News Central: Bangladeshis Use Social Media to Tackle a Dengue Outbreak

News Central: Bangladeshis Use Social Media to Tackle a Dengue Outbreak. “As government resources are seemingly overwhelmed by the severity of this recent spike in dengue cases, people are turning to social media to voice their complaints, share information about the spread of the virus, and to spread awareness about how people can protect themselves.”

Stanford Scope: Abuzz aims to combat mosquito-spread diseases using cellphones

Stanford Scope: Abuzz aims to combat mosquito-spread diseases using cellphones. “Itching to help combat the scourge of mosquito-borne diseases? I’ve got just the thing: Abuzz. The crowd-sourced project birthed in the lab of Stanford’s Manu Prakash, PhD, is aiming to map the prevalence of mosquitos worldwide using audio recorded by cellphones. Participation is simple: Spot a mosquito, grab your phone — even an old flip one will do — and point the microphone at it.”

Search and deploy: Google may be the next weapon to beat epidemics (Cosmos)

Cosmos: Search and deploy: Google may be the next weapon to beat epidemics. “In research published in PLOS Computational Biology, an international team has used a mathematical modelling tool to track dengue-related Google searches to better predict dengue fever activity…. Despite the huge number of individuals at risk each year, governments rely on hospital-based reporting to monitor the disease, a method hampered by poor communication and time constraints. In response to the demand for an effective disease surveillance tool, the researchers drew on a simple premise: the more people affected by dengue, the more Google searches on the topic.”

New Web Site Hopes to Use Crowdsourcing to Track Dengue Fever Outbreaks

A new Web site hopes to use crowdsourcing to track dengue fever outbreaks (PRESS RELEASE). “Through a userfriendly online chat system, the tool will build a crowdsourced map of dengue outbreak. Users – known as Dengue Trackers – can access free toolkits to help them reduce their risk of dengue fever while providing details of outbreaks.”