mongabay: How to pick a tree-planting project? Mongabay launches transparency tool to help supporters decide. “Mongabay has put together a directory to show whether tree-planting and reforestation projects publicly disclose the criteria that experts say are keys to success. We thought this would be a useful starting point for people wanting to fund reforestation, so they could identify projects that align with their interests. Our Reforestation Directory is built on a three-month research effort to record publicly available information on more than 350 tree-planting projects in 80 countries. Rather than make an assessment (and perceived endorsement) of the quality of the projects, Mongabay’s review is based on how much information is publicly disclosed by an organization.”

Royal Astronomical Society: Can you help us find the Moon Trees?

Royal Astronomical Society: Can you help us find the Moon Trees?. “There could be as many as 15 Moon Trees in the UK – trees grown from seeds flown around the Moon by NASA astronaut Stuart Roosa on the Apollo 14 mission in 1971. But where are they now? The Royal Astronomical Society and the UK Space Agency would love to know, in their joint quest to find these living pieces of space history.”

DigitalNC: Films from Forest History Society are now on DigitalNC

DigitalNC: Films from Forest History Society are now on DigitalNC. “Fourteen films about various aspects of the forestry industry and forest conservation are now online from the Forest History Society. The films date from the 1920s up to one about the Yellowstone National Park fires in 1988. Thanks to our colleagues in the Southern Folklife Collection, these audiovisual materials were digitized utilizing funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.”

Phys .org: New mangrove forest mapping tool puts conservation in reach of coastal communities

Phys .org: New mangrove forest mapping tool puts conservation in reach of coastal communities. “Approximately 35 percent of global mangrove cover was lost in the 1980s and ’90s. While the rate of loss slowed in the past two decades—to an estimated four percent between 1996 and 2016—many regions remain hotspots for mangrove loss, including Myanmar. My colleagues and I use satellite imagery and field measurements to study mangrove ecosystems in several countries. We’ve developed an accessible and intuitive tool that provides coastal managers with the accurate, reliable, up-to-date and locally relevant information they need for effective community-based conservation of these critical blue (marine) forests.”

Forests News: New portal tracks policies and trends impacting forests in Central Africa

Forests News: New portal tracks policies and trends impacting forests in Central Africa. “The Observatory of Central African Forests (OFAC), which was created over a decade ago to address that challenge, has now launched an analysis portal that keeps track of policies and trends to examine their impact on forest ecosystems at the regional, national and local levels. The objective of the digital platform is to provide a single-entry point through which researchers and decision-makers can access information on the subject and follow emerging trends.”

BBC: Norway funds satellite map of world’s tropical forests

BBC: Norway funds satellite map of world’s tropical forests. “A unique satellite dataset on the world’s tropical forests is now available for all to see and use. It’s a high-resolution image map covering 64 countries that will be updated monthly. Anyone who wants to understand how trees are being managed will be able to download the necessary information for analysis – for free.”

Lonely Planet: New online database tracks historic ‘witch marks’ carved into England’s trees

Lonely Planet: New online database tracks historic ‘witch marks’ carved into England’s trees. “A new online database has launched that allows users to browse more than 100 examples of graffiti etched on trees in the New Forest in England. The New Forest National Park Authority (NPA) has curated examples of symbols and writing on trees at the national park, some of which date back hundreds of years, including marks from those seeking protection from witches.”

Hindustan Times: Maharashtra gets India’s first wood anatomical database for mangrove tree species

Hindustan Times: Maharashtra gets India’s first wood anatomical database for mangrove tree species. “Maharashtra has become the first state in India to undertake forensic timber identification of mangrove tree species for enhanced conservation of the salt-tolerant coastal trees. The Institute of Wood Sciences and Technology (IWST), Bengaluru, has come up with a first-of-its-kind study for developing an inventory of wood anatomy of mangrove species along the Maharashtra coast.”

Fast Company: This tool is mapping every tree in California to help stop megafires

Fast Company: This tool is mapping every tree in California to help stop megafires. “If you zoom in on a new map of California, you’ll start to see that the fields of green that represent the forest are actually made up of individual green points, and each point represents a real, individual tree. The tool, called the California Forest Observatory, uses AI and satellite images to create an ultradetailed view of the state’s forests—aiding work to prevent the type of catastrophic megafires that the state is experiencing now.”

Mashable: The interactive fall foliage map is back to help you plan your autumn road trip

Mashable: The interactive fall foliage map is back to help you plan your autumn road trip. “If you’ve never used the annual interactive tool before, you’re in for a real treat. This year’s map begins on Sept. 7, a day when minimal and patchy foliage is predicted in only a few states. The map concludes on Nov. 23, when nearly the entire country will be be past-peak foliage.”